Volzke H

References (4)

Title : The relationship between homoarginine and liver biomarkers: a combination of epidemiological and clinical studies - Aghdassi_2023_Sci.Rep_13_5230
Author(s) : Aghdassi A , Schwedhelm E , Atzler D , Nauck M , Kuhn JP , Kromrey ML , Volzke H , Felix SB , Dorr M , Ittermann T , Bahls M
Ref : Sci Rep , 13 :5230 , 2023
Abstract : Homoarginine (hArg) is a non-essential cationic amino acid which inhibits hepatic alkaline phosphatases to exert inhibitory effects on bile secretion by targeting intrahepatic biliary epithelium. We analyzed (1) the relationship between hArg and liver biomarkers in two large population-based studies and (2) the impact of hArg supplementation on liver biomarkers. We assessed the relationship between alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatases (AP), albumin, total bilirubin, cholinesterase, Quick's value, liver fat, and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) and hArg in appropriately adjusted linear regression models. We analyzed the effect of L-hArg supplemention (125 mg L-hArg daily for 4 weeks) on these liver biomarkers. We included 7638 individuals (men: 3705; premenopausal women: 1866, postmenopausal women: 2067). We found positive associations for hArg and ALT (beta 0.38 microkatal/L 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29; 0.48), AST (beta 0.29 microkatal/L 95% CI 0.17; 0.41), GGT (beta 0.033 microkatal/L 95% CI 0.014; 0.053), Fib-4 score (beta 0.08 95% CI 0.03; 0.13), liver fat content (beta 0.016% 95% CI 0.006; 0.026), albumin (beta 0.030 g/L 95% CI 0.019; 0.040), and cholinesterase (beta 0.003 microkatal/L 95% CI 0.002; 0.004) in males. In premenopausal women hArg was positively related with liver fat content (beta 0.047% 95%CI 0.013; 0.080) and inversely with albumin (beta - 0.057 g/L 95% CI - 0.073; - 0.041). In postmenopausal women hARG was positively associated with AST (beta 0.26 microkatal/L 95% CI 0.11; 0.42). hArg supplementation did not affect liver biomarkers. We summarize that hArg may be a marker of liver dysfunction and should be explored further.
ESTHER : Aghdassi_2023_Sci.Rep_13_5230
PubMedSearch : Aghdassi_2023_Sci.Rep_13_5230
PubMedID: 36997574

Title : Distinct loci in the CHRNA5\/CHRNA3\/CHRNB4 gene cluster are associated with onset of regular smoking - Stephens_2013_Genet.Epidemiol_37_846
Author(s) : Stephens SH , Hartz SM , Hoft NR , Saccone NL , Corley RC , Hewitt JK , Hopfer CJ , Breslau N , Coon H , Chen X , Ducci F , Dueker N , Franceschini N , Frank J , Han Y , Hansel NN , Jiang C , Korhonen T , Lind PA , Liu J , Lyytikainen LP , Michel M , Shaffer JR , Short SE , Sun J , Teumer A , Thompson JR , Vogelzangs N , Vink JM , Wenzlaff A , Wheeler W , Yang BZ , Aggen SH , Balmforth AJ , Baumeister SE , Beaty TH , Benjamin DJ , Bergen AW , Broms U , Cesarini D , Chatterjee N , Chen J , Cheng YC , Cichon S , Couper D , Cucca F , Dick D , Foroud T , Furberg H , Giegling I , Gillespie NA , Gu F , Hall AS , Hallfors J , Han S , Hartmann AM , Heikkila K , Hickie IB , Hottenga JJ , Jousilahti P , Kaakinen M , Kahonen M , Koellinger PD , Kittner S , Konte B , Landi MT , Laatikainen T , Leppert M , Levy SM , Mathias RA , McNeil DW , Medland SE , Montgomery GW , Murray T , Nauck M , North KE , Pare PD , Pergadia M , Ruczinski I , Salomaa V , Viikari J , Willemsen G , Barnes KC , Boerwinkle E , Boomsma DI , Caporaso N , Edenberg HJ , Francks C , Gelernter J , Grabe HJ , Hops H , Jarvelin MR , Johannesson M , Kendler KS , Lehtimaki T , Magnusson PK , Marazita ML , Marchini J , Mitchell BD , Nothen MM , Penninx BW , Raitakari O , Rietschel M , Rujescu D , Samani NJ , Schwartz AG , Shete S , Spitz M , Swan GE , Volzke H , Veijola J , Wei Q , Amos C , Cannon DS , Grucza R , Hatsukami D , Heath A , Johnson EO , Kaprio J , Madden P , Martin NG , Stevens VL , Weiss RB , Kraft P , Bierut LJ , Ehringer MA
Ref : Genet Epidemiol , 37 :846 , 2013
Abstract : Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associated with early behaviors, and/or (2) if additional statistically independent signals are important in early smoking. We focused on two phenotypes: age of tobacco initiation (AOI) and age of first regular tobacco use (AOS). This study included 56,034 subjects (41 groups) spanning nine countries and evaluated five SNPs including rs1948, rs16969968, rs578776, rs588765, and rs684513. Each dataset was analyzed using a centrally generated script. Meta-analyses were conducted from summary statistics. AOS yielded significant associations with SNPs rs578776 (beta = 0.02, P = 0.004), rs1948 (beta = 0.023, P = 0.018), and rs684513 (beta = 0.032, P = 0.017), indicating protective effects. There were no significant associations for the AOI phenotype. Importantly, rs16969968, the most replicated signal in this region for nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, and cotinine levels, was not associated with AOI (P = 0.59) or AOS (P = 0.92). These results provide important insight into the complexity of smoking behavior phenotypes, and suggest that association signals in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster affecting early smoking behaviors may be different from those affecting the mature nicotine dependence phenotype.
ESTHER : Stephens_2013_Genet.Epidemiol_37_846
PubMedSearch : Stephens_2013_Genet.Epidemiol_37_846
PubMedID: 24186853

Title : Increased genetic vulnerability to smoking at CHRNA5 in early-onset smokers - Hartz_2012_Arch.Gen.Psychiatry_69_854
Author(s) : Hartz SM , Short SE , Saccone NL , Culverhouse R , Chen L , Schwantes-An TH , Coon H , Han Y , Stephens SH , Sun J , Chen X , Ducci F , Dueker N , Franceschini N , Frank J , Geller F , Gubjartsson D , Hansel NN , Jiang C , Keskitalo-Vuokko K , Liu Z , Lyytikainen LP , Michel M , Rawal R , Rosenberger A , Scheet P , Shaffer JR , Teumer A , Thompson JR , Vink JM , Vogelzangs N , Wenzlaff AS , Wheeler W , Xiao X , Yang BZ , Aggen SH , Balmforth AJ , Baumeister SE , Beaty T , Bennett S , Bergen AW , Boyd HA , Broms U , Campbell H , Chatterjee N , Chen J , Cheng YC , Cichon S , Couper D , Cucca F , Dick DM , Foroud T , Furberg H , Giegling I , Gu F , Hall AS , Hallfors J , Han S , Hartmann AM , Hayward C , Heikkila K , Hewitt JK , Hottenga JJ , Jensen MK , Jousilahti P , Kaakinen M , Kittner SJ , Konte B , Korhonen T , Landi MT , Laatikainen T , Leppert M , Levy SM , Mathias RA , McNeil DW , Medland SE , Montgomery GW , Muley T , Murray T , Nauck M , North K , Pergadia M , Polasek O , Ramos EM , Ripatti S , Risch A , Ruczinski I , Rudan I , Salomaa V , Schlessinger D , Styrkarsdottir U , Terracciano A , Uda M , Willemsen G , Wu X , Abecasis G , Barnes K , Bickeboller H , Boerwinkle E , Boomsma DI , Caporaso N , Duan J , Edenberg HJ , Francks C , Gejman PV , Gelernter J , Grabe HJ , Hops H , Jarvelin MR , Viikari J , Kahonen M , Kendler KS , Lehtimaki T , Levinson DF , Marazita ML , Marchini J , Melbye M , Mitchell BD , Murray JC , Nothen MM , Penninx BW , Raitakari O , Rietschel M , Rujescu D , Samani NJ , Sanders AR , Schwartz AG , Shete S , Shi J , Spitz M , Stefansson K , Swan GE , Thorgeirsson T , Volzke H , Wei Q , Wichmann HE , Amos CI , Breslau N , Cannon DS , Ehringer M , Grucza R , Hatsukami D , Heath A , Johnson EO , Kaprio J , Madden P , Martin NG , Stevens VL , Stitzel JA , Weiss RB , Kraft P , Bierut LJ
Ref : Arch Gen Psychiatry , 69 :854 , 2012
Abstract : CONTEXT: Recent studies have shown an association between cigarettes per day (CPD) and a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism in CHRNA5, rs16969968. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the association between rs16969968 and smoking is modified by age at onset of regular smoking. DATA SOURCES: Primary data. STUDY SELECTION: Available genetic studies containing measures of CPD and the genotype of rs16969968 or its proxy. DATA EXTRACTION: Uniform statistical analysis scripts were run locally. Starting with 94,050 ever-smokers from 43 studies, we extracted the heavy smokers (CPD >20) and light smokers (CPD </=10) with age-at-onset information, reducing the sample size to 33,348. Each study was stratified into early-onset smokers (age at onset </=16 years) and late-onset smokers (age at onset >16 years), and a logistic regression of heavy vs light smoking with the rs16969968 genotype was computed for each stratum. Meta-analysis was performed within each age-at-onset stratum. DATA SYNTHESIS: Individuals with 1 risk allele at rs16969968 who were early-onset smokers were significantly more likely to be heavy smokers in adulthood (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.36-1.55; n = 13,843) than were carriers of the risk allele who were late-onset smokers (OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.21-1.33, n = 19,505) (P = .01). CONCLUSION: These results highlight an increased genetic vulnerability to smoking in early-onset smokers.
ESTHER : Hartz_2012_Arch.Gen.Psychiatry_69_854
PubMedSearch : Hartz_2012_Arch.Gen.Psychiatry_69_854
PubMedID: 22868939

Title : Prevalence and determinants of increased serum lipase levels in a general population - Volzke_2008_Pancreas_37_411
Author(s) : Volzke H , Ludemann J , Mayerle J , Kraft M , John U , Lerch MM
Ref : Pancreas , 37 :411 , 2008
Abstract : OBJECTIVES: There is little information on the prevalence of increased serum lipase levels and its determinants from population-based studies. The present study was performed to provide such information. METHODS: We used data from the 4275 subjects aged 20 to 79 years who were recruited for the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania. Serum lipase levels were determined colorimetrically; levels > or =3.17 micromol/s x l were considered increased. RESULTS: The prevalence of increased serum lipase levels was 3.4%. The prevalence of self-reported chronic pancreatitis in this population was 0.7%. Subjects with and without increased serum lipase levels did not differ with respect to symptoms indicative of pancreatitis including abdominal feeling of fullness, abdominal pain, nausea, and loss of weight. High serum lipase levels correlated with advanced age, increased serum creatinine levels, and use of steroids or enalapril. CONCLUSIONS: Increased serum lipase levels are unrelated to pancreatitis-related symptoms. Renal insufficiency and prevalent pancreatitis explain increased serum lipase levels in a minority of subjects. In clinical practice, drugs including steroids and enalapril should be excluded as cause of increased serum lipase levels. The predictive roleof lipase measurements with respect to other pancreatic or extrapancreatic disorders has to be investigated in cohort studies.
ESTHER : Volzke_2008_Pancreas_37_411
PubMedSearch : Volzke_2008_Pancreas_37_411
PubMedID: 18953254