Taylor A

References (8)

Title : Challenges and opportunities for improving the landscape for Lewy body dementia clinical trials - Goldman_2020_Alzheimers.Res.Ther_12_137
Author(s) : Goldman JG , Forsberg LK , Boeve BF , Armstrong MJ , Irwin DJ , Ferman TJ , Galasko D , Galvin JE , Kaufer D , Leverenz J , Lippa CF , Marder K , Abler V , Biglan K , Irizarry M , Keller B , Munsie L , Nakagawa M , Taylor A , Graham T
Ref : Alzheimers Res Ther , 12 :137 , 2020
Abstract : Lewy body dementia (LBD), including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia, affects over a million people in the USA and has a substantial impact on patients, caregivers, and society. Symptomatic treatments for LBD, which can include cognitive, neuropsychiatric, autonomic, sleep, and motor features, are limited with only two drugs (cholinesterase inhibitors) currently approved by regulatory agencies for dementia in LBD. Clinical trials represent a top research priority, but there are many challenges in the development and implementation of trials in LBD. To address these issues and advance the field of clinical trials in the LBDs, the Lewy Body Dementia Association formed an Industry Advisory Council (LBDA IAC), in addition to its Research Center of Excellence program. The LBDA IAC comprises a diverse and collaborative group of experts from academic medical centers, pharmaceutical industries, and the patient advocacy foundation. The inaugural LBDA IAC meeting, held in June 2019, aimed to bring together this group, along with representatives from regulatory agencies, to address the topic of optimizing the landscape of LBD clinical trials. This review highlights the formation of the LBDA IAC, current state of LBD clinical trials, and challenges and opportunities in the field regarding trial design, study populations, diagnostic criteria, and biomarker utilization. Current gaps include a lack of standardized clinical assessment tools and evidence-based management strategies for LBD as well as difficulty and controversy in diagnosing LBD. Challenges in LBD clinical trials include the heterogeneity of LBD pathology and symptomatology, limited understanding of the trajectory of LBD cognitive and core features, absence of LBD-specific outcome measures, and lack of established standardized biologic, imaging, or genetic biomarkers that may inform study design. Demands of study participation (e.g., travel, duration, and frequency of study visits) may also pose challenges and impact trial enrollment, retention, and outcomes. There are opportunities to improve the landscape of LBD clinical trials by harmonizing clinical assessments and biomarkers across cohorts and research studies, developing and validating outcome measures in LBD, engaging the patient community to assess research needs and priorities, and incorporating biomarker and genotype profiling in study design.
ESTHER : Goldman_2020_Alzheimers.Res.Ther_12_137
PubMedSearch : Goldman_2020_Alzheimers.Res.Ther_12_137
PubMedID: 33121510

Title : Characterisation of pathogen-specific regions and novel effector candidates in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae - Armitage_2018_Sci.Rep_8_13530
Author(s) : Armitage AD , Taylor A , Sobczyk MK , Baxter L , Greenfield BPJ , Bates HJ , Wilson F , Jackson AC , Ott S , Harrison RJ , Clarkson JP
Ref : Sci Rep , 8 :13530 , 2018
Abstract : A reference-quality assembly of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (Foc), the causative agent of onion basal rot has been generated along with genomes of additional pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of onion. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed a single origin of the Foc pathogenic lineage. Genome alignments with other F. oxysporum ff. spp. and non pathogens revealed high levels of syntenic conservation of core chromosomes but little synteny between lineage specific (LS) chromosomes. Four LS contigs in Foc totaling 3.9 Mb were designated as pathogen-specific (PS). A two-fold increase in segmental duplication events was observed between LS regions of the genome compared to within core regions or from LS regions to the core. RNA-seq expression studies identified candidate effectors expressed in planta, consisting of both known effector homologs and novel candidates. FTF1 and a subset of other transcription factors implicated in regulation of effector expression were found to be expressed in planta.
ESTHER : Armitage_2018_Sci.Rep_8_13530
PubMedSearch : Armitage_2018_Sci.Rep_8_13530
PubMedID: 30202022
Gene_locus related to this paper: fusox-w9hvf0 , gibin-a0a420svd8 , gibm7-w7n4n0

Title : The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10 - Deloukas_2004_Nature_429_375
Author(s) : Deloukas P , Earthrowl ME , Grafham DV , Rubenfield M , French L , Steward CA , Sims SK , Jones MC , Searle S , Scott C , Howe K , Hunt SE , Andrews TD , Gilbert JG , Swarbreck D , Ashurst JL , Taylor A , Battles J , Bird CP , Ainscough R , Almeida JP , Ashwell RI , Ambrose KD , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Bailey J , Banerjee R , Bates K , Beasley H , Bray-Allen S , Brown AJ , Brown JY , Burford DC , Burrill W , Burton J , Cahill P , Camire D , Carter NP , Chapman JC , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Corby N , Coulson A , Dhami P , Dutta I , Dunn M , Faulkner L , Frankish A , Frankland JA , Garner P , Garnett J , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gustafson E , Hammond S , Harley JL , Hart E , Heath PD , Ho TP , Hopkins B , Horne J , Howden PJ , Huckle E , Hynds C , Johnson C , Johnson D , Kana A , Kay M , Kimberley AM , Kershaw JK , Kokkinaki M , Laird GK , Lawlor S , Lee HM , Leongamornlert DA , Laird G , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loveland J , Lovell J , Mclaren S , McLay KE , McMurray A , Mashreghi-Mohammadi M , Matthews L , Milne S , Nickerson T , Nguyen M , Overton-Larty E , Palmer SA , Pearce AV , Peck AI , Pelan S , Phillimore B , Porter K , Rice CM , Rogosin A , Ross MT , Sarafidou T , Sehra HK , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith M , Standring L , Sycamore N , Tester J , Thorpe A , Torcasso W , Tracey A , Tromans A , Tsolas J , Wall M , Walsh J , Wang H , Weinstock K , West AP , Willey DL , Whitehead SL , Wilming L , Wray PW , Young L , Chen Y , Lovering RC , Moschonas NK , Siebert R , Fechtel K , Bentley D , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Doucette-Stamm L , Beck S , Smith DR , Rogers J
Ref : Nature , 429 :375 , 2004
Abstract : The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence.
ESTHER : Deloukas_2004_Nature_429_375
PubMedSearch : Deloukas_2004_Nature_429_375
PubMedID: 15164054
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LIPA , human-LIPK , human-PNLIPRP1 , human-PNLIPRP2 , human-PNLIPRP3

Title : A structure-based design approach to the development of novel, reversible AChE inhibitors - Doucet-Personeni_2001_J.Med.Chem_44_3203
Author(s) : Doucet-Personeni C , Bentley PD , Fletcher RJ , Kinkaid A , Kryger G , Pirard B , Taylor A , Taylor R , Taylor J , Viner R , Silman I , Sussman JL , Greenblatt HM , Lewis T
Ref : Journal of Medicinal Chemistry , 44 :3203 , 2001
Abstract : Chimeras of tacrine and m-(N,N,N-Trimethylammonio)trifluoroacetophenone (1) were designed as novel, reversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. On the basis of the X-ray structure of the apoenzyme, a molecular modeling study determined the favored attachment positions on the 4-aminoquinoline ring (position 3 and the 4-amino nitrogen) and the favored lengths of a polymethylene link between the two moieties (respectively 5-6 and 4-5 sp(3) atoms). Seven compounds matching these criteria were synthesized, and their inhibitory potencies were determined to be in the low nanomolar range. Activity data for close analogues lacking some of the postulated key features showed that our predictions were correct. In addition, a subsequent crystal structure of acetylcholinesterase complexed with the most active compound 27 was in good agreement with our model. The design strategy is therefore validated and can now be developed further.
ESTHER : Doucet-Personeni_2001_J.Med.Chem_44_3203
PubMedSearch : Doucet-Personeni_2001_J.Med.Chem_44_3203
PubMedID: 11563919
Gene_locus related to this paper: torca-ACHE

Title : Structure determination and refinement of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase and its complex with bestatin - Burley_1992_J.Mol.Biol_224_113
Author(s) : Burley SK , David PR , Sweet RM , Taylor A , Lipscomb WN
Ref : Journal of Molecular Biology , 224 :113 , 1992
Abstract : The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0 A resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, this structure and the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme have been refined at 2.25 and 2.32 A resolution, respectively, with crystallographic R-factors of 0.180 and 0.159, respectively. The current structural model for the enzyme includes the two zinc ions and 481 of the 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry, and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 A and maximal thickness of 90 A. Monomers are crystallographically equivalent. Each is folded into two unequal alpha/beta domains connected by an alpha-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 A x 55 A x 55 A. The secondary structural composition is 35% alpha-helix and 23% beta-strand. The N-terminal domain (160 amino acid residues) mediates trimer-trimer interactions and does not appear to participate directly in catalysis, while the C-terminal domain (327 amino acid residues) is responsible for catalysis and binds the two zinc ions, which are less than 3 A apart. These two metal ions are located near the edge of an eight-stranded, saddle-shaped beta-sheet. The zinc ion that has the lower temperature factor is co-ordinated by one carboxylate oxygen atom from each of Asp255, Asp332 and Glu334, and the carbonyl oxygen of Asp332. The other zinc ion, presumed to be readily exchangeable, is co-ordinated by one carboxylate oxygen atom of each of Asp273 and Glu334 and the side-chain amino group of Lys250. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys262 and Arg336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 A and thickness 10 A. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the 2-fold symmetry axes. Bestatin binds to one of the active site zinc ions, and its phenylalanine and leucine side-chains occupy hydrophobic pockets adjacent to the active site. Finally, the relationship between bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase and the homologous enzyme pepA from Escherichia coli is discussed.
ESTHER : Burley_1992_J.Mol.Biol_224_113
PubMedSearch : Burley_1992_J.Mol.Biol_224_113
PubMedID: 1548695

Title : Molecular structure of leucine aminopeptidase at 2.7-A resolution - Burley_1990_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_87_6878
Author(s) : Burley SK , David PR , Taylor A , Lipscomb WN
Ref : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 87 :6878 , 1990
Abstract : The three-dimensional structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) complexed with bestatin, a slow-binding inhibitor, has been solved to 3.0-A resolution by the multiple isomorphous replacement method with phase combination and density modification. In addition, the structure of the isomorphous native enzyme has been refined at 2.7-A resolution, and the current crystallographic R factor is 0.169 for a model that includes the two zinc ions and all 487 amino acid residues comprising the asymmetric unit. The enzyme is physiologically active as a hexamer, which has 32 symmetry and is triangular in shape with a triangle edge length of 115 A and maximal thickness of 90 A. The monomers are crystallographically equivalent and each is folded into two unequal alpha/beta domains connected by an alpha-helix to give a comma-like shape with approximate maximal dimensions of 90 x 55 x 55 A3. The secondary structural composition is 40% alpha-helix and 19% beta-strand. The N-terminal domain (160 amino acids) mediates trimer-trimer interactions and does not appear to participate directly in catalysis. The C-terminal domain (327 amino acids) is responsible for catalysis and binds the two zinc ions, which are 2.88 A apart. The pair of metal ions is located near the edge of an eight-stranded, saddle-shaped beta-sheet. One zinc ion is coordinated by carboxylate oxygen atoms of Asp-255, Asp-332, and Glu-334 and the carbonyl oxygen of Asp-332. The other zinc ion is coordinated by the carboxylate oxygen atoms of Asp-255, Asp-273, and Glu-334. The active site also contains two positively charged residues, Lys-250 and Arg-336. The six active sites are themselves located in the interior of the hexamer, where they line a disk-shaped cavity of radius 15 A and thickness 10 A. Access to this cavity is provided by solvent channels that run along the twofold symmetry axes.
ESTHER : Burley_1990_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_87_6878
PubMedSearch : Burley_1990_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_87_6878
PubMedID: 2395881

Title : The antibacterial activity of some naturally occurring 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinones - Brewer_1984_Can.J.Microbiol_30_1068
Author(s) : Brewer D , Jen WC , Jones GA , Taylor A
Ref : Can J Microbiol , 30 :1068 , 1984
Abstract : Polyporic acid, atromentin, bovinone, and oosporein are common metabolic products of a number of species of fungi. The related compound cochliodinol and its congeners are produced by several Chaetomium spp. These quinonoid metabolites have been shown to inhibit the growth and metabolism of a range of bacterial genera. The antibiotic activity of the quinones depends on the substituents at the 3 and 6 positions of the 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone ring; in aerobic systems the activity appears to be inversely proportional to the polarity of the metabolite. It has been shown that reduction of the quinone to the hydroquinone changes the antibiotic activity of these metabolites but does not abolish it. Contrary to previous reports, the activity of these hydroquinones is not reversed by cysteine.
ESTHER : Brewer_1984_Can.J.Microbiol_30_1068
PubMedSearch : Brewer_1984_Can.J.Microbiol_30_1068
PubMedID: 6541963
Gene_locus related to this paper: tappa-atra

Title : Hazards to wildlife from the use of DDT in orchards - Bailey_1970_Pest.Sci_1_66
Author(s) : Bailey S , Bunyan PJ , Jennings DM , Taylor A
Ref : Pest Sci , 1 :66 , 1970
Abstract : An investigation into the poisoning of birds with 1,1,1-trichloro-2, 2-di (4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) on a fruit farm in South-East England is described. Pesticide levels in wild birds were sufficient to be held responsible for deaths. It is suggested that levels in samples of soil, earthworms, sludge, eggs, etc. did not indicate the source of the poisoning. Examination of caged birds following exposure to normal spraying indicated little hazard from this type of operation. Some discussion of the assessment of levels of intoxication is included.
ESTHER : Bailey_1970_Pest.Sci_1_66
PubMedSearch : Bailey_1970_Pest.Sci_1_66
PubMedID: