Kodira CD

References (15)

Title : Comparative genomics of a plant-pathogenic fungus, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, reveals transduplication and the impact of repeat elements on pathogenicity and population divergence - Manning_2013_G3.(Bethesda)_3_41
Author(s) : Manning VA , Pandelova I , Dhillon B , Wilhelm LJ , Goodwin SB , Berlin AM , Figueroa M , Freitag M , Hane JK , Henrissat B , Holman WH , Kodira CD , Martin J , Oliver RP , Robbertse B , Schackwitz W , Schwartz DC , Spatafora JW , Turgeon BG , Yandava C , Young S , Zhou S , Zeng Q , Grigoriev IV , Ma LJ , Ciuffetti LM
Ref : G3 (Bethesda) , 3 :41 , 2013
Abstract : Pyrenophora tritici-repentis is a necrotrophic fungus causal to the disease tan spot of wheat, whose contribution to crop loss has increased significantly during the last few decades. Pathogenicity by this fungus is attributed to the production of host-selective toxins (HST), which are recognized by their host in a genotype-specific manner. To better understand the mechanisms that have led to the increase in disease incidence related to this pathogen, we sequenced the genomes of three P. tritici-repentis isolates. A pathogenic isolate that produces two known HSTs was used to assemble a reference nuclear genome of approximately 40 Mb composed of 11 chromosomes that encode 12,141 predicted genes. Comparison of the reference genome with those of a pathogenic isolate that produces a third HST, and a nonpathogenic isolate, showed the nonpathogen genome to be more diverged than those of the two pathogens. Examination of gene-coding regions has provided candidate pathogen-specific proteins and revealed gene families that may play a role in a necrotrophic lifestyle. Analysis of transposable elements suggests that their presence in the genome of pathogenic isolates contributes to the creation of novel genes, effector diversification, possible horizontal gene transfer events, identified copy number variation, and the first example of transduplication by DNA transposable elements in fungi. Overall, comparative analysis of these genomes provides evidence that pathogenicity in this species arose through an influx of transposable elements, which created a genetically flexible landscape that can easily respond to environmental changes.
ESTHER : Manning_2013_G3.(Bethesda)_3_41
PubMedSearch : Manning_2013_G3.(Bethesda)_3_41
PubMedID: 23316438
Gene_locus related to this paper: pyrtr-b2vxe8 , pyrtr-b2vvm1 , pyrtr-b2vzr5 , pyrtr-b2vu22 , pyrtr-kex1

Title : Comparative genomic analysis of human fungal pathogens causing paracoccidioidomycosis - Desjardins_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002345
Author(s) : Desjardins CA , Champion MD , Holder JW , Muszewska A , Goldberg J , Bailao AM , Brigido MM , Ferreira ME , Garcia AM , Grynberg M , Gujja S , Heiman DI , Henn MR , Kodira CD , Leon-Narvaez H , Longo LV , Ma LJ , Malavazi I , Matsuo AL , Morais FV , Pereira M , Rodriguez-Brito S , Sakthikumar S , Salem-Izacc SM , Sykes SM , Teixeira MM , Vallejo MC , Walter ME , Yandava C , Young S , Zeng Q , Zucker J , Felipe MS , Goldman GH , Haas BJ , McEwen JG , Nino-Vega G , Puccia R , San-Blas G , Soares CMF , Birren BW , Cuomo CA
Ref : PLoS Genet , 7 :e1002345 , 2011
Abstract : Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of Onygenales to transfer from soil to animal hosts.
ESTHER : Desjardins_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002345
PubMedSearch : Desjardins_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002345
PubMedID: 22046142
Gene_locus related to this paper: parbd-c1gc95 , parbp-c0s0d7 , parbp-c0s257 , parbd-c1g8z9 , parba-c1grf0 , parbp-c0s816 , parbp-c0s5g4 , parbd-c1g5f5 , parbd-c1fzf9 , parba-kex1 , parbd-kex1 , parbp-kex1 , parba-cbpya , parbp-cbpya

Title : Obligate biotrophy features unraveled by the genomic analysis of rust fungi - Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
Author(s) : Duplessis S , Cuomo CA , Lin YC , Aerts A , Tisserant E , Veneault-Fourrey C , Joly DL , Hacquard S , Amselem J , Cantarel BL , Chiu R , Coutinho PM , Feau N , Field M , Frey P , Gelhaye E , Goldberg J , Grabherr MG , Kodira CD , Kohler A , Kues U , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Mago R , Mauceli E , Morin E , Murat C , Pangilinan JL , Park R , Pearson M , Quesneville H , Rouhier N , Sakthikumar S , Salamov AA , Schmutz J , Selles B , Shapiro H , Tanguay P , Tuskan GA , Henrissat B , Van de Peer Y , Rouze P , Ellis JG , Dodds PN , Schein JE , Zhong S , Hamelin RC , Grigoriev IV , Szabo LJ , Martin F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 108 :9166 , 2011
Abstract : Rust fungi are some of the most devastating pathogens of crop plants. They are obligate biotrophs, which extract nutrients only from living plant tissues and cannot grow apart from their hosts. Their lifestyle has slowed the dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying host invasion and avoidance or suppression of plant innate immunity. We sequenced the 101-Mb genome of Melampsora larici-populina, the causal agent of poplar leaf rust, and the 89-Mb genome of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat and barley stem rust. We then compared the 16,399 predicted proteins of M. larici-populina with the 17,773 predicted proteins of P. graminis f. sp tritici. Genomic features related to their obligate biotrophic lifestyle include expanded lineage-specific gene families, a large repertoire of effector-like small secreted proteins, impaired nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways, and expanded families of amino acid and oligopeptide membrane transporters. The dramatic up-regulation of transcripts coding for small secreted proteins, secreted hydrolytic enzymes, and transporters in planta suggests that they play a role in host infection and nutrient acquisition. Some of these genomic hallmarks are mirrored in the genomes of other microbial eukaryotes that have independently evolved to infect plants, indicating convergent adaptation to a biotrophic existence inside plant cells.
ESTHER : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedSearch : Duplessis_2011_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_108_9166
PubMedID: 21536894
Gene_locus related to this paper: pucgt-e3k840 , pucgt-e3kaq6 , pucgt-e3kw59 , pucgt-e3kz16 , pucgt-e3l9v6 , pucgt-e3l279 , pucgt-h6qt25 , mellp-f4reh4 , mellp-f4rhc8 , mellp-f4reh2 , mellp-f4r3y0 , mellp-f4rz15 , mellp-f4rz64 , mellp-f4rl14 , mellp-f4rz66 , mellp-f4s751 , mellp-f4s2g6 , pucgt-e3l1z7 , pucgt-e3l803 , pucgt-e3kst2 , pucgt-e3kst5 , mellp-f4ru03 , pucgt-e3l1z8 , pucgt-e3ktz7 , pucgt-e3jun4 , mellp-f4rl65 , mellp-f4rz16 , mellp-f4ru02 , mellp-f4sav4 , mellp-f4sav3 , mellp-f4s1j0 , mellp-f4rkp0 , mellp-f4s483 , pucgt-e3kzu5 , pucgt-h6qtq8 , mellp-f4r5l5 , pucgt-e3krw7 , pucgt-e3l7w5 , pucgt-e3k2w6 , pucgt-e3kfg2 , pucgt-kex1

Title : Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium - Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
Author(s) : Ma LJ , van der Does HC , Borkovich KA , Coleman JJ , Daboussi MJ , Di Pietro A , Dufresne M , Freitag M , Grabherr M , Henrissat B , Houterman PM , Kang S , Shim WB , Woloshuk C , Xie X , Xu JR , Antoniw J , Baker SE , Bluhm BH , Breakspear A , Brown DW , Butchko RA , Chapman S , Coulson R , Coutinho PM , Danchin EG , Diener A , Gale LR , Gardiner DM , Goff S , Hammond-Kosack KE , Hilburn K , Hua-Van A , Jonkers W , Kazan K , Kodira CD , Koehrsen M , Kumar L , Lee YH , Li L , Manners JM , Miranda-Saavedra D , Mukherjee M , Park G , Park J , Park SY , Proctor RH , Regev A , Ruiz-Roldan MC , Sain D , Sakthikumar S , Sykes S , Schwartz DC , Turgeon BG , Wapinski I , Yoder O , Young S , Zeng Q , Zhou S , Galagan J , Cuomo CA , Kistler HC , Rep M
Ref : Nature , 464 :367 , 2010
Abstract : Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes and account for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity, indicative of horizontal acquisition. Experimentally, we demonstrate the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, converting a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in F. oxysporum. These findings put the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.
ESTHER : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedSearch : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedID: 20237561
Gene_locus related to this paper: fusox-a0a1d3s5h0 , gibf5-fus2 , fusof-f9f2k2 , fusof-f9f3l6 , fusof-f9f6t8 , fusof-f9f6v2 , fusof-f9f132 , fusof-f9f781 , fusof-f9fd72 , fusof-f9fd90 , fusof-f9fem0 , fusof-f9fhk2 , fusof-f9fj19 , fusof-f9fj20 , fusof-f9fki8 , fusof-f9fmx2 , fusof-f9fnt4 , fusof-f9fpy4 , fusof-f9fvs6 , fusof-f9fwu0 , fusof-f9fxz4 , fusof-f9fzy5 , fusof-f9g2a2 , fusof-f9g3b1 , fusof-f9g5h7 , fusof-f9g6e6 , fusof-f9g6y7 , fusof-f9g7b0 , fusof-f9g797 , fusof-f9g972 , fusof-f9ga50 , fusof-f9gck4 , fusof-f9gd15 , gibze-a8w610 , gibze-b1pdn0 , gibze-i1r9e6 , gibze-i1rda9 , gibze-i1rdk7 , gibze-i1rec8 , gibze-i1rgs0 , gibze-i1rgy0 , gibze-i1rh52 , gibze-i1rhi8 , gibze-i1rig9 , gibze-i1rip5 , gibze-i1rpg6 , gibze-i1rsg2 , gibze-i1rv36 , gibze-i1rxm5 , gibze-i1rxp8 , gibze-i1rxv5 , gibze-i1s1u3 , gibze-i1s3j9 , gibze-i1s6l7 , gibze-i1s8i8 , gibze-i1s9x4 , gibze-q4huy1 , gibze-i1rg17 , fuso4-j9mvr9 , fuso4-j9ngs6 , fuso4-j9niq8 , fuso4-j9nqm2 , gibze-i1rb76 , gibze-i1s1m7 , gibze-i1s3z6 , gibze-i1rd78 , gibze-i1rgl9 , gibze-i1rjp7 , gibze-i1s1q6 , gibze-i1ri35 , gibze-i1rf76 , gibze-i1rhp3 , fusc1-n4uj11 , fusc4-n1s9p6 , gibf5-s0dqr2 , gibm7-w7n1b5 , fusof-f9g6q0 , gibm7-w7n497 , fusox-x0bme4 , gibm7-w7mcf8 , gibm7-w7mak5 , fusox-x0a2c5 , gibm7-w7mum7 , fusox-w9iyc7 , gibm7-w7maw6 , gibm7-w7msi0 , gibm7-w7luf0 , gibm7-w7msa3 , gibm7-w7mna8 , gibm7-w7n8b7 , gibm7-w7n564 , fusox-w9jpi0 , gibm7-w7ngc3 , gibm7-w7m4v6 , gibm7-w7m4v2 , gibm7-w7lt61 , gibm7-w7mly6 , gibm7-w7ncn3 , fusox-w9ibd7 , fusof-f9fnm6 , gibm7-w7n526 , gibza-a0a016pda4 , gibza-a0a016pl96 , gibm7-w7muq1 , fusof-f9gfd3 , gibm7-w7mt52 , gibze-i1rjb5 , gibf5-s0ehu3 , fusox-w9hvf0 , gibze-i1rkc4 , gibm7-w7mv30 , gibze-a0a1c3ylb1 , fuso4-a0a0c4diy4 , gibm7-w7n4n0 , gibze-gra11 , gibze-fsl2 , gibf5-fub4 , gibf5-fub5 , gibf5-fus5 , gibm7-dlh1

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : Genomic analysis of the basal lineage fungus Rhizopus oryzae reveals a whole-genome duplication - Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
Author(s) : Ma LJ , Ibrahim AS , Skory C , Grabherr MG , Burger G , Butler M , Elias M , Idnurm A , Lang BF , Sone T , Abe A , Calvo SE , Corrochano LM , Engels R , Fu J , Hansberg W , Kim JM , Kodira CD , Koehrsen MJ , Liu B , Miranda-Saavedra D , O'Leary S , Ortiz-Castellanos L , Poulter R , Rodriguez-Romero J , Ruiz-Herrera J , Shen YQ , Zeng Q , Galagan J , Birren BW , Cuomo CA , Wickes BL
Ref : PLoS Genet , 5 :e1000549 , 2009
Abstract : Rhizopus oryzae is the primary cause of mucormycosis, an emerging, life-threatening infection characterized by rapid angioinvasive growth with an overall mortality rate that exceeds 50%. As a representative of the paraphyletic basal group of the fungal kingdom called "zygomycetes," R. oryzae is also used as a model to study fungal evolution. Here we report the genome sequence of R. oryzae strain 99-880, isolated from a fatal case of mucormycosis. The highly repetitive 45.3 Mb genome assembly contains abundant transposable elements (TEs), comprising approximately 20% of the genome. We predicted 13,895 protein-coding genes not overlapping TEs, many of which are paralogous gene pairs. The order and genomic arrangement of the duplicated gene pairs and their common phylogenetic origin provide evidence for an ancestral whole-genome duplication (WGD) event. The WGD resulted in the duplication of nearly all subunits of the protein complexes associated with respiratory electron transport chains, the V-ATPase, and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. The WGD, together with recent gene duplications, resulted in the expansion of multiple gene families related to cell growth and signal transduction, as well as secreted aspartic protease and subtilase protein families, which are known fungal virulence factors. The duplication of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway, especially the major azole target, lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11), could contribute to the variable responses of R. oryzae to different azole drugs, including voriconazole and posaconazole. Expanded families of cell-wall synthesis enzymes, essential for fungal cell integrity but absent in mammalian hosts, reveal potential targets for novel and R. oryzae-specific diagnostic and therapeutic treatments.
ESTHER : Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
PubMedSearch : Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
PubMedID: 19578406

Title : Genome sequence and analysis of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans - Haas_2009_Nature_461_393
Author(s) : Haas BJ , Kamoun S , Zody MC , Jiang RH , Handsaker RE , Cano LM , Grabherr M , Kodira CD , Raffaele S , Torto-Alalibo T , Bozkurt TO , Ah-Fong AM , Alvarado L , Anderson VL , Armstrong MR , Avrova A , Baxter L , Beynon J , Boevink PC , Bollmann SR , Bos JI , Bulone V , Cai G , Cakir C , Carrington JC , Chawner M , Conti L , Costanzo S , Ewan R , Fahlgren N , Fischbach MA , Fugelstad J , Gilroy EM , Gnerre S , Green PJ , Grenville-Briggs LJ , Griffith J , Grunwald NJ , Horn K , Horner NR , Hu CH , Huitema E , Jeong DH , Jones AM , Jones JD , Jones RW , Karlsson EK , Kunjeti SG , Lamour K , Liu Z , Ma L , Maclean D , Chibucos MC , McDonald H , McWalters J , Meijer HJ , Morgan W , Morris PF , Munro CA , O'Neill K , Ospina-Giraldo M , Pinzon A , Pritchard L , Ramsahoye B , Ren Q , Restrepo S , Roy S , Sadanandom A , Savidor A , Schornack S , Schwartz DC , Schumann UD , Schwessinger B , Seyer L , Sharpe T , Silvar C , Song J , Studholme DJ , Sykes S , Thines M , van de Vondervoort PJ , Phuntumart V , Wawra S , Weide R , Win J , Young C , Zhou S , Fry W , Meyers BC , van West P , Ristaino J , Govers F , Birch PR , Whisson SC , Judelson HS , Nusbaum C
Ref : Nature , 461 :393 , 2009
Abstract : Phytophthora infestans is the most destructive pathogen of potato and a model organism for the oomycetes, a distinct lineage of fungus-like eukaryotes that are related to organisms such as brown algae and diatoms. As the agent of the Irish potato famine in the mid-nineteenth century, P. infestans has had a tremendous effect on human history, resulting in famine and population displacement. To this day, it affects world agriculture by causing the most destructive disease of potato, the fourth largest food crop and a critical alternative to the major cereal crops for feeding the world's population. Current annual worldwide potato crop losses due to late blight are conservatively estimated at $$6.7 billion. Management of this devastating pathogen is challenged by its remarkable speed of adaptation to control strategies such as genetically resistant cultivars. Here we report the sequence of the P. infestans genome, which at approximately 240 megabases (Mb) is by far the largest and most complex genome sequenced so far in the chromalveolates. Its expansion results from a proliferation of repetitive DNA accounting for approximately 74% of the genome. Comparison with two other Phytophthora genomes showed rapid turnover and extensive expansion of specific families of secreted disease effector proteins, including many genes that are induced during infection or are predicted to have activities that alter host physiology. These fast-evolving effector genes are localized to highly dynamic and expanded regions of the P. infestans genome. This probably plays a crucial part in the rapid adaptability of the pathogen to host plants and underpins its evolutionary potential.
ESTHER : Haas_2009_Nature_461_393
PubMedSearch : Haas_2009_Nature_461_393
PubMedID: 19741609
Gene_locus related to this paper: phyin-ENDO2 , phyin-q2m440 , phyin-q58g92 , phyit-d0mqp1 , phyit-d0mqp2 , phyit-d0mt75 , phyit-d0muv1 , phyit-d0mv34 , phyit-d0mv35 , phyit-d0mwf9 , phyit-d0mxu5 , phyit-d0n935 , phyit-d0nax9 , phyit-d0nfs3 , phyit-d0nhj2 , phyit-d0nhj4 , phyit-d0nhj8 , phyit-d0ni28 , phyit-d0nj14 , phyit-d0nj53 , phyit-d0nj54 , phyit-d0njf2 , phyit-d0nkm4 , phyit-d0nr53 , phyit-d0nrb1 , phyit-d0nrk9 , phyit-d0nrl4 , phyit-d0ns26 , phyit-d0ns42 , phyit-d0ns43 , phyit-d0nsr8 , phyit-d0nu41 , phyit-d0nvt3 , phyit-d0nwb6 , phyit-d0nwm8 , phyit-d0nzc0 , phyit-d0nzc1 , phyit-d0p0z1 , phyit-d0p3z2 , phyit-kex1 , phyit-d0n6q6 , phyit-d0n4i8 , phyit-d0mqf7 , phyit-d0n5g6

Title : Comparative genomic analyses of the human fungal pathogens Coccidioides and their relatives - Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
Author(s) : Sharpton TJ , Stajich JE , Rounsley SD , Gardner MJ , Wortman JR , Jordar VS , Maiti R , Kodira CD , Neafsey DE , Zeng Q , Hung CY , McMahan C , Muszewska A , Grynberg M , Mandel MA , Kellner EM , Barker BM , Galgiani JN , Orbach MJ , Kirkland TN , Cole GT , Henn MR , Birren BW , Taylor JW
Ref : Genome Res , 19 :1722 , 2009
Abstract : While most Ascomycetes tend to associate principally with plants, the dimorphic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are primary pathogens of immunocompetent mammals, including humans. Infection results from environmental exposure to Coccidiodies, which is believed to grow as a soil saprophyte in arid deserts. To investigate hypotheses about the life history and evolution of Coccidioides, the genomes of several Onygenales, including C. immitis and C. posadasii; a close, nonpathogenic relative, Uncinocarpus reesii; and a more diverged pathogenic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, were sequenced and compared with those of 13 more distantly related Ascomycetes. This analysis identified increases and decreases in gene family size associated with a host/substrate shift from plants to animals in the Onygenales. In addition, comparison among Onygenales genomes revealed evolutionary changes in Coccidioides that may underlie its infectious phenotype, the identification of which may facilitate improved treatment and prevention of coccidioidomycosis. Overall, the results suggest that Coccidioides species are not soil saprophytes, but that they have evolved to remain associated with their dead animal hosts in soil, and that Coccidioides metabolism genes, membrane-related proteins, and putatively antigenic compounds have evolved in response to interaction with an animal host.
ESTHER : Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
PubMedSearch : Sharpton_2009_Genome.Res_19_1722
PubMedID: 19717792
Gene_locus related to this paper: ajecg-c0nbn5 , ajecg-c0nbz4 , ajecg-c0ndw0 , ajecg-c0nqc6 , ajecg-c0nst6 , ajecg-c0ntx5 , ajecg-c0nu33 , ajecg-c0nzh6 , ajecg-c0p0h0 , ajech-c6h1y9 , ajecn-a6qs62 , ajecn-a6quy7 , ajecn-a6r2c0 , ajecn-a6r491 , ajecn-a6r635 , ajecn-a6rab7 , ajecn-a6ram0 , ajecn-a6rf08 , ajecn-a6rf70 , ajecn-atg15 , ajecn-dapb , ajeds-c5jqx1 , cocim-atg15 , cocim-bst1 , cocim-j3k8a1 , cocp7-c5p0f2 , cocp7-c5p0i6 , cocp7-c5p1s3 , cocp7-c5p1u2 , cocp7-c5p2u8 , cocp7-c5p4s8 , cocp7-c5p4z1 , cocp7-c5p5s7 , cocp7-c5p129 , cocp7-c5p172 , cocp7-c5p250 , cocps-e9ctz7 , cocp7-c5pae0 , cocp7-c5pby4 , cocp7-c5pdn8 , cocp7-c5pdv9 , cocp7-c5pe69 , cocp7-c5pf68 , cocp7-c5pgk6 , cocp7-c5pid0 , cocp7-dapb , cocps-e9cz73 , cocps-e9dbi4 , cocps-e9dbu0 , cocps-e9dfh7 , uncre-c4jf72 , uncre-c4jf79 , uncre-c4ji27 , uncre-c4jj62 , uncre-c4jjs9 , uncre-c4jk71 , uncre-c4jlm9 , uncre-c4jlp5 , uncre-c4jlr7 , uncre-c4jnk2 , uncre-c4jnn3 , uncre-c4juj6 , uncre-c4jve9 , uncre-c4jvh5 , uncre-c4jw09 , uncre-c4jyw9 , uncre-c4jzs5 , uncre-dapb , ajech-c6h9r4 , uncre-c4jds5 , cocp7-c5pii3 , ajecn-a6r5v8 , cocim-j3ka92 , cocp7-c5phc6 , ajecn-a6qtc4 , ajecn-a6r145 , cocps-e9d3i4 , cocp7-c5p7x1 , cocps-e9csw0 , ajecg-c0nww6 , ajecn-kex1 , uncre-kex1 , uncre-cbpya , cocps-kex1 , ajecn-cbpya

Title : Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15 - Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
Author(s) : Zody MC , Garber M , Sharpe T , Young SK , Rowen L , O'Neill K , Whittaker CA , Kamal M , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Kodira CD , Madan A , Qin S , Yang X , Abbasi N , Abouelleil A , Arachchi HM , Baradarani L , Birditt B , Bloom S , Bloom T , Borowsky ML , Burke J , Butler J , Cook A , DeArellano K , Decaprio D , Dorris L, 3rd , Dors M , Eichler EE , Engels R , Fahey J , Fleetwood P , Friedman C , Gearin G , Hall JL , Hensley G , Johnson E , Jones C , Kamat A , Kaur A , Locke DP , Munson G , Jaffe DB , Lui A , Macdonald P , Mauceli E , Naylor JW , Nesbitt R , Nicol R , O'Leary SB , Ratcliffe A , Rounsley S , She X , Sneddon KM , Stewart S , Sougnez C , Stone SM , Topham K , Vincent D , Wang S , Zimmer AR , Birren BW , Hood L , Lander ES , Nusbaum C
Ref : Nature , 440 :671 , 2006
Abstract : Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome.
ESTHER : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedSearch : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedID: 16572171
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-DPP8 , human-LIPC , human-SPG21

Title : DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8 - Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
Author(s) : Nusbaum C , Mikkelsen TS , Zody MC , Asakawa S , Taudien S , Garber M , Kodira CD , Schueler MG , Shimizu A , Whittaker CA , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Yang X , Allen NR , Anderson S , Asakawa T , Blechschmidt K , Bloom T , Borowsky ML , Butler J , Cook A , Corum B , DeArellano K , Decaprio D , Dooley KT , Dorris L, 3rd , Engels R , Glockner G , Hafez N , Hagopian DS , Hall JL , Ishikawa SK , Jaffe DB , Kamat A , Kudoh J , Lehmann R , Lokitsang T , Macdonald P , Major JE , Matthews CD , Mauceli E , Menzel U , Mihalev AH , Minoshima S , Murayama Y , Naylor JW , Nicol R , Nguyen C , O'Leary SB , O'Neill K , Parker SC , Polley A , Raymond CK , Reichwald K , Rodriguez J , Sasaki T , Schilhabel M , Siddiqui R , Smith CL , Sneddon TP , Talamas JA , Tenzin P , Topham K , Venkataraman V , Wen G , Yamazaki S , Young SK , Zeng Q , Zimmer AR , Rosenthal A , Birren BW , Platzer M , Shimizu N , Lander ES
Ref : Nature , 439 :331 , 2006
Abstract : The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution.
ESTHER : Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
PubMedSearch : Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
PubMedID: 16421571
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-TG

Title : DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18 - Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
Author(s) : Nusbaum C , Zody MC , Borowsky ML , Kamal M , Kodira CD , Taylor TD , Whittaker CA , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Yang X , Abouelleil A , Allen NR , Anderson S , Bloom T , Bugalter B , Butler J , Cook A , Decaprio D , Engels R , Garber M , Gnirke A , Hafez N , Hall JL , Norman CH , Itoh T , Jaffe DB , Kuroki Y , Lehoczky J , Lui A , Macdonald P , Mauceli E , Mikkelsen TS , Naylor JW , Nicol R , Nguyen C , Noguchi H , O'Leary SB , O'Neill K , Piqani B , Smith CL , Talamas JA , Topham K , Totoki Y , Toyoda A , Wain HM , Young SK , Zeng Q , Zimmer AR , Fujiyama A , Hattori M , Birren BW , Sakaki Y , Lander ES
Ref : Nature , 437 :551 , 2005
Abstract : Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements.
ESTHER : Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
PubMedSearch : Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
PubMedID: 16177791
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LIPG

Title : The complete genome and proteome of Mycoplasma mobile - Jaffe_2004_Genome.Res_14_1447
Author(s) : Jaffe JD , Stange-Thomann N , Smith C , Decaprio D , Fisher S , Butler J , Calvo S , Elkins T , Fitzgerald MG , Hafez N , Kodira CD , Major J , Wang S , Wilkinson J , Nicol R , Nusbaum C , Birren B , Berg HC , Church GM
Ref : Genome Res , 14 :1447 , 2004
Abstract : Although often considered "minimal" organisms, mycoplasmas show a wide range of diversity with respect to host environment, phenotypic traits, and pathogenicity. Here we report the complete genomic sequence and proteogenomic map for the piscine mycoplasma Mycoplasma mobile, noted for its robust gliding motility. For the first time, proteomic data are used in the primary annotation of a new genome, providing validation of expression for many of the predicted proteins. Several novel features were discovered including a long repeating unit of DNA of approximately 2435 bp present in five complete copies that are shown to code for nearly identical yet uniquely expressed proteins. M. mobile has among the lowest DNA GC contents (24.9%) and most reduced set of tRNAs of any organism yet reported (28). Numerous instances of tandem duplication as well as lateral gene transfer are evident in the genome. The multiple available complete genome sequences for other motile and immotile mycoplasmas enabled us to use comparative genomic and phylogenetic methods to suggest several candidate genes that might be involved in motility. The results of these analyses leave open the possibility that gliding motility might have arisen independently more than once in the mycoplasma lineage.
ESTHER : Jaffe_2004_Genome.Res_14_1447
PubMedSearch : Jaffe_2004_Genome.Res_14_1447
PubMedID: 15289470
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycmo-q6ki90 , mycmo-q6kim4

Title : A comparison of whole-genome shotgun-derived mouse chromosome 16 and the human genome - Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
Author(s) : Mural RJ , Adams MD , Myers EW , Smith HO , Miklos GL , Wides R , Halpern A , Li PW , Sutton GG , Nadeau J , Salzberg SL , Holt RA , Kodira CD , Lu F , Chen L , Deng Z , Evangelista CC , Gan W , Heiman TJ , Li J , Li Z , Merkulov GV , Milshina NV , Naik AK , Qi R , Shue BC , Wang A , Wang J , Wang X , Yan X , Ye J , Yooseph S , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhu SC , Biddick K , Bolanos R , Delcher AL , Dew IM , Fasulo D , Flanigan MJ , Huson DH , Kravitz SA , Miller JR , Mobarry CM , Reinert K , Remington KA , Zhang Q , Zheng XH , Nusskern DR , Lai Z , Lei Y , Zhong W , Yao A , Guan P , Ji RR , Gu Z , Wang ZY , Zhong F , Xiao C , Chiang CC , Yandell M , Wortman JR , Amanatides PG , Hladun SL , Pratts EC , Johnson JE , Dodson KL , Woodford KJ , Evans CA , Gropman B , Rusch DB , Venter E , Wang M , Smith TJ , Houck JT , Tompkins DE , Haynes C , Jacob D , Chin SH , Allen DR , Dahlke CE , Sanders R , Li K , Liu X , Levitsky AA , Majoros WH , Chen Q , Xia AC , Lopez JR , Donnelly MT , Newman MH , Glodek A , Kraft CL , Nodell M , Ali F , An HJ , Baldwin-Pitts D , Beeson KY , Cai S , Carnes M , Carver A , Caulk PM , Center A , Chen YH , Cheng ML , Coyne MD , Crowder M , Danaher S , Davenport LB , Desilets R , Dietz SM , Doup L , Dullaghan P , Ferriera S , Fosler CR , Gire HC , Gluecksmann A , Gocayne JD , Gray J , Hart B , Haynes J , Hoover J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Johns D , Kline L , Ma DS , MacCawley S , Magoon A , Mann F , May D , McIntosh TC , Mehta S , Moy L , Moy MC , Murphy BJ , Murphy SD , Nelson KA , Nuri Z , Parker KA , Prudhomme AC , Puri VN , Qureshi H , Raley JC , Reardon MS , Regier MA , Rogers YH , Romblad DL , Schutz J , Scott JL , Scott R , Sitter CD , Smallwood M , Sprague AC , Stewart E , Strong RV , Suh E , Sylvester K , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tsonis C , Wang G , Williams MS , Williams SM , Windsor SM , Wolfe K , Wu MM , Zaveri J , Chaturvedi K , Gabrielian AE , Ke Z , Sun J , Subramanian G , Venter JC , Pfannkoch CM , Barnstead M , Stephenson LD
Ref : Science , 296 :1661 , 2002
Abstract : The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.
ESTHER : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedSearch : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedID: 12040188
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-ABH15 , mouse-Ces3b , mouse-Ces4a , mouse-dpp4 , mouse-FAP , mouse-Lipg , mouse-Q8C1A9 , mouse-rbbp9 , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-w4vsp6

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3