Ruyter-Spira C

References (4)

Title : The tomato MAX1 homolog, SlMAX1, is involved in the biosynthesis of tomato strigolactones from carlactone - Zhang_2018_New.Phytol_219_297
Author(s) : Zhang Y , Cheng X , Wang Y , Diez-Simon C , Flokova K , Bimbo A , Bouwmeester HJ , Ruyter-Spira C
Ref : New Phytol , 219 :297 , 2018
Abstract : Strigolactones (SLs) are rhizosphere signalling molecules exuded by plants that induce seed germination of root parasitic weeds and hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhiza. They are also phytohormones regulating plant architecture. MORE AXILLARY GROWTH 1 (MAX1) and its homologs encode cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes that catalyse the conversion of the strigolactone precursor carlactone to canonical strigolactones in rice (Oryza sativa), and to an SL-like compound in Arabidopsis. Here, we characterized the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MAX1 homolog, SlMAX1. The targeting induced local lesions in genomes method was used to obtain Slmax1 mutants that exhibit strongly reduced production of orobanchol, solanacol and didehydro-orobanchol (DDH) isomers. This results in a severe strigolactone mutant phenotype in vegetative and reproductive development. Transient expression of SlMAX1 - together with SlD27, SlCCD7 and SlCCD8 - in Nicotiana benthamiana showed that SlMAX1 catalyses the formation of carlactonoic acid from carlactone. Plant feeding assays showed that carlactone, but not 4-deoxy-orobanchol, is the precursor of orobanchol, which in turn is the precursor of solanacol and two of the three DDH isomers. Inhibitor studies suggest that a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase is involved in orobanchol biosynthesis from carlactone and that the formation of solanacol and DDH isomers from orobanchol is catalysed by CYPs.
ESTHER : Zhang_2018_New.Phytol_219_297
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2018_New.Phytol_219_297
PubMedID: 29655242

Title : Differential activity of Striga hermonthica seed germination stimulants and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching factors in rice and their contribution to underground communication - Cardoso_2014_PLoS.One_9_e104201
Author(s) : Cardoso C , Charnikhova T , Jamil M , Delaux PM , Verstappen F , Amini M , Lauressergues D , Ruyter-Spira C , Bouwmeester H
Ref : PLoS ONE , 9 :e104201 , 2014
Abstract : Strigolactones (SLs) trigger germination of parasitic plant seeds and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. There is extensive structural variation in SLs and plants usually produce blends of different SLs. The structural variation among natural SLs has been shown to impact their biological activity as hyphal branching and parasitic plant seed germination stimulants. In this study, rice root exudates were fractioned by HPLC. The resulting fractions were analyzed by MRM-LC-MS to investigate the presence of SLs and tested using bioassays to assess their Striga hermonthica seed germination and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching stimulatory activities. A substantial number of active fractions were revealed often with very different effect on seed germination and hyphal branching. Fractions containing (-)-orobanchol and ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol contributed little to the induction of S. hermonthica seed germination but strongly stimulated AM fungal hyphal branching. Three SLs in one fraction, putative methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers, had moderate seed germination and hyphal branching inducing activity. Two fractions contained strong germination stimulants but displayed only modest hyphal branching activity. We provide evidence that these stimulants are likely SLs although no SL-representative masses could be detected using MRM-LC-MS. Our results show that seed germination and hyphal branching are induced to very different extents by the various SLs (or other stimulants) present in rice root exudates. We propose that the development of rice varieties with different SL composition is a promising strategy to reduce parasitic plant infestation while maintaining symbiosis with AM fungi.
ESTHER : Cardoso_2014_PLoS.One_9_e104201
PubMedSearch : Cardoso_2014_PLoS.One_9_e104201
PubMedID: 25126953

Title : Rice cytochrome P450 MAX1 homologs catalyze distinct steps in strigolactone biosynthesis - Zhang_2014_Nat.Chem.Biol_10_1028
Author(s) : Zhang Y , van Dijk AD , Scaffidi A , Flematti GR , Hofmann M , Charnikhova T , Verstappen F , Hepworth J , van der Krol S , Leyser O , Smith SM , Zwanenburg B , Al-Babili S , Ruyter-Spira C , Bouwmeester HJ
Ref : Nat Chemical Biology , 10 :1028 , 2014
Abstract : Strigolactones (SLs) are a class of phytohormones and rhizosphere signaling compounds with high structural diversity. Three enzymes, carotenoid isomerase DWARF27 and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8, were previously shown to convert all-trans-beta-carotene to carlactone (CL), the SL precursor. However, how CL is metabolized to SLs has remained elusive. Here, by reconstituting the SL biosynthetic pathway in Nicotiana benthamiana, we show that a rice homolog of Arabidopsis More Axillary Growth 1 (MAX1), encodes a cytochrome P450 CYP711 subfamily member that acts as a CL oxidase to stereoselectively convert CL into ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol (B-C lactone ring formation), the presumed precursor of rice SLs. A protein encoded by a second rice MAX1 homolog then catalyzes the conversion of ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol to orobanchol. We therefore report that two members of CYP711 enzymes can catalyze two distinct steps in SL biosynthesis, identifying the first enzymes involved in B-C ring closure and a subsequent structural diversification step of SLs.
ESTHER : Zhang_2014_Nat.Chem.Biol_10_1028
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2014_Nat.Chem.Biol_10_1028
PubMedID: 25344813

Title : Strigolactones are transported through the xylem and play a key role in shoot architectural response to phosphate deficiency in nonarbuscular mycorrhizal host Arabidopsis - Kohlen_2011_Plant.Physiol_155_974
Author(s) : Kohlen W , Charnikhova T , Liu Q , Bours R , Domagalska MA , Beguerie S , Verstappen F , Leyser O , Bouwmeester H , Ruyter-Spira C
Ref : Plant Physiol , 155 :974 , 2011
Abstract : The biosynthesis of the recently identified novel class of plant hormones, strigolactones, is up-regulated upon phosphate deficiency in many plant species. It is generally accepted that the evolutionary origin of strigolactone up-regulation is their function as a rhizosphere signal that stimulates hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this work, we demonstrate that this induction is conserved in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), although Arabidopsis is not a host for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We demonstrate that the increase in strigolactone production contributes to the changes in shoot architecture observed in response to phosphate deficiency. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, column chromatography, and multiple reaction monitoring-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we identified two strigolactones (orobanchol and orobanchyl acetate) in Arabidopsis and have evidence of the presence of a third (5-deoxystrigol). We show that at least one of them (orobanchol) is strongly reduced in the putative strigolactone biosynthetic mutants more axillary growth1 (max1) and max4 but not in the signal transduction mutant max2. Orobanchol was also detected in xylem sap and up-regulated under phosphate deficiency, which is consistent with the idea that root-derived strigolactones are transported to the shoot, where they regulate branching. Moreover, two additional putative strigolactone-like compounds were detected in xylem sap, one of which was not detected in root exudates. Together, these results show that xylem-transported strigolactones contribute to the regulation of shoot architectural response to phosphate-limiting conditions.
ESTHER : Kohlen_2011_Plant.Physiol_155_974
PubMedSearch : Kohlen_2011_Plant.Physiol_155_974
PubMedID: 21119045