Nakazawa H

References (15)

Title : Complete genome sequence of Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6, a degrader of lignin-derived biaryls and monoaryls - Masai_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_534
Author(s) : Masai E , Kamimura N , Kasai D , Oguchi A , Ankai A , Fukui S , Takahashi M , Yashiro I , Sasaki H , Harada T , Nakamura S , Katano Y , Narita-Yamada S , Nakazawa H , Hara H , Katayama Y , Fukuda M , Yamazaki S , Fujita N
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :534 , 2012
Abstract : Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to grow on an extensive variety of lignin-derived biaryls and monoaryls, and the catabolic genes for these compounds are useful for the production of industrially valuable metabolites from lignin. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the SYK-6 genome which consists of the 4,199,332-bp-long chromosome and the 148,801-bp-long plasmid.
ESTHER : Masai_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_534
PubMedSearch : Masai_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_534
PubMedID: 22207743
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9sphn-g2itm4 , 9sphn-g2iml3 , sphsk-g2ijj5

Title : Complete genome sequence of phototrophic betaproteobacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus IL144 - Nagashima_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3541
Author(s) : Nagashima S , Kamimura A , Shimizu T , Nakamura-Isaki S , Aono E , Sakamoto K , Ichikawa N , Nakazawa H , Sekine M , Yamazaki S , Fujita N , Shimada K , Hanada S , Nagashima KV
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :3541 , 2012
Abstract : Rubrivivax gelatinosus is a facultative photoheterotrophic betaproteobacterium living in freshwater ponds, sewage ditches, activated sludge, and food processing wastewater. There have not been many studies on photosynthetic betaproteobacteria. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the best-studied phototrophic betaproteobacterium, R. gelatinosus IL-144 (NBRC 100245).
ESTHER : Nagashima_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3541
PubMedSearch : Nagashima_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3541
PubMedID: 22689232
Gene_locus related to this paper: rubgi-i0hxc6

Title : Complete genome sequence of NBRC 3288, a unique cellulose-nonproducing strain of Gluconacetobacter xylinus isolated from vinegar - Ogino_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_6997
Author(s) : Ogino H , Azuma Y , Hosoyama A , Nakazawa H , Matsutani M , Hasegawa A , Otsuyama K , Matsushita K , Fujita N , Shirai M
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :6997 , 2011
Abstract : Gluconacetobacter xylinus is involved in the industrial production of cellulose. We have determined the genome sequence of G. xylinus NBRC 3288, a cellulose-nonproducing strain. Comparative analysis of genomes of G. xylinus NBRC 3288 with those of the cellulose-producing strains clarified the genes important for cellulose production in Gluconacetobacter.
ESTHER : Ogino_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_6997
PubMedSearch : Ogino_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_6997
PubMedID: 22123756
Gene_locus related to this paper: kommn-g2i1m7

Title : Whole genome sequence of Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1 revealed common gene clusters in magnetotactic bacteria - Nakazawa_2009_Genome.Res_19_1801
Author(s) : Nakazawa H , Arakaki A , Narita-Yamada S , Yashiro I , Jinno K , Aoki N , Tsuruyama A , Okamura Y , Tanikawa S , Fujita N , Takeyama H , Matsunaga T
Ref : Genome Res , 19 :1801 , 2009
Abstract : Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous microorganisms that synthesize intracellular magnetite particles (magnetosomes) by accumulating Fe ions from aquatic environments. Recent molecular studies, including comprehensive proteomic, transcriptomic, and genomic analyses, have considerably improved our hypotheses of the magnetosome-formation mechanism. However, most of these studies have been conducted using pure-cultured bacterial strains of alpha-proteobacteria. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1, the only isolate of magnetotactic microorganisms classified under delta-proteobacteria. Comparative genomics of the RS-1 and four alpha-proteobacterial strains revealed the presence of three separate gene regions (nuo and mamAB-like gene clusters, and gene region of a cryptic plasmid) conserved in all magnetotactic bacteria. The nuo gene cluster, encoding NADH dehydrogenase (complex I), was also common to the genomes of three iron-reducing bacteria exhibiting uncontrolled extracellular and/or intracellular magnetite synthesis. A cryptic plasmid, pDMC1, encodes three homologous genes that exhibit high similarities with those of other magnetotactic bacterial strains. In addition, the mamAB-like gene cluster, encoding the key components for magnetosome formation such as iron transport and magnetosome alignment, was conserved only in the genomes of magnetotactic bacteria as a similar genomic island-like structure. Our findings suggest the presence of core genetic components for magnetosome biosynthesis; these genes may have been acquired into the magnetotactic bacterial genomes by multiple gene-transfer events during proteobacterial evolution.
ESTHER : Nakazawa_2009_Genome.Res_19_1801
PubMedSearch : Nakazawa_2009_Genome.Res_19_1801
PubMedID: 19675025
Gene_locus related to this paper: desmr-c4xjz8 , desmr-c4xl23 , desmr-c4xq70 , desmr-c4xqs3 , desmr-c4xr42 , desmr-c4xr97 , desmr-metxa

Title : Application of dual counter-current chromatography for rapid sample preparation of N-methylcarbamate pesticides in vegetable oil and citrus fruit - Ito_2006_J.Chromatogr.A_1108_20
Author(s) : Ito Y , Goto T , Yamada S , Matsumoto H , Oka H , Takahashi N , Nakazawa H , Nagase H
Ref : Journal of Chromatography A , 1108 :20 , 2006
Abstract : Dual counter-current chromatography (dual CCC) has been successfully applied to rapid sample preparation for the simultaneous determination of residual carbaryl, fenobucarb and methomyl in vegetable oil and citrus fruit. The citrus fruit samples were extracted with n-hexane solution containing stable isotopically labeled internal standards (methomyl-d3, fenobucarb-d3 and carbaryl-d9), and applied to dual CCC using a two-phase solvent system of n-hexane-acetonitrile to purify the carbamate pesticides from aliphatic sample matrix. The coiled column was rotated at 420 rpm, the lower mobile phase was introduced through the head toward the tail, and the upper mobile phase in the opposite direction. Due to the high partition efficiency of dual CCC, the lower phase fraction collected from 2 to 5 min after injection could be subjected to flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry directly after concentration. Repetitive sample injection can be performed at high reproducibility without a risk of contamination from the compounds retained in the column.
ESTHER : Ito_2006_J.Chromatogr.A_1108_20
PubMedSearch : Ito_2006_J.Chromatogr.A_1108_20
PubMedID: 16445929

Title : Use of cholinesterase activity as an indicator for the effects of combinations of organophosphorus pesticides in water from environmental sources - Tahara_2005_Water.Res_39_5112
Author(s) : Tahara M , Kubota R , Nakazawa H , Tokunaga H , Nishimura T
Ref : Water Res , 39 :5112 , 2005
Abstract : Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) are commonly detected in agricultural products, animal-derived foodstuffs, and environmental samples. Until now, the focus of research has been to evaluate the adverse effect of a single OP. While each OP may be present at concentrations under recognized as "no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL)", the combined effects of multiple OPs present at these low concentrations have not been sufficiently studied. Therefore, we developed an in vitro testing method to evaluate the toxicity of multiple OPs based on the degree of inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) activity. This method requires only 10 min to complete and no specialized technology. We examined 15 OPs by this method and categorized them into three groups according to the degree of ChE inhibition. A relationship between the OPs' chemical structures and the degree of ChE inhibition emerged with the moiety -P-O-CN- showing the strongest action. The degree of ChE inhibition increased with multiple OPs, and the degree of inhibition seemed to be additive. These results demonstrate that the combined toxicity of multiple OPs present in food or environmental samples is an easily determined and toxicologically relevant measure of overall toxicity of complex OPs mixtures. It is possible to apply this testing method as a monitoring technique in water quality management in order to control OPs. As a result, this method can play the role for the potential risk reduction to the ecosystem and may contribute to the preservation of the environment.
ESTHER : Tahara_2005_Water.Res_39_5112
PubMedSearch : Tahara_2005_Water.Res_39_5112
PubMedID: 16310243

Title : A lipase isolated from the silkworm Bombyx mori shows antiviral activity against nucleopolyhedrovirus - Ponnuvel_2003_J.Virol_77_10725
Author(s) : Ponnuvel KM , Nakazawa H , Furukawa S , Asaoka A , Ishibashi J , Tanaka H , Yamakawa M
Ref : J Virol , 77 :10725 , 2003
Abstract : A protein showing strong antiviral activity against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) was purified from the digestive juice of B. mori larvae. A homology search of the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein cDNA revealed 56% homology with Drosophila melanogaster lipase and 21% homology with human lipase. As lipase activity of the protein was confirmed in vitro, this protein was designated Bmlipase-1. Northern blot analysis showed that the Bmlipase-1 gene is expressed in the midgut but not in other tissues, nor is it activated by BmNPV infection. In addition, the Bmlipase-1 gene was shown not to be expressed in the molting and wandering stages, indicating that the gene is hormonally regulated. Our results suggest that an insect digestive enzyme has potential as a physiological barrier against BmNPV at the initial site of viral infection.
ESTHER : Ponnuvel_2003_J.Virol_77_10725
PubMedSearch : Ponnuvel_2003_J.Virol_77_10725
PubMedID: 12970462
Gene_locus related to this paper: bommo-Q8MY66

Title : Genome sequence of an industrial microorganism Streptomyces avermitilis: deducing the ability of producing secondary metabolites - Omura_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_12215
Author(s) : Omura S , Ikeda H , Ishikawa J , Hanamoto A , Takahashi C , Shinose M , Takahashi Y , Horikawa H , Nakazawa H , Osonoe T , Kikuchi H , Shiba T , Sakaki Y , Hattori M
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :12215 , 2001
Abstract : Streptomyces avermitilis is a soil bacterium that carries out not only a complex morphological differentiation but also the production of secondary metabolites, one of which, avermectin, is commercially important in human and veterinary medicine. The major interest in this genus Streptomyces is the diversity of its production of secondary metabolites as an industrial microorganism. A major factor in its prominence as a producer of the variety of secondary metabolites is its possession of several metabolic pathways for biosynthesis. Here we report sequence analysis of S. avermitilis, covering 99% of its genome. At least 8.7 million base pairs exist in the linear chromosome; this is the largest bacterial genome sequence, and it provides insights into the intrinsic diversity of the production of the secondary metabolites of Streptomyces. Twenty-five kinds of secondary metabolite gene clusters were found in the genome of S. avermitilis. Four of them are concerned with the biosyntheses of melanin pigments, in which two clusters encode tyrosinase and its cofactor, another two encode an ochronotic pigment derived from homogentiginic acid, and another polyketide-derived melanin. The gene clusters for carotenoid and siderophore biosyntheses are composed of seven and five genes, respectively. There are eight kinds of gene clusters for type-I polyketide compound biosyntheses, and two clusters are involved in the biosyntheses of type-II polyketide-derived compounds. Furthermore, a polyketide synthase that resembles phloroglucinol synthase was detected. Eight clusters are involved in the biosyntheses of peptide compounds that are synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. These secondary metabolite clusters are widely located in the genome but half of them are near both ends of the genome. The total length of these clusters occupies about 6.4% of the genome.
ESTHER : Omura_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_12215
PubMedSearch : Omura_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_12215
PubMedID: 11572948
Gene_locus related to this paper: strav-cah , strav-GEOB , strav-OLMA7 , strav-OLMC , strav-PCAL , strav-PTEA5 , strav-PTEH , strav-Q93GY0 , strav-Q93GY7 , strav-Q93H00 , strav-Q93H03 , strav-Q93H41 , strav-Q93H55 , strav-Q93H68 , strav-Q93H73 , strav-Q93HG2 , strav-Q93HH2 , strav-Q93HH8 , strav-Q93HI2 , strav-SAV38 , strav-SAV141 , strav-SAV154 , strav-SAV297 , strav-SAV298 , strav-SAV299 , strav-SAV433 , strav-SAV469 , strav-SAV512 , strav-SAV519 , strav-SAV541 , strav-SAV569 , strav-SAV620 , strav-SAV819 , strav-SAV875 , strav-SAV888 , strav-SAV906 , strav-SAV923 , strav-SAV974 , strav-SAV1231 , strav-SAV1256 , strav-SAV1457 , strav-SAV1549 , strav-SAV1585 , strav-SAV1746 , strav-SAV1898 , strav-SAV1906 , strav-SAV1959 , strav-SAV1968 , strav-SAV1973 , strav-SAV2099 , strav-SAV2105 , strav-SAV2113 , strav-SAV2604 , strav-SAV2722 , strav-SAV3039 , strav-SAV3080 , strav-SAV3081 , strav-SAV3092 , strav-SAV3099 , strav-SAV3144 , strav-SAV3359 , strav-SAV3461 , strav-SAV3624 , strav-SAV3810 , strav-SAV3854 , strav-SAV4041 , strav-SAV4252 , strav-SAV4410 , strav-SAV4434 , strav-SAV4531 , strav-SAV4564 , strav-SAV4596 , strav-SAV4674 , strav-SAV4779 , strav-SAV4863 , strav-SAV4922 , strav-SAV4968 , strav-SAV5173 , strav-SAV5300 , strav-SAV5344 , strav-SAV5668 , strav-SAV5711 , strav-SAV5844 , strav-SAV5965 , strav-SAV6079 , strav-SAV6138 , strav-SAV6422 , strav-SAV6559 , strav-SAV6609 , strav-SAV7067 , strav-SAV7089 , strav-SAV7110 , strav-SAV7198 , strav-SAV7423 , strav-SAV7455 , strav-SAV7475 , strav-SLPD , straw-AVEG , straw-pepx , straw-q82bb0 , straw-q82en5 , straw-q82et1 , straw-q93hc9 , straw-SAV1543 , straw-SAV2023 , strax-Q93H72

Title : Complete genome sequence of an aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, Sulfolobus tokodaii strain7 - Kawarabayasi_2001_DNA.Res_8_123
Author(s) : Kawarabayasi Y , Hino Y , Horikawa H , Jin-no K , Takahashi M , Sekine M , Baba S , Ankai A , Kosugi H , Hosoyama A , Fukui S , Nagai Y , Nishijima K , Otsuka R , Nakazawa H , Takamiya M , Kato Y , Yoshizawa T , Tanaka T , Kudoh Y , Yamazaki J , Kushida N , Oguchi A , Aoki K , Masuda S , Yanagii M , Nishimura M , Yamagishi A , Oshima T , Kikuchi H
Ref : DNA Research , 8 :123 , 2001
Abstract : The complete genomic sequence of an aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, Sulfolobus tokodaii strain7 which optimally grows at 80 degrees C, at low pH, and under aerobic conditions, has been determined by the whole genome shotgun method with slight modifications. The genomic size was 2,694,756 bp long and the G + C content was 32.8%. The following RNA-coding genes were identified: a single 16S-23S rRNA cluster, one 5S rRNA gene and 46 tRNA genes (including 24 intron-containing tRNA genes). The repetitive sequences identified were SR-type repetitive sequences, long dispersed-type repetitive sequences and Tn-like repetitive elements. The genome contained 2826 potential protein-coding regions (open reading frames, ORFs). By similarity search against public databases, 911 (32.2%) ORFs were related to functional assigned genes, 921 (32.6%) were related to conserved ORFs of unknown function, 145 (5.1%) contained some motifs, and remaining 849 (30.0%) did not show any significant similarity to the registered sequences. The ORFs with functional assignments included the candidate genes involved in sulfide metabolism, the TCA cycle and the respiratory chain. Sequence comparison provided evidence suggesting the integration of plasmid, rearrangement of genomic structure, and duplication of genomic regions that may be responsible for the larger genomic size of the S. tokodaii strain7 genome. The genome contained eukaryote-type genes which were not identified in other archaea and lacked the CCA sequence in the tRNA genes. The result suggests that this strain is closer to eukaryotes among the archaea strains so far sequenced. The data presented in this paper are also available on the internet homepage (http:\/\/www.bio.nite.go.jp\/E-home\/genome_list-e.html\/).
ESTHER : Kawarabayasi_2001_DNA.Res_8_123
PubMedSearch : Kawarabayasi_2001_DNA.Res_8_123
PubMedID: 11572479
Gene_locus related to this paper: sulto-ST0002 , sulto-ST0071 , sulto-ST0672 , sulto-ST0779 , sulto-ST1414 , sulto-ST1737 , sulto-ST1745 , sulto-ST2026 , sulto-ST2099 , sulto-ST2511

Title : Complete genome sequence of an aerobic hyper-thermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1 - Kawarabayasi_1999_DNA.Res_6_83
Author(s) : Kawarabayasi Y , Hino Y , Horikawa H , Yamazaki S , Haikawa Y , Jin-no K , Takahashi M , Sekine M , Baba S , Ankai A , Kosugi H , Hosoyama A , Fukui S , Nagai Y , Nishijima K , Nakazawa H , Takamiya M , Masuda S , Funahashi T , Tanaka T , Kudoh Y , Yamazaki J , Kushida N , Oguchi A , Aoki KI , Kubota K , Nakamura Y , Nomura N , Sako Y , Kikuchi H
Ref : DNA Research , 6 :83 , 1999
Abstract : The complete sequence of the genome of an aerobic hyper-thermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, which optimally grows at 95 degrees C, has been determined by the whole genome shotgun method with some modifications. The entire length of the genome was 1,669,695 bp. The authenticity of the entire sequence was supported by restriction analysis of long PCR products, which were directly amplified from the genomic DNA. As the potential protein-coding regions, a total of 2,694 open reading frames (ORFs) were assigned. By similarity search against public databases, 633 (23.5%) of the ORFs were related to genes with putative function and 523 (19.4%) to the sequences registered but with unknown function. All the genes in the TCA cycle except for that of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were included, and instead of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase gene, the genes coding for the two subunits of 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were identified. The remaining 1,538 ORFs (57.1%) did not show any significant similarity to the sequences in the databases. Sequence comparison among the assigned ORFs suggested that a considerable member of ORFs were generated by sequence duplication. The RNA genes identified were a single 16S-23S rRNA operon, two 5S rRNA genes and 47 tRNA genes including 14 genes with intron structures. All the assigned ORFs and RNA coding regions occupied 89.12% of the whole genome. The data presented in this paper are available on the internet homepage (http:\/\/www.mild.nite.go.jp).
ESTHER : Kawarabayasi_1999_DNA.Res_6_83
PubMedSearch : Kawarabayasi_1999_DNA.Res_6_83
PubMedID: 10382966
Gene_locus related to this paper: aerpe-APE1244 , aerpe-APE1547 , aerpe-APE1832 , aerpe-APE2290 , aerpe-APE2361 , aerpe-APE2441

Title : Complete sequence and gene organization of the genome of a hyper-thermophilic archaebacterium, Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 - Kawarabayasi_1998_DNA.Res_5_55
Author(s) : Kawarabayasi Y , Sawada M , Horikawa H , Haikawa Y , Hino Y , Yamamoto S , Sekine M , Baba S , Kosugi H , Hosoyama A , Nagai Y , Sakai M , Ogura K , Otsuka R , Nakazawa H , Takamiya M , Ohfuku Y , Funahashi T , Tanaka T , Kudoh Y , Yamazaki J , Kushida N , Oguchi A , Aoki K , Kikuchi H
Ref : DNA Research , 5 :55 , 1998
Abstract : The complete sequence of the genome of a hyper-thermophilic archaebacterium, Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, has been determined by assembling the sequences of the physical map-based contigs of fosmid clones and of long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products which were used for gap-filling. The entire length of the genome was 1,738,505 bp. The authenticity of the entire genome sequence was supported by restriction analysis of long PCR products, which were directly amplified from the genomic DNA. As the potential protein-coding regions, a total of 2061 open reading frames (ORFs) were assigned, and by similarity search against public databases, 406 (19.7%) were related to genes with putative function and 453 (22.0%) to the sequences registered but with unknown function. The remaining 1202 ORFs (58.3%) did not show any significant similarity to the sequences in the databases. Sequence comparison among the assigned ORFs in the genome provided evidence that a considerable number of ORFs were generated by sequence duplication. By similarity search, 11 ORFs were assumed to contain the intein elements. The RNA genes identified were a single 16S-23S rRNA operon, two 5S rRNA genes and 46 tRNA genes including two with the intron structure. All the assigned ORFs and RNA coding regions occupied 91.25% of the whole genome. The data presented in this paper are available on the internet at http:@www.nite.go.jp.
ESTHER : Kawarabayasi_1998_DNA.Res_5_55
PubMedSearch : Kawarabayasi_1998_DNA.Res_5_55
PubMedID: 9679194
Gene_locus related to this paper: pyrho-PH0594 , pyrho-PH0863 , pyrho-PH1262

Title : Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the mono- and diacylglycerol lipase gene (mdlB) of Aspergillus oryzae - Tsuchiya_1996_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_143_63
Author(s) : Tsuchiya A , Nakazawa H , Toida J , Ohnishi K , Sekiguchi J
Ref : FEMS Microbiology Letters , 143 :63 , 1996
Abstract : Aspergillus oryzae IFO4202 produces at least two extracellular lipolytic enzymes L1 and L2 (cutinase, and mono- and diacylglycerol lipase, respectively). Southern hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA fragments with 23-mer oligonucleotides synthesized according to the amino acid sequence of the L2 as probe suggested the presence of the L2 gene (tentatively designated as mdlB) and an additional weakly hybridizing region. A fragment containing the genomic mdlB gene was cloned in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of the fragment revealed an open reading frame, comprising 1021 nucleotides, which contains two introns (51 and 52 nucleotides). Putative polyadenylation signals were found 182 and 287 bp downstream of the stop codon. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mdlB gene corresponds to 306 amino acid residues including a leader sequence of 28 amino acids and is highly similar to that of the mdlA gene of Penicillium camembertii. Three residues presumed to form the catalytic triad (serine, aspartic acid and histidine) of lipases were also conserved.
ESTHER : Tsuchiya_1996_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_143_63
PubMedSearch : Tsuchiya_1996_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_143_63
PubMedID: 8807803
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspor-MDLB

Title : Genome structure and nucleotide sequence of a lipolytic enzyme gene of Aspergillus oryzae - Ohnishi_1995_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_126_145
Author(s) : Ohnishi K , Toida J , Nakazawa H , Sekiguchi J
Ref : FEMS Microbiology Letters , 126 :145 , 1995
Abstract : Aspergillus oryzae, which is widely used for Japanese traditional fermentation, produced at least two lipolytic enzymes (L1 and L2). Southern hybridization analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA fragments of Aspergillus oryzae with 23-mer oligonucleotides synthesized according to the amino acid sequence of the enzyme L1 as probes suggested that there is single copy of the L1 gene in the genome. DNA fragments containing the L1 gene were cloned in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA fragments revealed an open reading frame consisting of 213 amino acid residues. It had three putative introns whose sizes were 52 bp, 48 bp and 53 bp, respectively. Putative CAAT and TATA boxes were found at positions -147 and -100 from A (+1) of the translational initiation codon, and a polyadenylation site at 158 bp downstream of the stop codon. The deduced amino acid sequence of the L1 gene was highly similar to those of cutinases from phytopathogenic fungi. Thus, it is interesting to note that the non-phytopathogenic fungus, A. oryzae, produces cutinase, which seems to play an important role in flavor formation.
ESTHER : Ohnishi_1995_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_126_145
PubMedSearch : Ohnishi_1995_FEMS.Microbiol.Lett_126_145
PubMedID: 7705606
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspor-cutas

Title : Viral respiratory infection causes airway hyperresponsiveness and decreases histamine N-methyltransferase activity in guinea pigs - Nakazawa_1994_Am.J.RespCrit.Care.Med_149_1180
Author(s) : Nakazawa H , Sekizawa K , Morikawa M , Yamauchi K , Satoh M , Maeyama K , Watanabe T , Sasaki H
Ref : American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine , 149 :1180 , 1994
Abstract : We investigated the effects of viral respiratory infection by Sendai virus on bronchial responses to aerosolized histamine in anesthetized guinea pigs and on the activity of histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT). We measured the change in total pulmonary resistance induced by histamine in the presence or absence of a specific HMT inhibitor, SKF 91488, in noninfected and infected animals. In the absence of SKF 91488, the bronchoconstrictor response to histamine was greater in infected than in noninfected animals. SKF 91488 (10(-2) M, 90 breaths) potentiated the responses to histamine in noninfected animals, and the magnitude of augmented responses to histamine by SKF 91488 was similar to that by viral infection. Furthermore, SKF 91488 did not further potentiate the responses to histamine in infected animals. However, responses to aerosolized acetylcholine were unaffected by viral infection and SKF 91488. The HMT activity decreased by 56% in the trachea, 86% in the bronchi, and 52% in the parenchymal tissue in the infected animals. In contrast to HMT activity, acetylcholinesterase activity was unaffected by viral infection. These results suggest that respiratory infection by Sendai virus causes enhanced bronchial responsiveness to histamine by decreasing HMT activity in airways.
ESTHER : Nakazawa_1994_Am.J.RespCrit.Care.Med_149_1180
PubMedSearch : Nakazawa_1994_Am.J.RespCrit.Care.Med_149_1180
PubMedID: 8173757

Title : Chemical oxidant potentiates electrically and acetylcholine-induced contraction in rat trachea: possible involvement of cholinesterase inhibition - Ohrui_1991_J.Pharmacol.Exp.Ther_259_371
Author(s) : Ohrui T , Sekizawa K , Yamauchi K , Ohkawara Y , Nakazawa H , Aikawa T , Sasaki H , Takishima T
Ref : Journal of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics , 259 :371 , 1991
Abstract : To determine the roles of oxidants in airway responsiveness, we studied the effects of the chemical oxidant N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS) on the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh) in isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle segments. Effects of NCS on the contractile response to EFS (5 Hz, 20 sec of duration, 50 V) reached the maximum with a 60-min incubation time. NCS potentiated the contractile response to EFS, with a maximum effect at 3 x 10(-7) M and to ACh, with a maximum effect at 3 x 10(-6) M. Thus, at a concentration of 3 x 10(-6) M, NCS significantly decreased log ED50 concentration of ACh from a control value of -5.56 +/- 0.05 to -6.24 +/- 0.06. Physostigmine (10(-7) M), at a concentration that did not alter resting tension, mimicked NCS-induced effects on contractile responses to ACh and EFS with the greater degree of shift in the respective dose-response curves. However, NCS failed to alter dose-response curves to carbachol. Removal of the epithelium shifted the dose-response curves to ACh to lower concentrations, but NCS showed similar effects on dose-response curves to ACh with and without the epithelium. Active staining showed that both acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7) and butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) activities were found in the smooth muscle of the rat trachea. NCS inhibited both enzyme activities from rat tracheal homogenates in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that NCS potentiates cholinergically induced contraction by decreasing cholinesterase activity and that the oxidation of cholinesterase may cause hyperresponsiveness of airway smooth muscle by inhibition of the enzyme activity.
ESTHER : Ohrui_1991_J.Pharmacol.Exp.Ther_259_371
PubMedSearch : Ohrui_1991_J.Pharmacol.Exp.Ther_259_371
PubMedID: 1920123