Joly DL

References (2)

Title : The transition from a phytopathogenic smut ancestor to an anamorphic biocontrol agent deciphered by comparative whole-genome analysis - Lefebvre_2013_Plant.Cell_25_1946
Author(s) : Lefebvre F , Joly DL , Labbe C , Teichmann B , Linning R , Belzile F , Bakkeren G , Belanger RR
Ref : Plant Cell , 25 :1946 , 2013
Abstract : Pseudozyma flocculosa is related to the model plant pathogen Ustilago maydis yet is not a phytopathogen but rather a biocontrol agent of powdery mildews; this relationship makes it unique for the study of the evolution of plant pathogenicity factors. The P. flocculosa genome of ~23 Mb includes 6877 predicted protein coding genes. Genome features, including hallmarks of pathogenicity, are very similar in P. flocculosa and U. maydis, Sporisorium reilianum, and Ustilago hordei. Furthermore, P. flocculosa, a strict anamorph, revealed conserved and seemingly intact mating-type and meiosis loci typical of Ustilaginales. By contrast, we observed the loss of a specific subset of candidate secreted effector proteins reported to influence virulence in U. maydis as the singular divergence that could explain its nonpathogenic nature. These results suggest that P. flocculosa could have once been a virulent smut fungus that lost the specific effectors necessary for host compatibility. Interestingly, the biocontrol agent appears to have acquired genes encoding secreted proteins not found in the compared Ustilaginales, including necrosis-inducing-Phytophthora-protein- and Lysin-motif- containing proteins believed to have direct relevance to its lifestyle. The genome sequence should contribute to new insights into the subtle genetic differences that can lead to drastic changes in fungal pathogen lifestyles.
ESTHER : Lefebvre_2013_Plant.Cell_25_1946
PubMedSearch : Lefebvre_2013_Plant.Cell_25_1946
PubMedID: 23800965
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9basi-a0a061h902 , 9basi-a0a061hbm8 , 9basi-a0a061had9

Title : Obligate biotrophy features unraveled by the genomic analysis of rust fungi - Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
Author(s) : Duplessis S , Cuomo CA , Lin YC , Aerts A , Tisserant E , Veneault-Fourrey C , Joly DL , Hacquard S , Amselem J , Cantarel BL , Chiu R , Coutinho PM , Feau N , Field M , Frey P , Gelhaye E , Goldberg J , Grabherr MG , Kodira CD , Kohler A , Kues U , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Mago R , Mauceli E , Morin E , Murat C , Pangilinan JL , Park R , Pearson M , Quesneville H , Rouhier N , Sakthikumar S , Salamov AA , Schmutz J , Selles B , Shapiro H , Tanguay P , Tuskan GA , Henrissat B , Van de Peer Y , Rouze P , Ellis JG , Dodds PN , Schein JE , Zhong S , Hamelin RC , Grigoriev IV , Szabo LJ , Martin F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 108 :9166 , 2011
Abstract : Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101-Mb genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89-Mb genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,399 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina with the 17,773 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic lifestyle include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins, impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino acid and oligopeptide membrane transporters. The dramatic up-regulation of transcripts coding for small secreted proteins, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells.
ESTHER : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedSearch : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedID: 21536894
Gene_locus related to this paper: pucgt-e3k840 , pucgt-e3kaq6 , pucgt-e3kw59 , pucgt-e3kz16 , pucgt-e3l9v6 , pucgt-e3l279 , pucgt-h6qt25 , mellp-f4reh4 , mellp-f4rhc8 , mellp-f4reh2 , mellp-f4r3y0 , mellp-f4rz15 , mellp-f4rz64 , mellp-f4rl14 , mellp-f4rz66 , mellp-f4s751 , mellp-f4s2g6 , pucgt-e3l1z7 , pucgt-e3l803 , pucgt-e3kst2 , pucgt-e3kst5 , mellp-f4ru03 , pucgt-e3l1z8 , pucgt-e3ktz7 , pucgt-e3jun4 , mellp-f4rl65 , mellp-f4rz16 , mellp-f4ru02 , mellp-f4sav4 , mellp-f4sav3 , mellp-f4s1j0 , mellp-f4rkp0 , mellp-f4s483 , pucgt-e3kzu5 , pucgt-h6qtq8 , mellp-f4r5l5 , pucgt-e3krw7 , pucgt-e3l7w5 , pucgt-e3k2w6 , pucgt-e3kfg2 , pucgt-kex1