Pearson D

References (5)

Title : Long-term effects of BIBN-99, a selective muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist, on improving spatial memory performance in aged cognitively impaired rats - Rowe_2003_Behav.Brain.Res_145_171
Author(s) : Rowe WB , O'Donnell JP , Pearson D , Rose GM , Meaney MJ , Quirion R
Ref : Behavioural Brain Research , 145 :171 , 2003
Abstract : Aged Long-Evans rats were screened for spatial memory deficits using the Morris water maze task. Rats found to have impaired performance on the task (aged-impaired, AI) were then treated with a selective muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist, 5,11-dihydro-8-chloro-11-[[4-[3-[(2,2-dimethyl-1-oxopentyl)ethylamino]propyl]-1-p iperidinyl]acetyl]-6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one (BIBN-99; 0.5 mg/kg, s.c.), for 3 successive days while receiving additional water maze training. BIBN-99 significantly improved performance in the task during the 3 days of drug treatment. Treatment was then ceased for the remainder of the study and rats were tested again in the water maze on days 10, 17, and 24. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, enhanced performance was observed in the AI rats that had previously been treated with BIBN-99. These results indicate that BIBN-99 enhances spatial learning in AI animals and that enhanced (or long-term) memory persists in the absence of the drug. In a second experiment, a 2-month delay was imposed in between the original water maze screening and the drug treatment regime. Again, BIBN-99 significantly improved performance in AI rats. This latter study suggests that reference memory does not decay, even in an AI animal that had displayed poor learning following original water maze screening. Together, these studies help provide further insight into possible mechanism(s) of reference memory and its potential clinical usefulness.
ESTHER : Rowe_2003_Behav.Brain.Res_145_171
PubMedSearch : Rowe_2003_Behav.Brain.Res_145_171
PubMedID: 14529815

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : The DNA sequence of human chromosome 22 - Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
Author(s) : Dunham I , Hunt AR , Collins JE , Bruskiewich R , Beare DM , Clamp M , Smink LJ , Ainscough R , Almeida JP , Babbage AK , Bagguley C , Bailey J , Barlow KF , Bates KN , Beasley OP , Bird CP , Blakey SE , Bridgeman AM , Buck D , Burgess J , Burrill WD , Burton J , Carder C , Carter NP , Chen Y , Clark G , Clegg SM , Cobley VE , Cole CG , Collier RE , Connor R , Conroy D , Corby NR , Coville GJ , Cox AV , Davis J , Dawson E , Dhami PD , Dockree C , Dodsworth SJ , Durbin RM , Ellington AG , Evans KL , Fey JM , Fleming K , French L , Garner AA , Gilbert JGR , Goward ME , Grafham DV , Griffiths MND , Hall C , Hall RE , Hall-Tamlyn G , Heathcott RW , Ho S , Holmes S , Hunt SE , Jones MC , Kershaw J , Kimberley AM , King A , Laird GK , Langford CF , Leversha MA , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Martyn ID , Mashreghi-Mohammadi M , Matthews LH , Mccann OT , Mcclay J , Mclaren S , McMurray AA , Milne SA , Mortimore BJ , Odell CN , Pavitt R , Pearce AV , Pearson D , Phillimore BJCT , Phillips SH , Plumb RW , Ramsay H , Ramsey Y , Rogers L , Ross MT , Scott CE , Sehra HK , Skuce CD , Smalley S , Smith ML , Soderlund C , Spragon L , Steward CA , Sulston JE , Swann RM , Vaudin M , Wall M , Wallis JM , Whiteley MN , Willey DL , Williams L , Williams SA , Williamson H , Wilmer TE , Wilming L , Wright CL , Hubbard T , Bentley DR , Beck S , Rogers J , Shimizu N , Minoshima S , Kawasaki K , Sasaki T , Asakawa S , Kudoh J , Shintani A , Shibuya K , Yoshizaki Y , Aoki N , Mitsuyama S , Roe BA , Chen F , Chu L , Crabtree J , Deschamps S , Do A , Do T , Dorman A , Fang F , Fu Y , Hu P , Hua A , Kenton S , Lai H , Lao HI , Lewis J , Lewis S , Lin S-P , Loh P , Malaj E , Nguyen T , Pan H , Phan S , Qi S , Qian Y , Ray L , Ren Q , Shaull S , Sloan D , Song L , Wang Q , Wang Y , Wang Z , White J , Willingham D , Wu H , Yao Z , Zhan M , Zhang G , Chissoe S , Murray J , Miller N , Minx P , Fulton R , Johnson D , Bemis G , Bentley D , Bradshaw H , Bourne S , Cordes M , Du Z , Fulton L , Goela D , Graves T , Hawkins J , Hinds K , Kemp K , Latreille P , Layman D , Ozersky P , Rohlfing T , Scheet P , Walker C , Wamsley A , Wohldmann P , Pepin K , Nelson J , Korf I , Bedell JA , Hillier L , Mardis E , Waterston R , Wilson R , Emanuel BS , Shaikh T , Kurahashi H , Saitta S , Budarf ML , McDermid HE , Johnson A , Wong ACC , Morrow BE , Edelmann L , Kim UJ , Shizuya H , Simon MI , Dumanski JP , Peyrard M , Kedra D , Seroussi E , Fransson I , Tapia I , Bruder CE , O'Brien KP
Ref : Nature , 402 :489 , 1999
Abstract : Knowledge of the complete genomic DNA sequence of an organism allows a systematic approach to defining its genetic components. The genomic sequence provides access to the complete structures of all genes, including those without known function, their control elements, and, by inference, the proteins they encode, as well as all other biologically important sequences. Furthermore, the sequence is a rich and permanent source of information for the design of further biological studies of the organism and for the study of evolution through cross-species sequence comparison. The power of this approach has been amply demonstrated by the determination of the sequences of a number of microbial and model organisms. The next step is to obtain the complete sequence of the entire human genome. Here we report the sequence of the euchromatic part of human chromosome 22. The sequence obtained consists of 12 contiguous segments spanning 33.4 megabases, contains at least 545 genes and 134 pseudogenes, and provides the first view of the complex chromosomal landscapes that will be found in the rest of the genome.
ESTHER : Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
PubMedSearch : Dunham_1999_Nature_402_489
PubMedID: 10591208
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-CES5A , human-SERHL2

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XIII - Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
Author(s) : Bowman S , Churcher C , Badcock K , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Dedman K , Devlin K , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Hunt S , Jagels K , Lye G , Moule S , Odell C , Pearson D , Rajandream M , Rice P , Skelton J , Walsh S , Whitehead S , Barrell B
Ref : Nature , 387 :90 , 1997
Abstract : Systematic sequencing of the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has revealed thousands of new predicted genes and allowed analysis of long-range features of chromosomal organization. Generally, genes and predicted genes seem to be distributed evenly throughout the genome, having no overall preference for DNA strand. Apart from the smaller chromosomes, which can have substantially lower gene density in their telomeric regions, there is a consistent average of one open reading frame (ORF) approximately every two kilobases. However, one of the most surprising findings for a eukaryote with approximately 6,000 genes was the amount of apparent redundancy in its genome. This redundancy occurs both between individual ORFs and over more extensive chromosome regions, which have been duplicated preserving gene order and orientation. Here we report the entire nucleotide sequence of chromosome XIII, the sixth-largest S. cerevisiae chromosome, and demonstrate that its features and organization are consistent with those observed for other S. cerevisiae chromosomes. Analysis revealed 459 ORFs, 284 have not been identified previously. Both intra- and interchromosomal duplications of regions of this chromosome have occurred.
ESTHER : Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
PubMedSearch : Bowman_1997_Nature_387_90
PubMedID: 9169872
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-FSH2 , yeast-ym60 , yeast-ymc0

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XVI - Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
Author(s) : Bussey H , Storms RK , Ahmed A , Albermann K , Allen E , Ansorge W , Araujo R , Aparicio A , Barrell B , Badcock K , Benes V , Botstein D , Bowman S , Bruckner M , Carpenter J , Cherry JM , Chung E , Churcher C , Coster F , Davis K , Davis RW , Dietrich FS , Delius H , DiPaolo T , Dubois E , Dusterhoft A , Duncan M , Floeth M , Fortin N , Friesen JD , Fritz C , Goffeau A , Hall J , Hebling U , Heumann K , Hilbert H , Hillier L , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Johnston M , Kalman S , Kleine K , Komp C , Kurdi O , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin A , Lin D , Louis EJ , Marathe R , Messenguy F , Mewes HW , Mirtipati S , Moestl D , Muller-Auer S , Namath A , Nentwich U , Oefner P , Pearson D , Petel FX , Pohl TM , Purnelle B , Rajandream MA , Rechmann S , Rieger M , Riles L , Roberts D , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Scherens B , Schramm S , Schroder M , Sdicu AM , Tettelin H , Urrestarazu LA , Ushinsky S , Vierendeels F , Vissers S , Voss H , Walsh SV , Wambutt R , Wang Y , Wedler E , Wedler H , Winnett E , Zhong WW , Zollner A , Vo DH , Hani J
Ref : Nature , 387 :103 , 1997
Abstract : The nucleotide sequence of the 948,061 base pairs of chromosome XVI has been determined, completing the sequence of the yeast genome. Chromosome XVI was the last yeast chromosome identified, and some of the genes mapped early to it, such as GAL4, PEP4 and RAD1 (ref. 2) have played important roles in the development of yeast biology. The architecture of this final chromosome seems to be typical of the large yeast chromosomes, and shows large duplications with other yeast chromosomes. Chromosome XVI contains 487 potential protein-encoding genes, 17 tRNA genes and two small nuclear RNA genes; 27% of the genes have significant similarities to human gene products, and 48% are new and of unknown biological function. Systematic efforts to explore gene function have begun.
ESTHER : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedSearch : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedID: 9169875
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-MCFS1 , yeast-YPR147C