Ivens A

References (6)

Title : The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni - Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
Author(s) : Berriman M , Haas BJ , LoVerde PT , Wilson RA , Dillon GP , Cerqueira GC , Mashiyama ST , Al-Lazikani B , Andrade LF , Ashton PD , Aslett MA , Bartholomeu DC , Blandin G , Caffrey CR , Coghlan A , Coulson R , Day TA , Delcher A , DeMarco R , Djikeng A , Eyre T , Gamble JA , Ghedin E , Gu Y , Hertz-Fowler C , Hirai H , Hirai Y , Houston R , Ivens A , Johnston DA , Lacerda D , Macedo CD , McVeigh P , Ning Z , Oliveira G , Overington JP , Parkhill J , Pertea M , Pierce RJ , Protasio AV , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Sajid M , Salzberg SL , Stanke M , Tivey AR , White O , Williams DL , Wortman J , Wu W , Zamanian M , Zerlotini A , Fraser-Liggett CM , Barrell BG , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Nature , 460 :352 , 2009
Abstract : Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. Here we present analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and new families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternative splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the Lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, and the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and new targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints, and a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease.
ESTHER : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedID: 19606141
Gene_locus related to this paper: schma-ACHE1 , schma-ACHE2 , schma-c4qb79 , schma-c4qmk4 , schma-g4v9h7 , schma-BCHE , schma-g4vmf3

Title : Genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by phagocytosis or growth on bacteria in Dictyostelium - Sillo_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_291
Author(s) : Sillo A , Bloomfield G , Balest A , Balbo A , Pergolizzi B , Peracino B , Skelton J , Ivens A , Bozzaro S
Ref : BMC Genomics , 9 :291 , 2008
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Phagocytosis plays a major role in the defense of higher organisms against microbial infection and provides also the basis for antigen processing in the immune response. Cells of the model organism Dictyostelium are professional phagocytes that exploit phagocytosis of bacteria as the preferred way to ingest food, besides killing pathogens. We have investigated Dictyostelium differential gene expression during phagocytosis of non-pathogenic bacteria, using DNA microarrays, in order to identify molecular functions and novel genes involved in phagocytosis.
RESULTS: The gene expression profiles of cells incubated for a brief time with bacteria were compared with cells either incubated in axenic medium or growing on bacteria. Transcriptional changes during exponential growth in axenic medium or on bacteria were also compared. We recognized 443 and 59 genes that are differentially regulated by phagocytosis or by the different growth conditions (growth on bacteria vs. axenic medium), respectively, and 102 genes regulated by both processes. Roughly one third of the genes are up-regulated compared to macropinocytosis and axenic growth. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes with different tools revealed that phagocytosis induces profound changes in carbohydrate, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and in cytoskeletal components. Genes regulating translation and mitochondrial biogenesis are mostly up-regulated. Genes involved in sterol biosynthesis are selectively up-regulated, suggesting a shift in membrane lipid composition linked to phagocytosis. Very few changes were detected in genes required for vesicle fission/fusion, indicating that the intracellular traffic machinery is mostly in common between phagocytosis and macropinocytosis. A few putative receptors, including GPCR family 3 proteins, scaffolding and adhesion proteins, components of signal transduction and transcription factors have been identified, which could be part of a signalling complex regulating phagocytosis and adaptational downstream responses. CONCLUSION: The results highlight differences between phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, and provide the basis for targeted functional analysis of new candidate genes and for comparison studies with transcriptomes during infection with pathogenic bacteria.
ESTHER : Sillo_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_291
PubMedSearch : Sillo_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_291
PubMedID: 18559084
Gene_locus related to this paper: dicdi-apra

Title : The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi - Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
Author(s) : Pain A , Bohme U , Berry AE , Mungall K , Finn RD , Jackson AP , Mourier T , Mistry J , Pasini EM , Aslett MA , Balasubrammaniam S , Borgwardt K , Brooks K , Carret C , Carver TJ , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Clark TG , Galinski MR , Hall N , Harper D , Harris D , Hauser H , Ivens A , Janssen CS , Keane T , Larke N , Lapp S , Marti M , Moule S , Meyer IM , Ormond D , Peters N , Sanders M , Sanders S , Sargeant TJ , Simmonds M , Smith F , Squares R , Thurston S , Tivey AR , Walker D , White B , Zuiderwijk E , Churcher C , Quail MA , Cowman AF , Turner CM , Rajandream MA , Kocken CH , Thomas AW , Newbold CI , Barrell BG , Berriman M
Ref : Nature , 455 :799 , 2008
Abstract : Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described, and it provides an opportunity for comparison with the recently completed P. vivax genome and other sequenced Plasmodium genomes. In contrast to other Plasmodium genomes, putative variant antigen families are dispersed throughout the genome and are associated with intrachromosomal telomere repeats. One of these families, the KIRs, contains sequences that collectively match over one-half of the host CD99 extracellular domain, which may represent an unusual form of molecular mimicry.
ESTHER : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedSearch : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedID: 18843368
Gene_locus related to this paper: plakh-b3kz42 , plakh-b3kz45 , plakh-b3l0y4 , plakh-b3l1r3 , plakh-b3l8u5 , plakh-b3l336 , plakh-b3l571 , plakh-b3la01 , plakh-b3lb44

Title : Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes - Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
Author(s) : Sebaihia M , Peck MW , Minton NP , Thomson NR , Holden MT , Mitchell WJ , Carter AT , Bentley SD , Mason DR , Crossman L , Paul CJ , Ivens A , Wells-Bennik MH , Davis IJ , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Churcher C , Quail MA , Chillingworth T , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Jagels K , Larke N , Maddison M , Moule S , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Rabbinowitsch E , Sanders M , Simmonds M , White B , Whithead S , Parkhill J
Ref : Genome Res , 17 :1082 , 2007
Abstract : Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues.
ESTHER : Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
PubMedSearch : Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
PubMedID: 17519437
Gene_locus related to this paper: clobh-A5I3I2 , clobh-A51055 , clob1-a7fqm2 , clob1-a7fv94 , clobl-a7gbn0 , clobh-pip , clobh-a5i3m0

Title : Comparative genomic analysis of three Leishmania species that cause diverse human disease - Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
Author(s) : Peacock CS , Seeger K , Harris D , Murphy L , Ruiz JC , Quail MA , Peters N , Adlem E , Tivey A , Aslett M , Kerhornou A , Ivens A , Fraser A , Rajandream MA , Carver T , Norbertczak H , Chillingworth T , Hance Z , Jagels K , Moule S , Ormond D , Rutter S , Squares R , Whitehead S , Rabbinowitsch E , Arrowsmith C , White B , Thurston S , Bringaud F , Baldauf SL , Faulconbridge A , Jeffares D , Depledge DP , Oyola SO , Hilley JD , Brito LO , Tosi LR , Barrell B , Cruz AK , Mottram JC , Smith DF , Berriman M
Ref : Nat Genet , 39 :839 , 2007
Abstract : Leishmania parasites cause a broad spectrum of clinical disease. Here we report the sequencing of the genomes of two species of Leishmania: Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis. The comparison of these sequences with the published genome of Leishmania major reveals marked conservation of synteny and identifies only approximately 200 genes with a differential distribution between the three species. L. braziliensis, contrary to Leishmania species examined so far, possesses components of a putative RNA-mediated interference pathway, telomere-associated transposable elements and spliced leader-associated SLACS retrotransposons. We show that pseudogene formation and gene loss are the principal forces shaping the different genomes. Genes that are differentially distributed between the species encode proteins implicated in host-pathogen interactions and parasite survival in the macrophage.
ESTHER : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedSearch : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedID: 17572675
Gene_locus related to this paper: leibr-a4h6l0 , leibr-a4h6l1 , leibr-a4h9b6 , leibr-a4h908 , leibr-a4h956 , leibr-a4h959 , leibr-a4h960 , leibr-a4hen1 , leibr-a4hf07 , leibr-a4hgl0 , leibr-a4hhu6 , leibr-a4hj94 , leibr-a4hk72 , leibr-a4hpa8 , leibr-a4hpz5 , leiin-a4huz4 , leiin-a4hxe0 , leiin-a4hxh8 , leiin-a4hxi1 , leiin-a4hxn7 , leiin-a4hyv9 , leiin-a4i1v9 , leiin-a4i4z6 , leiin-a4i6n9 , leiin-a4i7q7 , leiin-a4idl6 , leima-e9ady6 , leima-OPB , leima-q4q0t5 , leima-q4q8a8 , leima-q4q398 , leima-q4q942 , leima-q4qe85 , leima-q4qe86 , leima-q4qj45

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2