Schuler MA

References (4)

Title : Genome of the long-living sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) - Ming_2013_Genome.Biol_14_R41
Author(s) : Ming R , VanBuren R , Liu Y , Yang M , Han Y , Li LT , Zhang Q , Kim MJ , Schatz MC , Campbell M , Li J , Bowers JE , Tang H , Lyons E , Ferguson AA , Narzisi G , Nelson DR , Blaby-Haas CE , Gschwend AR , Jiao Y , Der JP , Zeng F , Han J , Min XJ , Hudson KA , Singh R , Grennan AK , Karpowicz SJ , Watling JR , Ito K , Robinson SA , Hudson ME , Yu Q , Mockler TC , Carroll A , Zheng Y , Sunkar R , Jia R , Chen N , Arro J , Wai CM , Wafula E , Spence A , Xu L , Zhang J , Peery R , Haus MJ , Xiong W , Walsh JA , Wu J , Wang ML , Zhu YJ , Paull RE , Britt AB , Du C , Downie SR , Schuler MA , Michael TP , Long SP , Ort DR , Schopf JW , Gang DR , Jiang N , Yandell M , dePamphilis CW , Merchant SS , Paterson AH , Buchanan BB , Li S , Shen-Miller J
Ref : Genome Biol , 14 :R41 , 2013
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Sacred lotus is a basal eudicot with agricultural, medicinal, cultural and religious importance. It was domesticated in Asia about 7,000 years ago, and cultivated for its rhizomes and seeds as a food crop. It is particularly noted for its 1,300-year seed longevity and exceptional water repellency, known as the lotus effect. The latter property is due to the nanoscopic closely packed protuberances of its self-cleaning leaf surface, which have been adapted for the manufacture of a self-cleaning industrial paint, Lotusan. RESULTS: The genome of the China Antique variety of the sacred lotus was sequenced with Illumina and 454 technologies, at respective depths of 101x and 5.2x. The final assembly has a contig N50 of 38.8 kbp and a scaffold N50 of 3.4 Mbp, and covers 86.5% of the estimated 929 Mbp total genome size. The genome notably lacks the paleo-triplication observed in other eudicots, but reveals a lineage-specific duplication. The genome has evidence of slow evolution, with a 30% slower nucleotide mutation rate than observed in grape. Comparisons of the available sequenced genomes suggest a minimum gene set for vascular plants of 4,223 genes. Strikingly, the sacred lotus has 16 COG2132 multi-copper oxidase family proteins with root-specific expression; these are involved in root meristem phosphate starvation, reflecting adaptation to limited nutrient availability in an aquatic environment. CONCLUSIONS: The slow nucleotide substitution rate makes the sacred lotus a better resource than the current standard, grape, for reconstructing the pan-eudicot genome, and should therefore accelerate comparative analysis between eudicots and monocots.
ESTHER : Ming_2013_Genome.Biol_14_R41
PubMedSearch : Ming_2013_Genome.Biol_14_R41
PubMedID: 23663246
Gene_locus related to this paper: nelnu-a0a1u8aj84 , nelnu-a0a1u8bpe4 , nelnu-a0a1u7z9m9 , nelnu-a0a1u7ywy5 , nelnu-a0a1u8aik2 , nelnu-a0a1u7zmb5 , nelnu-a0a1u8a7m7 , nelnu-a0a1u8b0n9 , nelnu-a0a1u8b461 , nelnu-a0a1u7zzj3 , nelnu-a0a1u8ave7 , nelnu-a0a1u7yn26

Title : Molecular mechanisms of metabolic resistance to synthetic and natural xenobiotics - Li_2007_Annu.Rev.Entomol_52_231
Author(s) : Li X , Schuler MA , Berenbaum MR
Ref : Annual Review of Entomology , 52 :231 , 2007
Abstract : Xenobiotic resistance in insects has evolved predominantly by increasing the metabolic capability of detoxificative systems and/or reducing xenobiotic target site sensitivity. In contrast to the limited range of nucleotide changes that lead to target site insensitivity, many molecular mechanisms lead to enhancements in xenobiotic metabolism. The genomic changes that lead to amplification, overexpression, and coding sequence variation in the three major groups of genes encoding metabolic enzymes, i.e., cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), esterases, and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), are the focus of this review. A substantial number of the adaptive genomic changes associated with insecticide resistance that have been characterized to date are transposon mediated. Several lines of evidence suggest that P450 genes involved in insecticide resistance, and perhaps insecticide detoxification genes in general, may share an evolutionary association with genes involved in allelochemical metabolism. Differences in the selective regime imposed by allelochemicals and insecticides may account for the relative importance of regulatory or structural mutations in conferring resistance.
ESTHER : Li_2007_Annu.Rev.Entomol_52_231
PubMedSearch : Li_2007_Annu.Rev.Entomol_52_231
PubMedID: 16925478

Title : Mediation of pyrethroid insecticide toxicity to honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases - Johnson_2006_J.Econ.Entomol_99_1046
Author(s) : Johnson RM , Wen Z , Schuler MA , Berenbaum MR
Ref : J Econ Entomol , 99 :1046 , 2006
Abstract : Honey bees, Apis mellifera L., often thought to be extremely susceptible to insecticides in general, exhibit considerable variation in tolerance to pyrethroid insecticides. Although some pyrethroids, such as cyfluthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, are highly toxic to honey bees, the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate is low enough to warrant its use to control parasitic mites inside honey bee colonies. Metabolic insecticide resistance in other insects is mediated by three major groups of detoxifying enzymes: the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), the carboxylesterases (COEs), and the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). To test the role of metabolic detoxification in mediating the relatively low toxicity of tau-fluvalinate compared with more toxic pyrethroid insecticides, we examined the effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF), and diethyl maleate (DEM) on the toxicity of these pyrethroids. The toxicity of the three pyrethroids to bees was greatly synergized by the P450 inhibitor PBO and synergized at low levels by the carboxylesterase inhibitor DEF. Little synergism was observed with DEM. These results suggest that metabolic detoxification, especially that mediated by P450s, contributes significantly to honey bee tolerance of pyrethroid insecticides. The potent synergism between tau-fluvalinate and PBO suggests that P450s are especially important in the detoxification of this pyrethroid and explains the ability of honey bees to tolerate its presence.
ESTHER : Johnson_2006_J.Econ.Entomol_99_1046
PubMedSearch : Johnson_2006_J.Econ.Entomol_99_1046
PubMedID: 16937654

Title : A deficit of detoxification enzymes: pesticide sensitivity and environmental response in the honeybee - Claudianos_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_615
Author(s) : Claudianos C , Ranson H , Johnson RM , Biswas S , Schuler MA , Berenbaum MR , Feyereisen R , Oakeshott JG
Ref : Insect Molecular Biology , 15 :615 , 2006
Abstract : The honeybee genome has substantially fewer protein coding genes ( approximately 11 000 genes) than Drosophila melanogaster ( approximately 13 500) and Anopheles gambiae ( approximately 14 000). Some of the most marked differences occur in three superfamilies encoding xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes. Specifically there are only about half as many glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) and carboxyl/cholinesterases (CCEs) in the honeybee. This includes 10-fold or greater shortfalls in the numbers of Delta and Epsilon GSTs and CYP4 P450s, members of which clades have been recurrently associated with insecticide resistance in other species. These shortfalls may contribute to the sensitivity of the honeybee to insecticides. On the other hand there are some recent radiations in CYP6, CYP9 and certain CCE clades in A. mellifera that could be associated with the evolution of the hormonal and chemosensory processes underpinning its highly organized eusociality.
ESTHER : Claudianos_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_615
PubMedSearch : Claudianos_2006_Insect.Mol.Biol_15_615
PubMedID: 17069637
Gene_locus related to this paper: apime-b9vmq4 , apime-b9vmq5 , apime-b9vmq6 , apime-b9vmq7 , apime-a0a088atg1