Sanders S

References (4)

Title : Genome evolution of Wolbachia strain wPip from the Culex pipiens group - Klasson_2008_Mol.Biol.Evol_25_1877
Author(s) : Klasson L , Walker T , Sebaihia M , Sanders MJ , Quail MA , Lord A , Sanders S , Earl J , O'Neill SL , Thomson N , Sinkins SP , Parkhill J
Ref : Molecular Biology Evolution , 25 :1877 , 2008
Abstract : The obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis strain wPip induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), patterns of crossing sterility, in the Culex pipiens group of mosquitoes. The complete sequence is presented of the 1.48-Mbp genome of wPip which encodes 1386 coding sequences (CDSs), representing the first genome sequence of a B-supergroup Wolbachia. Comparisons were made with the smaller genomes of Wolbachia strains wMel of Drosophila melanogaster, an A-supergroup Wolbachia that is also a CI inducer, and wBm, a mutualist of Brugia malayi nematodes that belongs to the D-supergroup of Wolbachia. Despite extensive gene order rearrangement, a core set of Wolbachia genes shared between the 3 genomes can be identified and contrasts with a flexible gene pool where rapid evolution has taken place. There are much more extensive prophage and ankyrin repeat encoding (ANK) gene components of the wPip genome compared with wMel and wBm, and both are likely to be of considerable importance in wPip biology. Five WO-B-like prophage regions are present and contain some genes that are identical or highly similar in multiple prophage copies, whereas other genes are unique, and it is likely that extensive recombination, duplication, and insertion have occurred between copies. A much larger number of genes encode ankyrin repeat (ANK) proteins in wPip, with 60 present compared with 23 in wMel, many of which are within or close to the prophage regions. It is likely that this pattern is partly a result of expansions in the wPip lineage, due for example to gene duplication, but their presence is in some cases more ancient. The wPip genome underlines the considerable evolutionary flexibility of Wolbachia, providing clear evidence for the rapid evolution of ANK-encoding genes and of prophage regions. This host-Wolbachia system, with its complex patterns of sterility induced between populations, now provides an excellent model for unraveling the molecular systems underlying host reproductive manipulation.
ESTHER : Klasson_2008_Mol.Biol.Evol_25_1877
PubMedSearch : Klasson_2008_Mol.Biol.Evol_25_1877
PubMedID: 18550617

Title : The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi - Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
Author(s) : Pain A , Bohme U , Berry AE , Mungall K , Finn RD , Jackson AP , Mourier T , Mistry J , Pasini EM , Aslett MA , Balasubrammaniam S , Borgwardt K , Brooks K , Carret C , Carver TJ , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Clark TG , Galinski MR , Hall N , Harper D , Harris D , Hauser H , Ivens A , Janssen CS , Keane T , Larke N , Lapp S , Marti M , Moule S , Meyer IM , Ormond D , Peters N , Sanders M , Sanders S , Sargeant TJ , Simmonds M , Smith F , Squares R , Thurston S , Tivey AR , Walker D , White B , Zuiderwijk E , Churcher C , Quail MA , Cowman AF , Turner CM , Rajandream MA , Kocken CH , Thomas AW , Newbold CI , Barrell BG , Berriman M
Ref : Nature , 455 :799 , 2008
Abstract : Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described, and it provides an opportunity for comparison with the recently completed P. vivax genome and other sequenced Plasmodium genomes. In contrast to other Plasmodium genomes, putative variant antigen families are dispersed throughout the genome and are associated with intrachromosomal telomere repeats. One of these families, the KIRs, contains sequences that collectively match over one-half of the host CD99 extracellular domain, which may represent an unusual form of molecular mimicry.
ESTHER : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedSearch : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedID: 18843368
Gene_locus related to this paper: plakh-b3kz42 , plakh-b3kz45 , plakh-b3l0y4 , plakh-b3l1r3 , plakh-b3l8u5 , plakh-b3l336 , plakh-b3l571 , plakh-b3la01 , plakh-b3lb44

Title : The genome sequence of the fish pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida strain LFI1238 shows extensive evidence of gene decay - Hjerde_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_616
Author(s) : Hjerde E , Lorentzen MS , Holden MT , Seeger K , Paulsen S , Bason N , Churcher C , Harris D , Norbertczak H , Quail MA , Sanders S , Thurston S , Parkhill J , Willassen NP , Thomson NR
Ref : BMC Genomics , 9 :616 , 2008
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The fish pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida is the causative agent of cold-water vibriosis in marine aquaculture. The Gram-negative bacterium causes tissue degradation, hemolysis and sepsis in vivo.
RESULTS: In total, 4 286 protein coding sequences were identified, and the 4.6 Mb genome of A. salmonicida has a six partite architecture with two chromosomes and four plasmids. Sequence analysis revealed a highly fragmented genome structure caused by the insertion of an extensive number of insertion sequence (IS) elements. The IS elements can be related to important evolutionary events such as gene acquisition, gene loss and chromosomal rearrangements. New A. salmonicida functional capabilities that may have been aquired through horizontal DNA transfer include genes involved in iron-acquisition, and protein secretion and play potential roles in pathogenicity. On the other hand, the degeneration of 370 genes and consequent loss of specific functions suggest that A. salmonicida has a reduced metabolic and physiological capacity in comparison to related Vibrionaceae species. CONCLUSION: Most prominent is the loss of several genes involved in the utilisation of the polysaccharide chitin. In particular, the disruption of three extracellular chitinases responsible for enzymatic breakdown of chitin makes A. salmonicida unable to grow on the polymer form of chitin. These, and other losses could restrict the variety of carrier organisms A. salmonicida can attach to, and associate with. Gene acquisition and gene loss may be related to the emergence of A. salmonicida as a fish pathogen.
ESTHER : Hjerde_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_616
PubMedSearch : Hjerde_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_616
PubMedID: 19099551
Gene_locus related to this paper: alisl-b6elz2 , alisl-b6ek45

Title : Effect of carbon tetrachloride liver damage in the rabbit and rat on acetylcholine esterase activity -
Author(s) : Ellis S , Sanders S , Bodansky O
Ref : Journal of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics , 91 :255 , 1947
PubMedID: 20270131