Bezzine S

References (13)

Title : Efficient heterologous expression of Fusarium solani lipase, FSL2, in Pichia pastoris, functional characterization of the recombinant enzyme and molecular modeling - Jallouli_2016_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_94_61
Author(s) : Jallouli R , Parsiegla G , Carriere F , Gargouri Y , Bezzine S
Ref : Int J Biol Macromol , 94 :61 , 2016
Abstract : The gene coding for a lipase of Fusarium solani, designated as FSL2, shows an open reading frame of 906bp encoding a 301-amino acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of 30kDa. Based on sequence similarity with other fungal lipases, FSL2 contains a catalytic triad, consisting of Ser144, Asp198, and His256. FSL2 cDNA was subcloned into the pGAPZalphaA vector containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor signal sequence and this construct was used to transform Pichia pastoris and achieve a high-level extracellular production of a FSL2 lipase. Maximum lipase activity was observed after 48h. The optimum activity of the purified recombinant enzyme was measured at pH 8.0-9.0 and 37 degrees C. FSL2 is remarkably stable at alkaline pH values up to 12 and at temperatures below 40 degrees C. It has high catalytic efficiency towards triglycerides with short to long chain fatty acids but with a marked preference for medium and long chain fatty acids. FSL2 activity is decreased at sodium taurodeoxycholate concentrations above the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of this anionic detergent. However, lipase activity is enhanced by Ca2+ and inhibited by EDTA or Cu2+ and partially by Mg2+ or K+. In silico docking of medium chain triglycerides, monogalctolipids (MGDG), digalactolipids (DGDG) and long chain phospholipids in the active site of FSL2 reveals structural solutions.
ESTHER : Jallouli_2016_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_94_61
PubMedSearch : Jallouli_2016_Int.J.Biol.Macromol_94_61
PubMedID: 27620466
Gene_locus related to this paper: fushe-LIPASE

Title : The galactolipase activity of Fusarium solani (phospho)lipase - Jallouli_2015_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1851_282
Author(s) : Jallouli R , Othman H , Amara S , Parsiegla G , Carriere F , Srairi-Abid N , Gargouri Y , Bezzine S
Ref : Biochimica & Biophysica Acta , 1851 :282 , 2015
Abstract : The purified (phospho)lipase of Fusarium solani (FSL), was known to be active on both triglycerides and phospholipids. This study aimed at assessing the potential of this enzyme in hydrolyzing galactolipids. FSL was found to hydrolyze at high rates of synthetic medium chains monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (4658+/-146U/mg on DiC8-MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (3785+/-83U/mg on DiC8-DGDG) and natural long chain monogalactosyldiacylglycerol extracted from leek leaves (991+/-85U/mg). It is the microbial enzyme with the highest activity on galactolipids identified so far with a level of activity comparable to that of pancreatic lipase-related protein 2. FSL maximum activity on galactolipids was measured at pH8. The analysis of the hydrolysis product of natural MGDG from leek showed that FSL hydrolyzes preferentially the ester bond at the sn-1 position of galactolipids. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of FSL, a 3D model of this enzyme was built. In silico docking of medium chains MGDG and DGDG and phospholipid in the active site of FSL reveals structural solutions which are in concordance with in vitro tests.
ESTHER : Jallouli_2015_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1851_282
PubMedSearch : Jallouli_2015_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1851_282
PubMedID: 25529980
Gene_locus related to this paper: nech7-c7yuz1

Title : Partial deletion of beta9 loop in pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 reduces enzyme activity with a larger effect on long acyl chain substrates - Dridi_2013_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1831_1293
Author(s) : Dridi K , Amara S , Bezzine S , Rodriguez JA , Carriere F , Gaussier H
Ref : Biochimica & Biophysica Acta , 1831 :1293 , 2013
Abstract : Structural studies on pancreatic lipase have revealed a complex architecture of surface loops surrounding the enzyme active site and potentially involved in interactions with lipids. Two of them, the lid and beta loop, expose a large hydrophobic surface and are considered as acyl chain binding sites based on their interaction with an alkyl phosphonate inhibitor. While the role of the lid in substrate recognition and selectivity has been extensively studied, the implication of beta9 loop in acyl chain stabilization remained hypothetical. The characterization of an enzyme with a natural deletion of the lid, guinea pig pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (GPLRP2), suggests however an essential contribution of the beta9 loop in the stabilization of the acyl enzyme intermediate formed during the lipolysis reaction. A GPLRP2 mutant with a seven-residue deletion of beta9 loop (GPLRP2-deltabeta9) was produced and its enzyme activity was measured using various substrates (triglycerides, monoglycerides, galactolipids, phospholipids, vinyl esters) with short, medium and long acyl chains. Whatever the substrate tested, GPLRP2-deltabeta9 activity is drastically reduced compared to that of wild-type GPLRP2 and this effect is more pronounced as the length of substrate acyl chain increases. Changes in relative substrate selectivity and stereoselectivity remained however weak. The deletion within beta9 loop has also a negative effect on the rate of enzyme inhibition by alkyl phosphonates. All these findings indicate that the reduced enzyme turnover observed with GPLRP2-deltabeta9 results from a weaker stabilization of the acyl enzyme intermediate due to a loss of hydrophobic interactions.
ESTHER : Dridi_2013_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1831_1293
PubMedSearch : Dridi_2013_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1831_1293
PubMedID: 24046870
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-PNLIPRP2

Title : Phospholipases: an overview - Aloulou_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_63
Author(s) : Aloulou A , Ben Ali Y , Bezzine S , Gargouri Y , Gelb MH
Ref : Methods Mol Biol , 861 :63 , 2012
Abstract : Phospholipids are present in all living organisms. They are a major component of all biological membranes, along with glycolipids and cholesterol. Enzymes aimed at cleaving the various bonds in phospholipids, namely phospholipases, are consequently widespread in nature, playing very diverse roles from aggression in snake venom to signal transduction, lipid mediators production, and digestion in humans. Although all phospholipases target phospholipids as substrates, they vary in the site of action on the phospholipids molecules, physiological function, mode of action, and their regulation. Significant studies on phospholipases characterization, physiological role, and industrial potential have been conducted worldwide. Some of them have been directed for biotechnological advances, such as gene discovery and functional enhancement by protein engineering. Others reported phospholipases as virulence factors and major causes of pathophysiological effects. In this introductory chapter, we provide brief details of different phospholipases.
ESTHER : Aloulou_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_63
PubMedSearch : Aloulou_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_63
PubMedID: 22426712

Title : Phospholipase A2 purification and characterization: a case study - Karray_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_283
Author(s) : Karray A , Gargouri Y , Verger R , Bezzine S
Ref : Methods Mol Biol , 861 :283 , 2012
Abstract : We compared here the purification procedures, the pH, the calcium, the bile salts, and the temperature dependencies as well as the catalytic activities on phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) of two purified secreted PLA2 from chicken pancreatic (ChPLA2-IB) and chicken intestinal (ChPLA2-IIA) origins. Interestingly, ChPLA2-IB hydrolyzes efficiently both purified PC and PE, whereas ChPLA2-IIA hydrolyzes only PE and not PC, even after a long incubation period. These analytical results clearly indicate that the catalytic activity of ChPLA2-IIA, measured with the pH-stat and using egg yolk as substrate, is mainly due to the hydrolysis of the PE fraction present in egg yolk.
ESTHER : Karray_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_283
PubMedSearch : Karray_2012_Methods.Mol.Biol_861_283
PubMedID: 22426725

Title : Purification and characterization of the first reptile pancreatic lipase: the turtle - Kammoun_2008_Pancreas_36_302
Author(s) : Kammoun M , Gargouri Y , Bezzine S
Ref : Pancreas , 36 :302 , 2008
Abstract : OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to purify and characterize classic pancreatic lipase from the reptile turtle (TuPL).
METHODS: The lipase was purified from the fresh pancreas extract followed by diethylamino ethyl-cellulose chromatography, Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, and a Mono-Q Sepharose chromatography.
RESULTS: Turtle pancreatic lipase is a serine enzyme and it contains only 1 free cysteine. Its activity is maximum at pH 8.2 and 37 degrees C. A specific activity of 10.000 U/mg and 5.000 U/mg were measured titrimetrically on tributyrin and olive oil emulsion, respectively. Natural detergents act as potent inhibitors of TuPL, and colipase restores the activity. When the lipase is inhibited by synthetic detergent, simultaneous addition of colipase and bile salts is required to restore the TuPL activity. The critical surface pressure of TuPL (pi(c)) = 20.9 mN m(-1)) is similar to the one of human PL (pi(c) = 18 mN m(-1)).
CONCLUSIONS: The results presented in this article indicate that despite the primitive character of the turtle, no significant difference has been observed between TuPL and known mammalian PLs. However, partial proteolysis of TuPL with chymotrypsin shows the absence of the 14-kDa fragment identified as the C-terminal domain in the case of many classic PLs.
ESTHER : Kammoun_2008_Pancreas_36_302
PubMedSearch : Kammoun_2008_Pancreas_36_302
PubMedID: 18362845

Title : Expression, purification, and characterization of His-tagged Staphylococcus xylosus lipase wild-type and its mutant Asp 290 Ala - Mosbah_2006_Protein.Expr.Purif_47_516
Author(s) : Mosbah H , Sayari A , Bezzine S , Gargouri Y
Ref : Protein Expr Purif , 47 :516 , 2006
Abstract : The gene encoding the extracellular lipase of Staphylococcus xylosus (SXL) was cloned using PCR technique. The sequence corresponding to the mature lipase was subcloned in the pET-14b expression vector, with a strong T7 promoter, to construct a recombinant lipase protein containing six histidine residues at the N-terminal. High level expression of the lipase by Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells harbouring the lipase gene containing expression vector was observed upon induction with 0.4 mM IPTG at 37 degrees C. One-step purification of the recombinant lipase was achieved with Ni-NTA resin. The specific activity of the purified His-tagged SXL was 1500 or 850 U/mg using tributyrin or olive oil emulsion as substrate, respectively. It has been proposed that the region near the residue Asp290 could be involved in the selection of the substrate. Therefore, we also mutated the residue Asp 290 by Ala using site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant SXL-D290A was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified with the same nickel metal affinity column. The specific activity of the purified His-tagged SXL-D290A mutant was 1000 U/mg using either tributyrin or olive oil emulsion as substrate. A comparative study of the wild type (His(6)-SXL) and the mutant (His(6)-SXL-D290A) proteins was carried out. Our results confirmed that Asp290 is important for the chain length specificity and catalytic efficiency of the enzyme.
ESTHER : Mosbah_2006_Protein.Expr.Purif_47_516
PubMedSearch : Mosbah_2006_Protein.Expr.Purif_47_516
PubMedID: 16380267

Title : The beta 5' loop of the pancreatic lipase C2-like domain plays a critical role in the lipase-lipid interactions - Chahinian_2002_Biochemistry_41_13725
Author(s) : Chahinian H , Bezzine S , Ferrato F , Ivanova MG , Perez B , Lowe ME , Carriere F
Ref : Biochemistry , 41 :13725 , 2002
Abstract : The structural similarities between the C-terminal domain of human pancreatic lipase (C-HPL) and C2 domains suggested a similar function, the interaction with lipids. The catalytic N-terminal domain (N-HPL) and C-HPL were produced as individual proteins, and their partitioning between the water phase and the triglyceride-water interface was assessed using trioctanoin emulsions (TC8). N-HPL did not bind efficiently to TC8 and was inactive. C-HPL did bind to TC8 and to a phospholipid monolayer with a critical surface pressure of penetration similar to that of HPL (15 mN m(-1)). These experiments, performed in the absence of colipase and bile salts, support an absolute requirement of C-HPL for interfacial binding of HPL. To refine our analysis, we determined the contribution to lipid interactions of a hydrophobic loop (beta 5') in C-HPL by investigating a HPL mutant in which beta 5' loop hydrophobicity was increased by introducing the homologous lipoprotein lipase (LPL) beta 5' loop. This mutant (HPL-beta 5'LPL) penetrated into phospholipid monolayers at higher surface pressures than HPL, and its level of binding to TC8 was higher than that of HPL in the presence of serum albumin (BSA), an inhibitory protein that competes with HPL for interfacial adsorption. The beta 5' loop of LPL is therefore tailored for an optimal interaction with the surface of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (VLDL and chylomicrons) containing phospholipids and apoproteins. These observations support a major contribution of the beta 5' loop in the interaction of LPL and HPL with their respective substrates.
ESTHER : Chahinian_2002_Biochemistry_41_13725
PubMedSearch : Chahinian_2002_Biochemistry_41_13725
PubMedID: 12427035

Title : Human pancreatic lipase: colipase dependence and interfacial binding of lid domain mutants - Bezzine_1999_Biochemistry_38_5499
Author(s) : Bezzine S , Ferrato F , Ivanova MG , Lopez V , Verger R , Carriere F
Ref : Biochemistry , 38 :5499 , 1999
Abstract : Five key amino acid residues from human pancreatic lipase (HPL) are mutated in some pancreatic lipase-related proteins 2 (PLRP2) that are not reactivated by colipase in the presence of bile salts. One of these residues (Y403) is involved in a direct interaction between the HPL C-terminal domain and colipase. The other four residues (R256, D257, Y267, and K268) are involved in the interactions stabilizing the open conformation of the lid domain, which also interacts with colipase. Here we produced and characterized three HPL mutants: HPL Y403N, an HPL four-site mutant (R256G, D257G, Y267F, and K268E), and an HPL five-site mutant (R256G, D257G, Y267F, K268E, and Y403N), in which the HPL amino acids were replaced by those present in human PLRP2. Colipase reactivated both the HPL Y403N mutant and HPL, and Y403 is therefore not essential for lipase-colipase interactions. Both the HPL four-site and five-site mutants showed low activity on trioctanoin, were inhibited by bile salts (sodium taurodeoxycholate, NaTDC) and were not reactivated by colipase. The interfacial binding of the HPL four-site mutant to a trioctanoin emulsion was suppressed in the presence of 4 mM NaTDC and was not restored by addition of colipase. Protein blotting/protein overlay immunoassay revealed that the HPL four-site mutant-colipase interactions are not abolished, and therefore, the absence of reactivation of the HPL four-site mutant is probably due to a lid domain conformation that prevents the interfacial binding of the lipase-colipase complex. The effects of colipase were also studied with HPL(-lid), an HPL mutant showing an 18-residue deletion within the lid domain, which therefore has only one colipase interaction site. HPL(-lid) showed a low activity on trioctanoin, was inhibited by bile salts, and recovered its lipase activity in the presence of colipase. Reactivation of HPL(-lid) by colipase was associated with a strong interfacial binding of the mutant to a trioctanoin emulsion. The lid domain is therefore not essential for either the interfacial binding of HPL or the lipase-colipase interactions.
ESTHER : Bezzine_1999_Biochemistry_38_5499
PubMedSearch : Bezzine_1999_Biochemistry_38_5499
PubMedID: 10220337

Title : Colipase: structure and interaction with pancreatic lipase - van Tilbeurgh_1999_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1441_173
Author(s) : van Tilbeurgh H , Bezzine S , Cambillau C , Verger R , Carriere F
Ref : Biochimica & Biophysica Acta , 1441 :173 , 1999
Abstract : Colipase is a small protein cofactor needed by pancreatic lipase for the efficient dietary lipid hydrolysis. It binds to the C-terminal, non-catalytic domain of lipase, thereby stabilising an active conformation and considerably increasing the overall hydrophobic binding site. Structural studies of the complex and of colipase alone have clearly revealed the functionality of its architecture. Interestingly, a structural analogy has recently been discovered between colipase and a domain in a developmental protein (Dickkopf), based on sequence analogy and homology modeling. Whether this structural analogy implies a common function (lipid interaction) remains to be clarified. Structural analogies have also been recognised between the pancreatic lipase C-terminal domain, the N-terminal domains of lipoxygenases and the C-terminal domain of alpha-toxin. These non-catalytic domains in the latter enzymes are important for interaction with membranes. It has not been established if these domains are also involved in eventual protein cofactor binding as is the case for pancreatic lipase.
ESTHER : van Tilbeurgh_1999_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1441_173
PubMedSearch : van Tilbeurgh_1999_Biochim.Biophys.Acta_1441_173
PubMedID: 10570245

Title : Reactivation of the totally inactive pancreatic lipase RP1 by structure-predicted point mutations - Roussel_1998_Proteins_32_523
Author(s) : Roussel A , De Caro J , Bezzine S , Gastinel L , de Caro A , Carriere F , Leydier S , Verger R , Cambillau C
Ref : Proteins , 32 :523 , 1998
Abstract : Both classical pancreatic lipase (DPL) and pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 (DPLRP1) have been found to be secreted by dog exocrine pancreas. These two proteins were purified to homogeneity from canine pancreatic juice and no significant catalytic activity was observed with dog PLRP1 on any of the substrates tested: di- and tri-glycerides, phospholipids, etc. DPLRP1 was crystallized and its structure solved by molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.10 A. Its structure is similar to that of the classical PL structures in the absence of any inhibitors or micelles. The lid domain that controls the access to the active site was found to have a closed conformation. An amino-acid substitution (Ala 178 Val) in the DPLRP1 may result in a steric clash with one of the acyl chains observed in the structures of a C11 alkyl phosphonate inhibitor, a transition state analogue, bound to the classical PL. This substitution was suspected of being responsible for the absence of DPLRP1 activity. The presence of Val and Ala residues in positions 178 and 180, respectively, are characteristic of all the known PLRP1, whereas Ala and Pro residues are always present in the same positions in all the other members of the PL gene family. Introducing the double mutation Val 178 Ala and Ala 180 Pro into the human pancreatic RP1 (HPLRP1) gene yielded a well expressed and folded enzyme in insect cells. This enzyme is kinetically active on triglycerides. Our findings on DPLRP1 and HPLRP1 are therefore likely to apply to all the RP1 lipases.
ESTHER : Roussel_1998_Proteins_32_523
PubMedSearch : Roussel_1998_Proteins_32_523
PubMedID: 9726421
Gene_locus related to this paper: canfa-1plip

Title : Human pancreatic lipase: an exposed hydrophobic loop from the C-terminal domain may contribute to interfacial binding - Bezzine_1998_Biochemistry_37_11846
Author(s) : Bezzine S , Carriere F , De Caro J , Verger R , de Caro A
Ref : Biochemistry , 37 :11846 , 1998
Abstract : Epitope mapping was performed using four anti-HPL monoclonal antibodies (mAb's 81-23, 146-40, 315-25, and 320-24) directed against human pancreatic lipase (HPL). Three HPL mutants produced in insect cells were tested for this purpose: (i) N-HPL, which consists of only the N-terminal domain of HPL, (ii) HPL(-lid), in which a short loop consisting of 5 amino acid residues replaces the full-length 23-residue lid domain present in HPL, and (iii) N-GPLRP2/C-HPL chimera, a chimeric mutant consisting of the N-terminal domain of the guinea pig pancreatic lipase related protein 2 (GPLRP2) fused to the C-terminal domain of HPL. The C-terminal domain of HPL (C-HPL) was prepared in a pure form after performing chymotryptic digestion of HPL. The mAb 146-40 recognizes HPL, HPL(-lid), and N-HPL but not GPLRP2, N-GPLRP2/C-HPL chimera, or the C-HPL. The antibody mAb 146-40 therefore specifically recognizes the N-terminal domain of HPL, and the epitope recognized does not include the amphiphilic lid. On the other hand, mAb's 81-23, 315-25, and 320-24 react specifically to the C-terminal domain of HPL, since they recognize HPL, HPL(-lid), the N-GPLRP2/C-HPL chimera, and the C-HPL but not N-HPL or GPLRP2. It was further established that these three mAb's recognize the same conformational epitope, the structure of which is stabilized by the N-terminal domain in the presence of SDS at concentrations greater than its critical micellar concentration. This conformational epitope was found to be located in the vicinity of Met 397 and Arg 414. These two residues delineate a highly exposed peptide stretch extending from the HPL C-terminal domain, which includes a hydrophobic surface loop (beta5'). Kinetic studies on the HPL/mAb's complexes showed that the lipase activity was much lower in these complexes than in HPL. The results of the present study suggest for the first time that the beta5' loop from the C-terminal domain may be involved in the interaction of HPL with a lipid/water interface.
ESTHER : Bezzine_1998_Biochemistry_37_11846
PubMedSearch : Bezzine_1998_Biochemistry_37_11846
PubMedID: 9718307

Title : An inactive pancreatic lipase-related protein is activated into a triglyceride-lipase by mutagenesis based on the 3-D structure - Bezzine_1998_Chem.Phys.Lipids_93_103
Author(s) : Bezzine S , Roussel A , De Caro J , Gastinel L , de Caro A , Carriere F , Leydier S , Verger R , Cambillau C
Ref : Chemistry & Physic of Lipids , 93 :103 , 1998
Abstract : Both classical dog pancreatic lipase (DPL) and dog pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 (DPLRP1) have been found to be secreted by the exocrine pancreas. These two proteins were purified to homogeneity from canine pancreatic juice and no significant catalytic activity was observed with DPLRP1 on any of the substrates tested: di- and tri-glycerides; phospholipids (PC); etc. DPLRP1 was crystallized and its structure solved by molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.10 A. Its structure is similar to that of the classical pancreatic lipase (PL) structures determined in the absence of any inhibitors or micelles. The lid domain that controls the access to the active site was found to have a closed conformation. An amino-acid substitution (Ala 178 Val) in the DPLRP1 was suspected of being responsible for the absence of enzymatic activity by inducing a steric clash with one of the acyl chain observed in the structures of chiral C11 alkyl phosphonate inhibitors, bound to the classical PL. The presence of Val and Ala residues in positions 178 and 180, respectively, are characteristic of the three known pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 (PLRP1), whereas Ala and Pro residues are always present at the same positions in all the other members of the PL gene family. Introducing the double mutation Val 178 Ala and Ala 180 Pro into the human pancreatic-related protein 1 (HPLRP1) gene yielded a well expressed and folded enzyme in insect cells. This enzyme is kinetically active on tributyrin (1800 U/mg) as well as trioctanoin (2250 U/mg) and its activity is low in the presence of taurodeoxycholate and stimulated in the presence of colipase. Our findings on DPLRP1 and HPLRP1 are therefore likely to apply to all the PLRP1 lipases.
ESTHER : Bezzine_1998_Chem.Phys.Lipids_93_103
PubMedSearch : Bezzine_1998_Chem.Phys.Lipids_93_103
PubMedID: 9720253