Kenton S

References (4)

Title : Genome sequence of a nephritogenic and highly transformable M49 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes - McShan_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_7773
Author(s) : McShan WM , Ferretti JJ , Karasawa T , Suvorov AN , Lin S , Qin B , Jia H , Kenton S , Najar F , Wu H , Scott J , Roe BA , Savic DJ
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 190 :7773 , 2008
Abstract : The 1,815,783-bp genome of a serotype M49 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]), strain NZ131, has been determined. This GAS strain (FCT type 3; emm pattern E), originally isolated from a case of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, is unusually competent for electrotransformation and has been used extensively as a model organism for both basic genetic and pathogenesis investigations. As with the previously sequenced S. pyogenes genomes, three unique prophages are a major source of genetic diversity. Two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions were present in the genome, providing genetic information on previous prophage encounters. A unique cluster of genes was found in the pathogenicity island-like emm region that included a novel Nudix hydrolase, and, further, this cluster appears to be specific for serotype M49 and M82 strains. Nudix hydrolases eliminate potentially hazardous materials or prevent the unbalanced accumulation of normal metabolites; in bacteria, these enzymes may play a role in host cell invasion. Since M49 S. pyogenes strains have been known to be associated with skin infections, the Nudix hydrolase and its associated genes may have a role in facilitating survival in an environment that is more variable and unpredictable than the uniform warmth and moisture of the throat. The genome of NZ131 continues to shed light upon the evolutionary history of this human pathogen. Apparent horizontal transfer of genetic material has led to the existence of highly variable virulence-associated regions that are marked by multiple rearrangements and genetic diversification while other regions, even those associated with virulence, vary little between genomes. The genome regions that encode surface gene products that will interact with host targets or aid in immune avoidance are the ones that display the most sequence diversity. Thus, while natural selection favors stability in much of the genome, it favors diversity in these regions.
ESTHER : McShan_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_7773
PubMedSearch : McShan_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_7773
PubMedID: 18820018
Gene_locus related to this paper: strpy-ESTA , strpy-PEPXP , strpy-SPY1308

Title : Genome sequence of Streptococcus mutans UA159, a cariogenic dental pathogen - Ajdic_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_14434
Author(s) : Ajdic D , McShan WM , McLaughlin RE , Savic G , Chang J , Carson MB , Primeaux C , Tian R , Kenton S , Jia H , Lin S , Qian Y , Li S , Zhu H , Najar F , Lai H , White J , Roe BA , Ferretti JJ
Ref : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 99 :14434 , 2002
Abstract : Streptococcus mutans is the leading cause of dental caries (tooth decay) worldwide and is considered to be the most cariogenic of all of the oral streptococci. The genome of S. mutans UA159, a serotype c strain, has been completely sequenced and is composed of 2,030,936 base pairs. It contains 1,963 ORFs, 63% of which have been assigned putative functions. The genome analysis provides further insight into how S. mutans has adapted to surviving the oral environment through resource acquisition, defense against host factors, and use of gene products that maintain its niche against microbial competitors. S. mutans metabolizes a wide variety of carbohydrates via nonoxidative pathways, and all of these pathways have been identified, along with the associated transport systems whose genes account for almost 15% of the genome. Virulence genes associated with extracellular adherent glucan production, adhesins, acid tolerance, proteases, and putative hemolysins have been identified. Strain UA159 is naturally competent and contains all of the genes essential for competence and quorum sensing. Mobile genetic elements in the form of IS elements and transposons are prominent in the genome and include a previously uncharacterized conjugative transposon and a composite transposon containing genes for the synthesis of antibiotics of the gramicidin/bacitracin family; however, no bacteriophage genomes are present.
ESTHER : Ajdic_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_14434
PubMedSearch : Ajdic_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_14434
PubMedID: 12397186
Gene_locus related to this paper: strmu-BACT , strmu-BGLB , strmu-GBPD , strmu-pepx , strmu-SMU.118C , strmu-SMU.178 , strmu-SMU.633 , strmu-SMU.643 , strmu-SMU.737 , strmu-SMU.1028 , strmu-SMU.1071C , strmu-SMU.1280C , strmu-SMU.1314 , strmu-SMU.1319C , strmu-SMU.1337C , strmu-SMU.1393C , strmu-SMU.1443C , strmu-SMU.1482C , strmu-SMU.1678

Title : Complete genome sequence of an M1 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes - Ferretti_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4658
Author(s) : Ferretti JJ , McShan WM , Ajdic D , Savic DJ , Savic G , Lyon K , Primeaux C , Sezate S , Suvorov AN , Kenton S , Lai HS , Lin SP , Qian Y , Jia HG , Najar FZ , Ren Q , Zhu H , Song L , White J , Yuan X , Clifton SW , Roe BA , McLaughlin R
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :4658 , 2001
Abstract : The 1,852,442-bp sequence of an M1 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes, a Gram-positive pathogen, has been determined and contains 1,752 predicted protein-encoding genes. Approximately one-third of these genes have no identifiable function, with the remainder falling into previously characterized categories of known microbial function. Consistent with the observation that S. pyogenes is responsible for a wider variety of human disease than any other bacterial species, more than 40 putative virulence-associated genes have been identified. Additional genes have been identified that encode proteins likely associated with microbial "molecular mimicry" of host characteristics and involved in rheumatic fever or acute glomerulonephritis. The complete or partial sequence of four different bacteriophage genomes is also present, with each containing genes for one or more previously undiscovered superantigen-like proteins. These prophage-associated genes encode at least six potential virulence factors, emphasizing the importance of bacteriophages in horizontal gene transfer and a possible mechanism for generating new strains with increased pathogenic potential.
ESTHER : Ferretti_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4658
PubMedSearch : Ferretti_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4658
PubMedID: 11296296
Gene_locus related to this paper: strpy-ESTA , strpy-PEPXP , strpy-Q8K5W4 , strpy-SPY1308 , strpy-SPYM18.1727

Title : The DNA sequence of human chromosome 22 - Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
Author(s) : Dunham I , Hunt AR , Collins JE , Bruskiewich R , Beare DM , Clamp M , Smink LJ , Ainscough R , Almeida JP , Babbage AK , Bagguley C , Bailey J , Barlow KF , Bates KN , Beasley OP , Bird CP , Blakey SE , Bridgeman AM , Buck D , Burgess J , Burrill WD , Burton J , Carder C , Carter NP , Chen Y , Clark G , Clegg SM , Cobley VE , Cole CG , Collier RE , Connor R , Conroy D , Corby NR , Coville GJ , Cox AV , Davis J , Dawson E , Dhami PD , Dockree C , Dodsworth SJ , Durbin RM , Ellington AG , Evans KL , Fey JM , Fleming K , French L , Garner AA , Gilbert JGR , Goward ME , Grafham DV , Griffiths MND , Hall C , Hall RE , Hall-Tamlyn G , Heathcott RW , Ho S , Holmes S , Hunt SE , Jones MC , Kershaw J , Kimberley AM , King A , Laird GK , Langford CF , Leversha MA , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Martyn ID , Mashreghi-Mohammadi M , Matthews LH , Mccann OT , Mcclay J , Mclaren S , McMurray AA , Milne SA , Mortimore BJ , Odell CN , Pavitt R , Pearce AV , Pearson D , Phillimore BJCT , Phillips SH , Plumb RW , Ramsay H , Ramsey Y , Rogers L , Ross MT , Scott CE , Sehra HK , Skuce CD , Smalley S , Smith ML , Soderlund C , Spragon L , Steward CA , Sulston JE , Swann RM , Vaudin M , Wall M , Wallis JM , Whiteley MN , Willey DL , Williams L , Williams SA , Williamson H , Wilmer TE , Wilming L , Wright CL , Hubbard T , Bentley DR , Beck S , Rogers J , Shimizu N , Minoshima S , Kawasaki K , Sasaki T , Asakawa S , Kudoh J , Shintani A , Shibuya K , Yoshizaki Y , Aoki N , Mitsuyama S , Roe BA , Chen F , Chu L , Crabtree J , Deschamps S , Do A , Do T , Dorman A , Fang F , Fu Y , Hu P , Hua A , Kenton S , Lai H , Lao HI , Lewis J , Lewis S , Lin S-P , Loh P , Malaj E , Nguyen T , Pan H , Phan S , Qi S , Qian Y , Ray L , Ren Q , Shaull S , Sloan D , Song L , Wang Q , Wang Y , Wang Z , White J , Willingham D , Wu H , Yao Z , Zhan M , Zhang G , Chissoe S , Murray J , Miller N , Minx P , Fulton R , Johnson D , Bemis G , Bentley D , Bradshaw H , Bourne S , Cordes M , Du Z , Fulton L , Goela D , Graves T , Hawkins J , Hinds K , Kemp K , Latreille P , Layman D , Ozersky P , Rohlfing T , Scheet P , Walker C , Wamsley A , Wohldmann P , Pepin K , Nelson J , Korf I , Bedell JA , Hillier L , Mardis E , Waterston R , Wilson R , Emanuel BS , Shaikh T , Kurahashi H , Saitta S , Budarf ML , McDermid HE , Johnson A , Wong ACC , Morrow BE , Edelmann L , Kim UJ , Shizuya H , Simon MI , Dumanski JP , Peyrard M , Kedra D , Seroussi E , Fransson I , Tapia I , Bruder CE , O'Brien KP
Ref : Nature , 402 :489 , 1999
Abstract : Knowledge of the complete genomic DNA sequence of an organism allows a systematic approach to defining its genetic components. The genomic sequence provides access to the complete structures of all genes, including those without known function, their control elements, and, by inference, the proteins they encode, as well as all other biologically important sequences. Furthermore, the sequence is a rich and permanent source of information for the design of further biological studies of the organism and for the study of evolution through cross-species sequence comparison. The power of this approach has been amply demonstrated by the determination of the sequences of a number of microbial and model organisms. The next step is to obtain the complete sequence of the entire human genome. Here we report the sequence of the euchromatic part of human chromosome 22. The sequence obtained consists of 12 contiguous segments spanning 33.4 megabases, contains at least 545 genes and 134 pseudogenes, and provides the first view of the complex chromosomal landscapes that will be found in the rest of the genome.
ESTHER : Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
PubMedSearch : Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
PubMedID: 10591208
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-CES5A , human-SERHL2