Nester EW

References (3)

Title : Genome sequences of three agrobacterium biovars help elucidate the evolution of multichromosome genomes in bacteria - Slater_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_2501
Author(s) : Slater SC , Goldman BS , Goodner B , Setubal JC , Farrand SK , Nester EW , Burr TJ , Banta L , Dickerman AW , Paulsen I , Otten L , Suen G , Welch R , Almeida NF , Arnold F , Burton OT , Du Z , Ewing A , Godsy E , Heisel S , Houmiel KL , Jhaveri J , Lu J , Miller NM , Norton S , Chen Q , Phoolcharoen W , Ohlin V , Ondrusek D , Pride N , Stricklin SL , Sun J , Wheeler C , Wilson L , Zhu H , Wood DW
Ref : J. Bacteriol , 191 :2501 , 2009
Abstract : The family Rhizobiaceae contains plant-associated bacteria with critical roles in ecology and agriculture. Within this family, many Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium strains are nitrogen-fixing plant mutualists, while many strains designated as Agrobacterium are plant pathogens. These contrasting lifestyles are primarily dependent on the transmissible plasmids each strain harbors. Members of the Rhizobiaceae also have diverse genome architectures that include single chromosomes, multiple chromosomes, and plasmids of various sizes. Agrobacterium strains have been divided into three biovars, based on physiological and biochemical properties. The genome of a biovar I strain, A. tumefaciens C58, has been previously sequenced. In this study, the genomes of the biovar II strain A. radiobacter K84, a commercially available biological control strain that inhibits certain pathogenic agrobacteria, and the biovar III strain A. vitis S4, a narrow-host-range strain that infects grapes and invokes a hypersensitive response on nonhost plants, were fully sequenced and annotated. Comparison with other sequenced members of the Alphaproteobacteria provides new data on the evolution of multipartite bacterial genomes. Primary chromosomes show extensive conservation of both gene content and order. In contrast, secondary chromosomes share smaller percentages of genes, and conserved gene order is restricted to short blocks. We propose that secondary chromosomes originated from an ancestral plasmid to which genes have been transferred from a progenitor primary chromosome. Similar patterns are observed in select Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria species. Together, these results define the evolution of chromosome architecture and gene content among the Rhizobiaceae and support a generalized mechanism for second-chromosome formation among bacteria.
ESTHER : Slater_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_2501
PubMedSearch : Slater_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_2501
PubMedID: 19251847
Gene_locus related to this paper: agrrk-b9j7k2 , agrrk-b9j8e4 , agrrk-b9j8g5 , agrrk-b9j9n4 , agrrk-b9j9p4 , agrrk-b9ja88 , agrrk-b9jbs5 , agrrk-b9jd67 , agrrk-b9jd85 , agrrk-b9jfh5 , agrrk-b9jfj6 , agrrk-b9jfu6 , agrrk-b9jfy6 , agrrk-b9jh78 , agrrk-b9ji04 , agrrk-b9jih5 , agrrk-b9jih7 , agrrk-b9jj14 , agrrk-b9jjt5 , agrrk-b9jjt6 , agrrk-b9jk42 , agrrk-b9jki6 , agrrk-b9jkt4 , agrrk-b9jla0 , agrrk-b9jlc3 , agrrk-b9jlj1 , agrrk-b9jlj2 , agrrk-b9jlr1 , agrrk-b9jmj9 , agrrk-b9jml0 , agrrk-b9jmn1 , agrrk-b9jnw6 , agrrk-b9jq01 , agrrk-b9jq11 , agrrk-b9jq35 , agrtu-DHAA , agrvs-b9jqv2 , agrvs-b9jr09 , agrvs-b9js24 , agrvs-b9js61 , agrvs-b9ju03 , agrvs-b9jw40 , agrvs-b9jx20 , agrvs-b9jy84 , agrvs-b9k1h8 , agrvs-b9k2m9 , agrvs-b9k3r6 , agrvs-b9k5p9 , agrvs-b9k093 , agrvs-b9k188 , agrvs-b9k312 , agrrk-b9jls9 , agrrk-b9jca1 , agrvs-b9jur1 , agrrk-rutd

Title : Agrobacterium type IV secretion is a two-step process in which export substrates associate with the virulence protein VirJ in the periplasm - Pantoja_2002_Mol.Microbiol_45_1325
Author(s) : Pantoja M , Chen L , Chen Y , Nester EW
Ref : Molecular Microbiology , 45 :1325 , 2002
Abstract : Type IV secretion systems are virulence determinants in many bacteria and share extensive homology with many conjugal transfer systems. Although type IV systems and their homologues have been studied widely, the mechanism by which substrates are secreted remains unclear. In Agrobacterium, we show that type IV secretion substrates that lack signal peptides form a soluble complex in the periplasm with the virulence protein VirJ. Additionally, these proteins co-precipitate with constituents of the type IV transporter: the VirB pilus and the VirD4 protein. Our findings suggest that the substrate proteins localized to the periplasm may associate with the pilus in a manner that is mediated by VirJ, and suggest a two-step process for type IV secretion in Agrobacterium. Our analyses of protein-protein interactions in a variety of mutant backgrounds indicate that substrates are probably secreted independently of one another.
ESTHER : Pantoja_2002_Mol.Microbiol_45_1325
PubMedSearch : Pantoja_2002_Mol.Microbiol_45_1325
PubMedID: 12207700

Title : The genome of the natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 - Wood_2001_Science_294_2317
Author(s) : Wood DW , Setubal JC , Kaul R , Monks DE , Kitajima JP , Okura VK , Zhou Y , Chen L , Wood GE , Almeida NF, Jr. , Woo L , Chen Y , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Karp PD , Bovee D, Sr. , Chapman P , Clendenning J , Deatherage G , Gillet W , Grant C , Kutyavin T , Levy R , Li MJ , McClelland E , Palmieri A , Raymond C , Rouse G , Saenphimmachak C , Wu Z , Romero P , Gordon D , Zhang S , Yoo H , Tao Y , Biddle P , Jung M , Krespan W , Perry M , Gordon-Kamm B , Liao L , Kim S , Hendrick C , Zhao ZY , Dolan M , Chumley F , Tingey SV , Tomb JF , Gordon MP , Olson MV , Nester EW
Ref : Science , 294 :2317 , 2001
Abstract : The 5.67-megabase genome of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 consists of a circular chromosome, a linear chromosome, and two plasmids. Extensive orthology and nucleotide colinearity between the genomes of A. tumefaciens and the plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest a recent evolutionary divergence. Their similarities include metabolic, transport, and regulatory systems that promote survival in the highly competitive rhizosphere; differences are apparent in their genome structure and virulence gene complement. Availability of the A. tumefaciens sequence will facilitate investigations into the molecular basis of pathogenesis and the evolutionary divergence of pathogenic and symbiotic lifestyles.
ESTHER : Wood_2001_Science_294_2317
PubMedSearch : Wood_2001_Science_294_2317
PubMedID: 11743193
Gene_locus related to this paper: agrt5-a9cf94 , agrt5-a9cfa9 , agrt5-a9cfs8 , agrt5-a9cfu7 , agrt5-a9cie7 , agrt5-a9cj11 , agrt5-a9cjp2 , agrt5-a9cki2 , agrt5-a9ckr2 , agrt5-a9ckt2 , agrt5-a9cle4 , agrt5-a9clq8 , agrt5-a9clq9 , agrt5-q7cx24 , agrt5-q7d1j0 , agrt5-q7d1j3 , agrt5-q7d3m5 , agrt5-y5261 , agrtu-ACVB , agrtu-ATTS , agrtu-ATU0253 , agrtu-ATU0403 , agrtu-ATU0841 , agrtu-ATU1045 , agrtu-ATU1102 , agrtu-ATU1572 , agrtu-ATU1617 , agrtu-ATU1826 , agrtu-ATU1842 , agrtu-ATU2061 , agrtu-ATU2126 , agrtu-ATU2171 , agrtu-ATU2409 , agrtu-ATU2452 , agrtu-ATU2481 , agrtu-ATU2497 , agrtu-ATU2576 , agrtu-ATU3428 , agrtu-ATU3651 , agrtu-ATU3652 , agrtu-ATU4238 , agrtu-ATU5190 , agrtu-ATU5193 , agrtu-ATU5275 , agrtu-ATU5296 , agrtu-ATU5348 , agrtu-ATU5389 , agrtu-ATU5446 , agrtu-ATU5495 , agrtu-CPO , agrtu-DHAA , agrtu-DLHH , agrtu-EPHA , agrtu-GRST , agrtu-PCA , agrtu-PCAD , agrtu-PHBC , agrtu-PTRB , agrt5-a9cji8