Folsom AR

References (3)

Title : A genome-wide association study identifies LIPA as a susceptibility gene for coronary artery disease - Wild_2011_Circ.Cardiovasc.Genet_4_403
Author(s) : Wild PS , Zeller T , Schillert A , Szymczak S , Sinning CR , Deiseroth A , Schnabel RB , Lubos E , Keller T , Eleftheriadis MS , Bickel C , Rupprecht HJ , Wilde S , Rossmann H , Diemert P , Cupples LA , Perret C , Erdmann J , Stark K , Kleber ME , Epstein SE , Voight BF , Kuulasmaa K , Li M , Schafer AS , Klopp N , Braund PS , Sager HB , Demissie S , Proust C , Konig IR , Wichmann HE , Reinhard W , Hoffmann MM , Virtamo J , Burnett MS , Siscovick D , Wiklund PG , Qu L , El Mokthari NE , Thompson JR , Peters A , Smith AV , Yon E , Baumert J , Hengstenberg C , Marz W , Amouyel P , Devaney J , Schwartz SM , Saarela O , Mehta NN , Rubin D , Silander K , Hall AS , Ferrieres J , Harris TB , Melander O , Kee F , Hakonarson H , Schrezenmeir J , Gudnason V , Elosua R , Arveiler D , Evans A , Rader DJ , Illig T , Schreiber S , Bis JC , Altshuler D , Kavousi M , Witteman JC , Uitterlinden AG , Hofman A , Folsom AR , Barbalic M , Boerwinkle E , Kathiresan S , Reilly MP , O'Donnell CJ , Samani NJ , Schunkert H , Cambien F , Lackner KJ , Tiret L , Salomaa V , Munzel T , Ziegler A , Blankenberg S
Ref : Circ Cardiovasc Genet , 4 :403 , 2011
Abstract : BACKGROUND: eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: In a genome-wide association analysis of 2078 CAD cases and 2953 control subjects, we identified 950 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were associated with CAD at P<10(-3). Subsequent in silico and wet-laboratory replication stages and a final meta-analysis of 21 428 CAD cases and 38 361 control subjects revealed a novel association signal at chromosome 10q23.31 within the LIPA (lysosomal acid lipase A) gene (P=3.7x10(-8); odds ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.14). The association of this locus with global gene expression was assessed by genome-wide expression analyses in the monocyte transcriptome of 1494 individuals. The results showed a strong association of this locus with expression of the LIPA transcript (P=1.3x10(-96)). An assessment of LIPA SNPs and transcript with cardiovascular phenotypes revealed an association of LIPA transcript levels with impaired endothelial function (P=4.4x10(-3)). CONCLUSIONS: The use of data on genetic variants and the addition of data on global monocytic gene expression led to the identification of the novel functional CAD susceptibility locus LIPA, located on chromosome 10q23.31. The respective eSNPs associated with CAD strongly affect LIPA gene expression level, which was related to endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of CAD.
ESTHER : Wild_2011_Circ.Cardiovasc.Genet_4_403
PubMedSearch : Wild_2011_Circ.Cardiovasc.Genet_4_403
PubMedID: 21606135
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LIPA

Title : Associations between HDL-cholesterol and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase genes are modified by dietary fat intake in African American and White adults - Nettleton_2007_Atherosclerosis_194_e131
Author(s) : Nettleton JA , Steffen LM , Ballantyne CM , Boerwinkle E , Folsom AR
Ref : Atherosclerosis , 194 :e131 , 2007
Abstract : Polymorphisms in genes involved in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism influence plasma HDL-C concentrations. We examined whether dietary fat intake modified relations between HDL-C and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase (LIPC-514C-->T), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL S447X) genes. Diet (food frequency questionnaire), plasma lipids, and LIPC, CETP, and LPL genotypes were assessed in approximately 12,000 White and African American adults. In both races and all genotypes studied, minor allele homozygotes had highest HDL-C concentrations compared to the other genotypes (P<0.001). However, main effects were modified by usual dietary fat intake. In African Americans - women somewhat more strongly than men -LIPC TT homozygotes with fat intake >or=33.2% of energy had approximately 3-4 mg/dL higher HDL-C concentrations than CC and CT genotypes. In contrast, when fat intake was <33.2% of energy, TT homozygotes had HDL-C concentrations approximately 3.5mg/dL greater than those with the CC genotype but not different from those with the CT genotype (P(interaction)=0.013). In Whites, LPLGG homozygotes had greatest HDL-C at lower total, saturated, and monounsaturated fat intakes but lowest HDL-C at higher intakes of these fats (P(interaction)
ESTHER : Nettleton_2007_Atherosclerosis_194_e131
PubMedSearch : Nettleton_2007_Atherosclerosis_194_e131
PubMedID: 17157861

Title : Hypercholesterolemia prevalence, awareness, and treatment in blacks and whites: the Minnesota Heart Survey - Sprafka_1989_Prev.Med_18_423
Author(s) : Sprafka JM , Burke GL , Folsom AR , Hahn LP
Ref : Prev Med , 18 :423 , 1989
Abstract : Two cross-sectional population-based surveys were conducted in 1985 and 1986 to describe cardiovascular risk factors in blacks and whites in the Twin Cities. A total of 1,254 blacks and 2,934 whites ages 35-74 years participated. The surveys consisted of a home interview followed by survey center visit during which nonfasting serum total cholesterol level was measured and medication use during the past year was reviewed. Age-adjusted mean values for serum total cholesterol were significantly higher among white than black participants for both men (207 vs 193 mg/dl, P less than 0.001) and women (206 vs 202 mg/dl, P less than 0.05). Blacks had significantly higher serum HDL cholesterol levels than whites (men, 49 vs 41 mg/dl, P less than 0.001; women, 56 vs 54 mg/dl, P less than 0.01). The age-adjusted prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (serum total cholesterol greater than or equal to 240 mg/dl on the day of survey and/or current use of cholesterol lowering medication) was significantly higher among white than black men (18.3% vs 12.2%, P less than 0.01). No significant race differences were noted for women (whites, 19.7% vs blacks, 16.6%). Among hypercholesterolemic men, 66% of whites current use of cholesterol lowering medication) was significantly higher among white than black men (18.3% vs 12.2%, P less than 0.01). No significant race differences were noted for women (whites, 19.7% vs blacks, 16.6%). Among hypercholesterolemic men, 66% of whites current use of cholesterol lowering medication) was significantly higher among white than black men (18.3% vs 12.2%, P less than 0.01). No significant race differences were noted for women (whites, 19.7% vs blacks, 16.6%). Among hypercholesterolemic men, 66% of whites and 80% of blacks were unaware of their condition; among women, 72% of whites and 79% of blacks were unaware. Among individuals told by a physician they had "high blood fats," 2.9% of whites and no blacks were using medication for elevated blood cholesterol levels, while 70% of whites and 63% of blacks reported being advised to follow a low-fat-low-cholesterol diet. These data emphasize the need for education programs for physicians and patients regarding detection and control of hypercholesterolemia.
ESTHER : Sprafka_1989_Prev.Med_18_423
PubMedSearch : Sprafka_1989_Prev.Med_18_423
PubMedID: 2798366