Pearson M

References (4)

Title : The muscarinic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulator PQCA improves cognitive measures in rat, cynomolgus macaque, and rhesus macaque - Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
Author(s) : Uslaner JM , Eddins D , Puri V , Cannon CE , Sutcliffe J , Chew CS , Pearson M , Vivian JA , Chang RK , Ray WJ , Kuduk SD , Wittmann M
Ref : Psychopharmacology (Berl) , 225 :21 , 2013
Abstract : RATIONALE: The current standards of care for Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, have limited efficacy due to a host of mechanism-related side effects arising from indiscriminate activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. The M1 muscarinic receptor is predominantly expressed in the brain in regions involved in cognition, and therefore selective activation of the M1 receptor would be expected to boost cognitive performance with reduced risk of peripheral side effects. OBJECTIVES: Here we investigated whether the selective M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulator, PQCA, improves cognitive performance and cerebral blood flow.
RESULTS: PQCA attenuated a scopolamine-induced deficit in novel object recognition in rat, self-ordered spatial search in cynomolgus macaque, and the object retrieval detour task in rhesus macaque. Beneficial effects in each of these assays and species were observed at similar plasma drug concentrations. Furthermore, at similar drug concentrations that were effective in the behavioral studies, PQCA increased blood flow in the frontal cortex of mice, providing a translational biomarker that could be used to guide dose selection for clinical studies.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide a framework for appropriately testing an M1 selective compound in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
ESTHER : Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
PubMedSearch : Uslaner_2013_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_225_21
PubMedID: 22825578

Title : Obligate biotrophy features unraveled by the genomic analysis of rust fungi - Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
Author(s) : Duplessis S , Cuomo CA , Lin YC , Aerts A , Tisserant E , Veneault-Fourrey C , Joly DL , Hacquard S , Amselem J , Cantarel BL , Chiu R , Coutinho PM , Feau N , Field M , Frey P , Gelhaye E , Goldberg J , Grabherr MG , Kodira CD , Kohler A , Kues U , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Mago R , Mauceli E , Morin E , Murat C , Pangilinan JL , Park R , Pearson M , Quesneville H , Rouhier N , Sakthikumar S , Salamov AA , Schmutz J , Selles B , Shapiro H , Tanguay P , Tuskan GA , Henrissat B , Van de Peer Y , Rouze P , Ellis JG , Dodds PN , Schein JE , Zhong S , Hamelin RC , Grigoriev IV , Szabo LJ , Martin F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 108 :9166 , 2011
Abstract : Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101-Mb genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89-Mb genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,399 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina with the 17,773 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic lifestyle include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins, impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino acid and oligopeptide membrane transporters. The dramatic up-regulation of transcripts coding for small secreted proteins, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells.
ESTHER : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedSearch : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedID: 21536894
Gene_locus related to this paper: pucgt-e3k840 , pucgt-e3kaq6 , pucgt-e3kw59 , pucgt-e3kz16 , pucgt-e3l9v6 , pucgt-e3l279 , pucgt-h6qt25 , mellp-f4reh4 , mellp-f4rhc8 , mellp-f4reh2 , mellp-f4r3y0 , mellp-f4rz15 , mellp-f4rz64 , mellp-f4rl14 , mellp-f4rz66 , mellp-f4s751 , mellp-f4s2g6 , pucgt-e3l1z7 , pucgt-e3l803 , pucgt-e3kst2 , pucgt-e3kst5 , mellp-f4ru03 , pucgt-e3l1z8 , pucgt-e3ktz7 , pucgt-e3jun4 , mellp-f4rl65 , mellp-f4rz16 , mellp-f4ru02 , mellp-f4sav4 , mellp-f4sav3 , mellp-f4s1j0 , mellp-f4rkp0 , mellp-f4s483 , pucgt-e3kzu5 , pucgt-h6qtq8 , mellp-f4r5l5 , pucgt-e3krw7 , pucgt-e3l7w5 , pucgt-e3k2w6 , pucgt-e3kfg2 , pucgt-kex1

Title : Genomic analysis of the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea - Amselem_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002230
Author(s) : Amselem J , Cuomo CA , van Kan JA , Viaud M , Benito EP , Couloux A , Coutinho PM , de Vries RP , Dyer PS , Fillinger S , Fournier E , Gout L , Hahn M , Kohn L , Lapalu N , Plummer KM , Pradier JM , Quevillon E , Sharon A , Simon A , ten Have A , Tudzynski B , Tudzynski P , Wincker P , Andrew M , Anthouard V , Beever RE , Beffa R , Benoit I , Bouzid O , Brault B , Chen Z , Choquer M , Collemare J , Cotton P , Danchin EG , Da Silva C , Gautier A , Giraud C , Giraud T , Gonzalez C , Grossetete S , Guldener U , Henrissat B , Howlett BJ , Kodira C , Kretschmer M , Lappartient A , Leroch M , Levis C , Mauceli E , Neuveglise C , Oeser B , Pearson M , Poulain J , Poussereau N , Quesneville H , Rascle C , Schumacher J , Segurens B , Sexton A , Silva E , Sirven C , Soanes DM , Talbot NJ , Templeton M , Yandava C , Yarden O , Zeng Q , Rollins JA , Lebrun MH , Dickman M
Ref : PLoS Genet , 7 :e1002230 , 2011
Abstract : Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are closely related necrotrophic plant pathogenic fungi notable for their wide host ranges and environmental persistence. These attributes have made these species models for understanding the complexity of necrotrophic, broad host-range pathogenicity. Despite their similarities, the two species differ in mating behaviour and the ability to produce asexual spores. We have sequenced the genomes of one strain of S. sclerotiorum and two strains of B. cinerea. The comparative analysis of these genomes relative to one another and to other sequenced fungal genomes is provided here. Their 38-39 Mb genomes include 11,860-14,270 predicted genes, which share 83% amino acid identity on average between the two species. We have mapped the S. sclerotiorum assembly to 16 chromosomes and found large-scale co-linearity with the B. cinerea genomes. Seven percent of the S. sclerotiorum genome comprises transposable elements compared to <1% of B. cinerea. The arsenal of genes associated with necrotrophic processes is similar between the species, including genes involved in plant cell wall degradation and oxalic acid production. Analysis of secondary metabolism gene clusters revealed an expansion in number and diversity of B. cinerea-specific secondary metabolites relative to S. sclerotiorum. The potential diversity in secondary metabolism might be involved in adaptation to specific ecological niches. Comparative genome analysis revealed the basis of differing sexual mating compatibility systems between S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. The organization of the mating-type loci differs, and their structures provide evidence for the evolution of heterothallism from homothallism. These data shed light on the evolutionary and mechanistic bases of the genetically complex traits of necrotrophic pathogenicity and sexual mating. This resource should facilitate the functional studies designed to better understand what makes these fungi such successful and persistent pathogens of agronomic crops.
ESTHER : Amselem_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002230
PubMedSearch : Amselem_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002230
PubMedID: 21876677
Gene_locus related to this paper: botci-cutas , botci-q6rki2 , botf4-g2y7k8 , botfb-dapb , botfu-g2xyd8 , botfu-g2ynh8 , scls1-a7e814 , scls1-a7edc9 , scls1-a7edh1 , scls1-a7emm0 , scls1-a7eti8 , scls1-a7eu48 , scls1-a7f208 , scls1-dapb , botf4-g2xqp7 , scls1-a7eqq8 , botf4-g2xqc6 , scls1-a7ebs4 , botf4-g2xn51 , scls1-a7f5m9 , botf4-g2xti4 , botf4-g2xtu7 , botf4-g2yfp1 , scls1-a7f534 , botf4-g2yys3 , scls1-a7erz9 , botf4-g2y037 , botf4-g2y0e1 , scls1-a7f706 , scls1-a7ewt6 , botf4-g2yuj6 , botf1-m7u3d1 , botf1-m7u430 , botf1-m7tei8 , botf1-m7u0w9 , botf1-m7tij6 , botf1-m7u819 , botf1-m7u6d8 , botf1-m7tzd4 , botf1-m7tqd7 , botf1-m7tyz9 , botf1-m7unl9 , botf1-m7u429 , botf1-m7u4s5 , botf1-m7ul92 , botf1-m7tx42 , botf1-m7u9h4 , botf1-m7u187 , botf1-m7uz64 , botf1-m7u4q4 , botf1-m7u2f6 , botf1-m7tt59 , botf1-m7v3h2 , botf1-m7u6c9 , botf1-m7tud9 , botf1-m7u309 , scls1-a7et87 , botf4-g2ylt4 , scls1-a7f5a0 , scls1-a7f900 , botf4-g2yib9 , scls1-a7f3m9 , scls1-a7er46 , botf4-g2y3y4 , botf4-g2xyy5 , botf1-m7uct5 , scls1-a7ea78 , scls1-kex1 , scls1-cbpya , botfb-cbpya , scls1-a7ecx1

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx