Sharman JL

References (4)

Title : THE CONCISE GUIDE TO PHARMACOLOGY 2019\/20: Enzymes - Alexander_2019_Br.J.Pharmacol_176 Suppl 1_S297
Author(s) : Alexander SPH , Fabbro D , Kelly E , Mathie A , Peters JA , Veale EL , Armstrong JF , Faccenda E , Harding SD , Pawson AJ , Sharman JL , Southan C , Davies JA
Ref : British Journal of Pharmacology , 176 Suppl 1 :S297 , 2019
Abstract : The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2019/20 is the fourth in this series of biennial publications. The Concise Guide provides concise overviews of the key properties of nearly 1800 human drug targets with an emphasis on selective pharmacology (where available), plus links to the open access knowledgebase source of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. Although the Concise Guide represents approximately 400 pages, the material presented is substantially reduced compared to information and links presented on the website. It provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. The full contents of this section can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.14752. Enzymes are one of the six major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being: G protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The landscape format of the Concise Guide is designed to facilitate comparison of related targets from material contemporary to mid-2019, and supersedes data presented in the 2017/18, 2015/16 and 2013/14 Concise Guides and previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in close conjunction with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR), therefore, providing official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate.
ESTHER : Alexander_2019_Br.J.Pharmacol_176 Suppl 1_S297
PubMedSearch : Alexander_2019_Br.J.Pharmacol_176 Suppl 1_S297
PubMedID: 31710714

Title : THE CONCISE GUIDE TO PHARMACOLOGY 2017\/18: Overview - Alexander_2017_Br.J.Pharmacol_174 Suppl 1_S1
Author(s) : Alexander SP , Kelly E , Marrion NV , Peters JA , Faccenda E , Harding SD , Pawson AJ , Sharman JL , Southan C , Buneman OP , Cidlowski JA , Christopoulos A , Davenport AP , Fabbro D , Spedding M , Striessnig J , Davies JA
Ref : British Journal of Pharmacology , 174 Suppl 1 :S1 , 2017
Abstract : The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2017/18 is the third in this series of biennial publications. This version provides concise overviews of the key properties of nearly 1800 human drug targets with an emphasis on selective pharmacology (where available), plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. Although the Concise Guide represents approximately 400 pages, the material presented is substantially reduced compared to information and links presented on the website. It provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. The full contents of this section can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.13882/full. In addition to this overview, in which are identified 'Other protein targets' which fall outside of the subsequent categorisation, there are eight areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-gated ion channels, other ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors, enzymes and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. The landscape format of the Concise Guide is designed to facilitate comparison of related targets from material contemporary to mid-2017, and supersedes data presented in the 2015/16 and 2013/14 Concise Guides and previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in close conjunction with the Nomenclature Committee of the Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (NC-IUPHAR), therefore, providing official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate.
ESTHER : Alexander_2017_Br.J.Pharmacol_174 Suppl 1_S1
PubMedSearch : Alexander_2017_Br.J.Pharmacol_174 Suppl 1_S1
PubMedID: 29055037

Title : Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat - Babbitt_2015_Database.(Oxford)_2015_bav063
Author(s) : Babbitt PC , Bagos PG , Bairoch A , Bateman A , Chatonnet A , Chen MJ , Craik DJ , Finn RD , Gloriam D , Haft DH , Henrissat B , Holliday GL , Isberg V , Kaas Q , Landsman D , Lenfant N , Manning G , Nagano N , Srinivasan N , O'Donovan C , Pruitt KD , Sowdhamini R , Rawlings ND , Saier MH, Jr. , Sharman JL , Spedding M , Tsirigos KD , Vastermark A , Vriend G
Ref : Database (Oxford) , 2015 :bav063 , 2015
Abstract : During 11-12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from protein databases from the large Bioinformatics centres (including UniProt and RefSeq). The retreat was divided into five sessions: (1) key challenges, (2) the databases represented, (3) best practices for maintenance and curation, (4) information flow to and from large data centers and (5) communication and funding. An important outcome of this meeting was the creation of a Specialist Protein Resource Network that we believe will improve coordination of the activities of its member resources. We invite further protein database resources to join the network and continue the dialogue.
ESTHER : Babbitt_2015_Database.(Oxford)_2015_bav063
PubMedSearch : Babbitt_2015_Database.(Oxford)_2015_bav063
PubMedID: 26284514

Title : International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G protein-coupled receptor list: recommendations for new pairings with cognate ligands - Davenport_2013_Pharmacol.Rev_65_967
Author(s) : Davenport AP , Alexander SP , Sharman JL , Pawson AJ , Benson HE , Monaghan AE , Liew WC , Mpamhanga CP , Bonner TI , Neubig RR , Pin JP , Spedding M , Harmar AJ
Ref : Pharmacol Rev , 65 :967 , 2013
Abstract : In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA(1) (GPR81) with lactate, HCA(2) (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA(3) (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA(4) (GPR23), LPA(5) (GPR92), LPA(6) (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http:\/\/www.iuphar-db.org).
ESTHER : Davenport_2013_Pharmacol.Rev_65_967
PubMedSearch : Davenport_2013_Pharmacol.Rev_65_967
PubMedID: 23686350