Rajandream MA

References (24)

Title : Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogens Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans - Jackson_2009_Genome.Res_19_2231
Author(s) : Jackson AP , Gamble JA , Yeomans T , Moran GP , Saunders D , Harris D , Aslett M , Barrell JF , Butler G , Citiulo F , Coleman DC , de Groot PW , Goodwin TJ , Quail MA , McQuillan J , Munro CA , Pain A , Poulter RT , Rajandream MA , Renauld H , Spiering MJ , Tivey A , Gow NA , Barrell B , Sullivan DJ , Berriman M
Ref : Genome Res , 19 :2231 , 2009
Abstract : Candida dubliniensis is the closest known relative of Candida albicans, the most pathogenic yeast species in humans. However, despite both species sharing many phenotypic characteristics, including the ability to form true hyphae, C. dubliniensis is a significantly less virulent and less versatile pathogen. Therefore, to identify C. albicans-specific genes that may be responsible for an increased capacity to cause disease, we have sequenced the C. dubliniensis genome and compared it with the known C. albicans genome sequence. Although the two genome sequences are highly similar and synteny is conserved throughout, 168 species-specific genes are identified, including some encoding known hyphal-specific virulence factors, such as the aspartyl proteinases Sap4 and Sap5 and the proposed invasin Als3. Among the 115 pseudogenes confirmed in C. dubliniensis are orthologs of several filamentous growth regulator (FGR) genes that also have suspected roles in pathogenesis. However, the principal differences in genomic repertoire concern expansion of the TLO gene family of putative transcription factors and the IFA family of putative transmembrane proteins in C. albicans, which represent novel candidate virulence-associated factors. The results suggest that the recent evolutionary histories of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are quite different. While gene families instrumental in pathogenesis have been elaborated in C. albicans, C. dubliniensis has lost genomic capacity and key pathogenic functions. This could explain why C. albicans is a more potent pathogen in humans than C. dubliniensis.
ESTHER : Jackson_2009_Genome.Res_19_2231
PubMedSearch : Jackson_2009_Genome.Res_19_2231
PubMedID: 19745113
Gene_locus related to this paper: canal-ATG15 , canal-c4yl13 , canal-ppme1 , canal-q5a0c9 , canal-q5ad17 , canal-q5ady2 , canal-q5ag57 , canal-q5ai12 , canal-q5akz5 , canal-q5apu4 , canal-q59m48 , canal-q59nw6 , candc-b9w8x6 , candc-b9w8x7 , candc-b9w905 , candc-b9wa64 , candc-b9wc27 , candc-b9wc30 , candc-b9wc93 , candc-b9wce3 , candc-b9wdh9 , candc-b9wds3 , candc-b9whs3 , candc-b9whs6 , candc-b9whv2 , candc-b9wi60 , candc-b9wid3 , candc-b9wje5 , candc-b9wk97 , candc-CduLAc , candc-b9wkf5 , candc-b9wkj1 , candc-b9wlf0 , candc-b9wmt8 , candc-b9wmx4 , candc-b9wc51 , candc-b9wa43 , candc-b9wl19 , candc-kex1

Title : The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni - Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
Author(s) : Berriman M , Haas BJ , LoVerde PT , Wilson RA , Dillon GP , Cerqueira GC , Mashiyama ST , Al-Lazikani B , Andrade LF , Ashton PD , Aslett MA , Bartholomeu DC , Blandin G , Caffrey CR , Coghlan A , Coulson R , Day TA , Delcher A , DeMarco R , Djikeng A , Eyre T , Gamble JA , Ghedin E , Gu Y , Hertz-Fowler C , Hirai H , Hirai Y , Houston R , Ivens A , Johnston DA , Lacerda D , Macedo CD , McVeigh P , Ning Z , Oliveira G , Overington JP , Parkhill J , Pertea M , Pierce RJ , Protasio AV , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Sajid M , Salzberg SL , Stanke M , Tivey AR , White O , Williams DL , Wortman J , Wu W , Zamanian M , Zerlotini A , Fraser-Liggett CM , Barrell BG , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Nature , 460 :352 , 2009
Abstract : Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. Here we present analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and new families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternative splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the Lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, and the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and new targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints, and a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease.
ESTHER : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedID: 19606141
Gene_locus related to this paper: schma-ACHE1 , schma-ACHE2 , schma-c4qb79 , schma-c4qmk4 , schma-g4v9h7 , schma-BCHE , schma-g4vmf3

Title : The complete genome, comparative and functional analysis of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia reveals an organism heavily shielded by drug resistance determinants - Crossman_2008_Genome.Biol_9_R74
Author(s) : Crossman LC , Gould VC , Dow JM , Vernikos GS , Okazaki A , Sebaihia M , Saunders D , Arrowsmith C , Carver T , Peters N , Adlem E , Kerhornou A , Lord A , Murphy L , Seeger K , Squares R , Rutter S , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Harris D , Churcher C , Bentley SD , Parkhill J , Thomson NR , Avison MB
Ref : Genome Biol , 9 :R74 , 2008
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a nosocomial opportunistic pathogen of the Xanthomonadaceae. The organism has been isolated from both clinical and soil environments in addition to the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients and the immunocompromised. Whilst relatively distant phylogenetically, the closest sequenced relatives of S. maltophilia are the plant pathogenic xanthomonads. RESULTS: The genome of the bacteremia-associated isolate S. maltophilia K279a is 4,851,126 bp and of high G+C content. The sequence reveals an organism with a remarkable capacity for drug and heavy metal resistance. In addition to a number of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobial drugs of different classes via alternative mechanisms, nine resistance-nodulation-division (RND)-type putative antimicrobial efflux systems are present. Functional genomic analysis confirms a role in drug resistance for several of the novel RND efflux pumps. S. maltophilia possesses potentially mobile regions of DNA and encodes a number of pili and fimbriae likely to be involved in adhesion and biofilm formation that may also contribute to increased antimicrobial drug resistance. CONCLUSION: The panoply of antimicrobial drug resistance genes and mobile genetic elements found suggests that the organism can act as a reservoir of antimicrobial drug resistance determinants in a clinical environment, which is an issue of considerable concern.
ESTHER : Crossman_2008_Genome.Biol_9_R74
PubMedSearch : Crossman_2008_Genome.Biol_9_R74
PubMedID: 18419807
Gene_locus related to this paper: strm5-b4sjf3 , strm5-b4sly1 , strm5-b4smq6 , strm5-b4st20 , strm5-bioh , strmk-b2fhb1 , strmk-b2fju9 , strmk-b2fkx8 , strmk-b2fl50 , strmk-b2fl54 , strmk-b2flj0 , strmk-b2fnc5 , strmk-b2fre3 , strmk-b2frm1 , strmk-b2frs0 , strmk-b2fsp0 , strmk-b2ftw9 , strmk-b2fuf3 , strmk-metx , xanma-P95782 , strmk-b2fmj5 , strmk-b2fpy9 , strmk-b2ftk7 , strmk-b2frv5

Title : The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi - Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
Author(s) : Pain A , Bohme U , Berry AE , Mungall K , Finn RD , Jackson AP , Mourier T , Mistry J , Pasini EM , Aslett MA , Balasubrammaniam S , Borgwardt K , Brooks K , Carret C , Carver TJ , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Clark TG , Galinski MR , Hall N , Harper D , Harris D , Hauser H , Ivens A , Janssen CS , Keane T , Larke N , Lapp S , Marti M , Moule S , Meyer IM , Ormond D , Peters N , Sanders M , Sanders S , Sargeant TJ , Simmonds M , Smith F , Squares R , Thurston S , Tivey AR , Walker D , White B , Zuiderwijk E , Churcher C , Quail MA , Cowman AF , Turner CM , Rajandream MA , Kocken CH , Thomas AW , Newbold CI , Barrell BG , Berriman M
Ref : Nature , 455 :799 , 2008
Abstract : Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described, and it provides an opportunity for comparison with the recently completed P. vivax genome and other sequenced Plasmodium genomes. In contrast to other Plasmodium genomes, putative variant antigen families are dispersed throughout the genome and are associated with intrachromosomal telomere repeats. One of these families, the KIRs, contains sequences that collectively match over one-half of the host CD99 extracellular domain, which may represent an unusual form of molecular mimicry.
ESTHER : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedSearch : Pain_2008_Nature_455_799
PubMedID: 18843368
Gene_locus related to this paper: plakh-b3kz42 , plakh-b3kz45 , plakh-b3l0y4 , plakh-b3l1r3 , plakh-b3l8u5 , plakh-b3l336 , plakh-b3l571 , plakh-b3la01 , plakh-b3lb44

Title : Comparative genomic analysis of three Leishmania species that cause diverse human disease - Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
Author(s) : Peacock CS , Seeger K , Harris D , Murphy L , Ruiz JC , Quail MA , Peters N , Adlem E , Tivey A , Aslett M , Kerhornou A , Ivens A , Fraser A , Rajandream MA , Carver T , Norbertczak H , Chillingworth T , Hance Z , Jagels K , Moule S , Ormond D , Rutter S , Squares R , Whitehead S , Rabbinowitsch E , Arrowsmith C , White B , Thurston S , Bringaud F , Baldauf SL , Faulconbridge A , Jeffares D , Depledge DP , Oyola SO , Hilley JD , Brito LO , Tosi LR , Barrell B , Cruz AK , Mottram JC , Smith DF , Berriman M
Ref : Nat Genet , 39 :839 , 2007
Abstract : Leishmania parasites cause a broad spectrum of clinical disease. Here we report the sequencing of the genomes of two species of Leishmania: Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis. The comparison of these sequences with the published genome of Leishmania major reveals marked conservation of synteny and identifies only approximately 200 genes with a differential distribution between the three species. L. braziliensis, contrary to Leishmania species examined so far, possesses components of a putative RNA-mediated interference pathway, telomere-associated transposable elements and spliced leader-associated SLACS retrotransposons. We show that pseudogene formation and gene loss are the principal forces shaping the different genomes. Genes that are differentially distributed between the species encode proteins implicated in host-pathogen interactions and parasite survival in the macrophage.
ESTHER : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedSearch : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedID: 17572675
Gene_locus related to this paper: leibr-a4h6l0 , leibr-a4h6l1 , leibr-a4h9b6 , leibr-a4h908 , leibr-a4h956 , leibr-a4h959 , leibr-a4h960 , leibr-a4hen1 , leibr-a4hf07 , leibr-a4hgl0 , leibr-a4hhu6 , leibr-a4hj94 , leibr-a4hk72 , leibr-a4hpa8 , leibr-a4hpz5 , leiin-a4huz4 , leiin-a4hxe0 , leiin-a4hxh8 , leiin-a4hxi1 , leiin-a4hxn7 , leiin-a4hyv9 , leiin-a4i1v9 , leiin-a4i4z6 , leiin-a4i6n9 , leiin-a4i7q7 , leiin-a4idl6 , leima-e9ady6 , leima-OPB , leima-q4q0t5 , leima-q4q8a8 , leima-q4q398 , leima-q4q942 , leima-q4qe85 , leima-q4qe86 , leima-q4qj45

Title : Common inheritance of chromosome Ia associated with clonal expansion of Toxoplasma gondii - Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
Author(s) : Khan A , Bohme U , Kelly KA , Adlem E , Brooks K , Simmonds M , Mungall K , Quail MA , Arrowsmith C , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Harris D , Collins M , Fosker N , Fraser A , Hance Z , Jagels K , Moule S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Rajandream MA , Saunders D , Seeger K , Whitehead S , Mayr T , Xuan X , Watanabe J , Suzuki Y , Wakaguri H , Sugano S , Sugimoto C , Paulsen I , Mackey AJ , Roos DS , Hall N , Berriman M , Barrell B , Sibley LD , Ajioka JW
Ref : Genome Res , 16 :1119 , 2006
Abstract : Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed protozoan parasite that can infect virtually all warm-blooded animals and humans. Despite the existence of a sexual phase in the life cycle, T. gondii has an unusual population structure dominated by three clonal lineages that predominate in North America and Europe, (Types I, II, and III). These lineages were founded by common ancestors approximately10,000 yr ago. The recent origin and widespread distribution of the clonal lineages is attributed to the circumvention of the sexual cycle by a new mode of transmission-asexual transmission between intermediate hosts. Asexual transmission appears to be multigenic and although the specific genes mediating this trait are unknown, it is predicted that all members of the clonal lineages should share the same alleles. Genetic mapping studies suggested that chromosome Ia was unusually monomorphic compared with the rest of the genome. To investigate this further, we sequenced chromosome Ia and chromosome Ib in the Type I strain, RH, and the Type II strain, ME49. Comparative genome analyses of the two chromosomal sequences revealed that the same copy of chromosome Ia was inherited in each lineage, whereas chromosome Ib maintained the same high frequency of between-strain polymorphism as the rest of the genome. Sampling of chromosome Ia sequence in seven additional representative strains from the three clonal lineages supports a monomorphic inheritance, which is unique within the genome. Taken together, our observations implicate a specific combination of alleles on chromosome Ia in the recent origin and widespread success of the clonal lineages of T. gondii.
ESTHER : Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
PubMedSearch : Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
PubMedID: 16902086
Gene_locus related to this paper: toxgo-q1jt22

Title : The genome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum - Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
Author(s) : Eichinger L , Pachebat JA , Glockner G , Rajandream MA , Sucgang R , Berriman M , Song J , Olsen R , Szafranski K , Xu Q , Tunggal B , Kummerfeld S , Madera M , Konfortov BA , Rivero F , Bankier AT , Lehmann R , Hamlin N , Davies R , Gaudet P , Fey P , Pilcher K , Chen G , Saunders D , Sodergren E , Davis P , Kerhornou A , Nie X , Hall N , Anjard C , Hemphill L , Bason N , Farbrother P , Desany B , Just E , Morio T , Rost R , Churcher C , Cooper J , Haydock S , van Driessche N , Cronin A , Goodhead I , Muzny D , Mourier T , Pain A , Lu M , Harper D , Lindsay R , Hauser H , James K , Quiles M , Madan Babu M , Saito T , Buchrieser C , Wardroper A , Felder M , Thangavelu M , Johnson D , Knights A , Loulseged H , Mungall K , Oliver K , Price C , Quail MA , Urushihara H , Hernandez J , Rabbinowitsch E , Steffen D , Sanders M , Ma J , Kohara Y , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Spiegler S , Tivey A , Sugano S , White B , Walker D , Woodward J , Winckler T , Tanaka Y , Shaulsky G , Schleicher M , Weinstock G , Rosenthal A , Cox EC , Chisholm RL , Gibbs R , Loomis WF , Platzer M , Kay RR , Williams J , Dear PH , Noegel AA , Barrell B , Kuspa A
Ref : Nature , 435 :43 , 2005
Abstract : The social amoebae are exceptional in their ability to alternate between unicellular and multicellular forms. Here we describe the genome of the best-studied member of this group, Dictyostelium discoideum. The gene-dense chromosomes of this organism encode approximately 12,500 predicted proteins, a high proportion of which have long, repetitive amino acid tracts. There are many genes for polyketide synthases and ABC transporters, suggesting an extensive secondary metabolism for producing and exporting small molecules. The genome is rich in complex repeats, one class of which is clustered and may serve as centromeres. Partial copies of the extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) element are found at the ends of each chromosome, suggesting a novel telomere structure and the use of a common mechanism to maintain both the rDNA and chromosomal termini. A proteome-based phylogeny shows that the amoebozoa diverged from the animal-fungal lineage after the plant-animal split, but Dictyostelium seems to have retained more of the diversity of the ancestral genome than have plants, animals or fungi.
ESTHER : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedSearch : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedID: 15875012
Gene_locus related to this paper: dicdi-abhd , dicdi-ACHE , dicdi-apra , dicdi-cinbp , dicdi-CMBL , dicdi-crysp , dicdi-DPOA , dicdi-P90528 , dicdi-ppme1 , dicdi-Q8MYE7 , dicdi-q54cf7 , dicdi-q54cl7 , dicdi-q54cm0 , dicdi-q54ct5 , dicdi-q54cu1 , dicdi-q54d54 , dicdi-q54d66 , dicdi-q54dj5 , dicdi-q54dy7 , dicdi-q54ek1 , dicdi-q54eq6 , dicdi-q54et1 , dicdi-q54et7 , dicdi-q54f01 , dicdi-q54g24 , dicdi-q54g47 , dicdi-q54gi7 , dicdi-q54gw5 , dicdi-q54gx3 , dicdi-q54h23 , dicdi-q54h73 , dicdi-q54i38 , dicdi-q54ie5 , dicdi-q54in4 , dicdi-q54kz1 , dicdi-q54l36 , dicdi-q54li1 , dicdi-q54m29 , dicdi-q54n21 , dicdi-q54n35 , dicdi-q54n85 , dicdi-q54qe7 , dicdi-q54qi3 , dicdi-q54qk2 , dicdi-q54rl3 , dicdi-q54rl8 , dicdi-q54sy6 , dicdi-q54sz3 , dicdi-q54t49 , dicdi-q54t91 , dicdi-q54th2 , dicdi-q54u01 , dicdi-q54vc2 , dicdi-q54vw1 , dicdi-q54xe3 , dicdi-q54xl3 , dicdi-q54xu1 , dicdi-q54xu2 , dicdi-q54y48 , dicdi-q54yd0 , dicdi-q54ye0 , dicdi-q54yl1 , dicdi-q54yr8 , dicdi-q54z90 , dicdi-q55bx3 , dicdi-q55d01 , dicdi-q55d81 , dicdi-q55du6 , dicdi-q55eu1 , dicdi-q55eu8 , dicdi-q55fk4 , dicdi-q55gk7 , dicdi-Q54ZA6 , dicdi-q86h82 , dicdi-Q86HC9 , dicdi-Q86HM5 , dicdi-Q86HM6 , dicdi-q86iz7 , dicdi-q86jb6 , dicdi-Q86KU7 , dicdi-q550s3 , dicdi-q552c0 , dicdi-q553t5 , dicdi-q555e5 , dicdi-q555h0 , dicdi-q555h1 , dicdi-q557k5 , dicdi-q558u2 , dicdi-Q869Q8 , dicdi-u554 , dicdi-y9086 , dicdi-q54r44 , dicdi-f172a

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : A comprehensive survey of the Plasmodium life cycle by genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses - Hall_2005_Science_307_82
Author(s) : Hall N , Karras M , Raine JD , Carlton JM , Kooij TW , Berriman M , Florens L , Janssen CS , Pain A , Christophides GK , James K , Rutherford K , Harris B , Harris D , Churcher C , Quail MA , Ormond D , Doggett J , Trueman HE , Mendoza J , Bidwell SL , Rajandream MA , Carucci DJ , Yates JR, 3rd , Kafatos FC , Janse CJ , Barrell B , Turner CM , Waters AP , Sinden RE
Ref : Science , 307 :82 , 2005
Abstract : Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium chabaudi are widely used model malaria species. Comparison of their genomes, integrated with proteomic and microarray data, with the genomes of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii revealed a conserved core of 4500 Plasmodium genes in the central regions of the 14 chromosomes and highlighted genes evolving rapidly because of stage-specific selective pressures. Four strategies for gene expression are apparent during the parasites' life cycle: (i) housekeeping; (ii) host-related; (iii) strategy-specific related to invasion, asexual replication, and sexual development; and (iv) stage-specific. We observed posttranscriptional gene silencing through translational repression of messenger RNA during sexual development, and a 47-base 3' untranslated region motif is implicated in this process.
ESTHER : Hall_2005_Science_307_82
PubMedSearch : Hall_2005_Science_307_82
PubMedID: 15637271
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaba-q4ymx5 , plaba-q4ysr8 , plaba-q4ytp7 , plaba-q4yy11 , plaba-q4z0q9 , plaba-q4z5y0 , plaba-q4z5z8 , plaba-q4z215 , plach-q4x817 , plach-q4xb56 , plach-q4xbi1 , plach-q4xd64 , plach-q4xfc7 , plach-q4xm16 , plach-q4xmx8 , plach-q4xmy0 , plach-q4xsf9 , plach-q4xsg4 , plach-q4xsw6 , plach-q4xvc8 , plach-q4xxw0 , plach-q4xxy1 , plach-q4y0k9 , plach-q4y5u9 , plach-q4y6j0 , plach-q4y638 , plach-q4y740 , playo-PY05572 , playo-q7rq09

Title : The genome of the kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania major - Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
Author(s) : Ivens AC , Peacock CS , Worthey EA , Murphy L , Aggarwal G , Berriman M , Sisk E , Rajandream MA , Adlem E , Aert R , Anupama A , Apostolou Z , Attipoe P , Bason N , Bauser C , Beck A , Beverley SM , Bianchettin G , Borzym K , Bothe G , Bruschi CV , Collins M , Cadag E , Ciarloni L , Clayton C , Coulson RM , Cronin A , Cruz AK , Davies RM , De Gaudenzi J , Dobson DE , Duesterhoeft A , Fazelina G , Fosker N , Frasch AC , Fraser A , Fuchs M , Gabel C , Goble A , Goffeau A , Harris D , Hertz-Fowler C , Hilbert H , Horn D , Huang Y , Klages S , Knights A , Kube M , Larke N , Litvin L , Lord A , Louie T , Marra M , Masuy D , Matthews K , Michaeli S , Mottram JC , Muller-Auer S , Munden H , Nelson S , Norbertczak H , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pentony M , Pohl TM , Price C , Purnelle B , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Reinhardt R , Rieger M , Rinta J , Robben J , Robertson L , Ruiz JC , Rutter S , Saunders D , Schafer M , Schein J , Schwartz DC , Seeger K , Seyler A , Sharp S , Shin H , Sivam D , Squares R , Squares S , Tosato V , Vogt C , Volckaert G , Wambutt R , Warren T , Wedler H , Woodward J , Zhou S , Zimmermann W , Smith DF , Blackwell JM , Stuart KD , Barrell B , Myler PJ
Ref : Science , 309 :436 , 2005
Abstract : Leishmania species cause a spectrum of human diseases in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. We have sequenced the 36 chromosomes of the 32.8-megabase haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) and predict 911 RNA genes, 39 pseudogenes, and 8272 protein-coding genes, of which 36% can be ascribed a putative function. These include genes involved in host-pathogen interactions, such as proteolytic enzymes, and extensive machinery for synthesis of complex surface glycoconjugates. The organization of protein-coding genes into long, strand-specific, polycistronic clusters and lack of general transcription factors in the L. major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Tritryp) genomes suggest that the mechanisms regulating RNA polymerase II-directed transcription are distinct from those operating in other eukaryotes, although the trypanosomatids appear capable of chromatin remodeling. Abundant RNA-binding proteins are encoded in the Tritryp genomes, consistent with active posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression.
ESTHER : Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
PubMedSearch : Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
PubMedID: 16020728
Gene_locus related to this paper: leima-e9ady6 , leima-L2464.12 , leima-L2802.02 , leima-OPB , leima-q4fw33 , leima-q4fwg8 , leima-q4fwj0 , leima-q4fya7 , leima-q4q0a1 , leima-q4q0t5 , leima-q4q0v0 , leima-q4q1h9 , leima-q4q2c9 , leima-q4q4j7 , leima-q4q4t6 , leima-q4q5j1 , leima-q4q6e9 , leima-q4q7v8 , leima-q4q8a8 , leima-q4q9g9 , leima-q4q080 , leima-q4q398 , leima-q4q615 , leima-q4q819 , leima-q4q871 , leima-q4q942 , leima-q4qae7 , leima-q4qb85 , leima-q4qdz7 , leima-q4qe26 , leima-q4qe31 , leima-q4qe85 , leima-q4qe86 , leima-q4qe87 , leima-q4qe90 , leima-q4qec8 , leima-q4qgz4 , leima-q4qgz5 , leima-q4qhs0 , leima-q4qj45

Title : Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Pain A , Anderson MJ , Wortman JR , Kim HS , Arroyo J , Berriman M , Abe K , Archer DB , Bermejo C , Bennett J , Bowyer P , Chen D , Collins M , Coulsen R , Davies R , Dyer PS , Farman M , Fedorova N , Feldblyum TV , Fischer R , Fosker N , Fraser A , Garcia JL , Garcia MJ , Goble A , Goldman GH , Gomi K , Griffith-Jones S , Gwilliam R , Haas B , Haas H , Harris D , Horiuchi H , Huang J , Humphray S , Jimenez J , Keller N , Khouri H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Konzack S , Kulkarni R , Kumagai T , Lafon A , Latge JP , Li W , Lord A , Lu C , Majoros WH , May GS , Miller BL , Mohamoud Y , Molina M , Monod M , Mouyna I , Mulligan S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Paulsen I , Penalva MA , Pertea M , Price C , Pritchard BL , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlins N , Rajandream MA , Reichard U , Renauld H , Robson GD , Rodriguez de Cordoba S , Rodriguez-Pena JM , Ronning CM , Rutter S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez M , Sanchez-Ferrero JC , Saunders D , Seeger K , Squares R , Squares S , Takeuchi M , Tekaia F , Turner G , Vazquez de Aldana CR , Weidman J , White O , Woodward J , Yu JH , Fraser C , Galagan JE , Asai K , Machida M , Hall N , Barrell B , Denning DW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1151 , 2005
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedID: 16372009
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-apth1 , aspfu-axe1 , aspfu-CBPYA , aspfu-faec , aspfu-kex1 , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4wa39 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wkh6 , aspfu-q4wnx3 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q5vjg7 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspfu-fmac

Title : Genome of the host-cell transforming parasite Theileria annulata compared with T. parva - Pain_2005_Science_309_131
Author(s) : Pain A , Renauld H , Berriman M , Murphy L , Yeats CA , Weir W , Kerhornou A , Aslett M , Bishop R , Bouchier C , Cochet M , Coulson RM , Cronin A , de Villiers EP , Fraser A , Fosker N , Gardner M , Goble A , Griffiths-Jones S , Harris DE , Katzer F , Larke N , Lord A , Maser P , McKellar S , Mooney P , Morton F , Nene V , O'Neil S , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlings ND , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Shah T , Squares R , Squares S , Tivey A , Walker AR , Woodward J , Dobbelaere DA , Langsley G , Rajandream MA , McKeever D , Shiels B , Tait A , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Science , 309 :131 , 2005
Abstract : Theileria annulata and T. parva are closely related protozoan parasites that cause lymphoproliferative diseases of cattle. We sequenced the genome of T. annulata and compared it with that of T. parva to understand the mechanisms underlying transformation and tropism. Despite high conservation of gene sequences and synteny, the analysis reveals unequally expanded gene families and species-specific genes. We also identify divergent families of putative secreted polypeptides that may reduce immune recognition, candidate regulators of host-cell transformation, and a Theileria-specific protein domain [frequently associated in Theileria (FAINT)] present in a large number of secreted proteins.
ESTHER : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedSearch : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedID: 15994557
Gene_locus related to this paper: thean-q4u9u6 , thean-q4ub48 , thean-q4ubz1 , thean-q4uc78 , thean-q4uc93 , thean-q4uck1 , thean-q4udw9 , thean-q4ue56 , thean-q4uf06 , thean-q4ug98 , thean-q4uhj9 , thepa-q4n349

Title : Insight into the genome of Aspergillus fumigatus: analysis of a 922 kb region encompassing the nitrate assimilation gene cluster - Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
Author(s) : Pain A , Woodward J , Quail MA , Anderson MJ , Clark R , Collins M , Fosker N , Fraser A , Harris D , Larke N , Murphy L , Humphray S , O'Neil S , Pertea M , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Salzberg S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Warren T , Denning DW , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Fungal Genet Biol , 41 :443 , 2004
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is the most ubiquitous opportunistic filamentous fungal pathogen of human. As an initial step toward sequencing the entire genome of A. fumigatus, which is estimated to be approximately 30 Mb in size, we have sequenced a 922 kb region, contained within 16 overlapping bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Fifty-four percent of the DNA is predicted to be coding with 341 putative protein coding genes. Functional classification of the proteins showed the presence of a higher proportion of enzymes and membrane transporters when compared to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to the nitrate assimilation gene cluster, the quinate utilisation gene cluster is also present on this 922 kb genomic sequence. We observed large scale synteny between A. fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans by comparing this sequence to the A. nidulans genetic map of linkage group VIII.
ESTHER : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedSearch : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedID: 14998527
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfu-q6my76 , aspfu-q6myf7 , aspfu-q6myz3

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 - Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
Author(s) : Hall N , Pain A , Berriman M , Churcher C , Harris B , Harris D , Mungall K , Bowman S , Atkin R , Baker S , Barron A , Brooks K , Buckee CO , Burrows C , Cherevach I , Chillingworth C , Chillingworth T , Christodoulou Z , Clark L , Clark R , Corton C , Cronin A , Davies R , Davis P , Dear P , Dearden F , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Goodhead I , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Hance Z , Harper D , Hauser H , Hornsby T , Holroyd S , Horrocks P , Humphray S , Jagels K , James KD , Johnson D , Kerhornou A , Knights A , Konfortov B , Kyes S , Larke N , Lawson D , Lennard N , Line A , Maddison M , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Ormond D , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Rutherford KM , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Seeger K , Sharp S , Smith R , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Tivey A , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Sulston JE , Craig A , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 419 :527 , 2002
Abstract : Since the sequencing of the first two chromosomes of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there has been a concerted effort to sequence and assemble the entire genome of this organism. Here we report the sequence of chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 of P. falciparum clone 3D7--these chromosomes account for approximately 55% of the total genome. We describe the methods used to map, sequence and annotate these chromosomes. By comparing our assemblies with the optical map, we indicate the completeness of the resulting sequence. During annotation, we assign Gene Ontology terms to the predicted gene products, and observe clustering of some malaria-specific terms to specific chromosomes. We identify a highly conserved sequence element found in the intergenic region of internal var genes that is not associated with their telomeric counterparts.
ESTHER : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedSearch : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedID: 12368867
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plafa-MAL6P1.135 , plafa-PFD0185C , plafa-PFI1775W , plafa-PFI1800W

Title : Complete genome sequence of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) - Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
Author(s) : Bentley SD , Chater KF , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Challis GL , Thomson NR , James KD , Harris DE , Quail MA , Kieser H , Harper D , Bateman A , Brown S , Chandra G , Chen CW , Collins M , Cronin A , Fraser A , Goble A , Hidalgo J , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huang CH , Kieser T , Larke L , Murphy L , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Seeger K , Saunders D , Sharp S , Squares R , Squares S , Taylor K , Warren T , Wietzorrek A , Woodward J , Barrell BG , Parkhill J , Hopwood DA
Ref : Nature , 417 :141 , 2002
Abstract : Streptomyces coelicolor is a representative of the group of soil-dwelling, filamentous bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. Here we report the 8,667,507 base pair linear chromosome of this organism, containing the largest number of genes so far discovered in a bacterium. The 7,825 predicted genes include more than 20 clusters coding for known or predicted secondary metabolites. The genome contains an unprecedented proportion of regulatory genes, predominantly those likely to be involved in responses to external stimuli and stresses, and many duplicated gene sets that may represent 'tissue-specific' isoforms operating in different phases of colonial development, a unique situation for a bacterium. An ancient synteny was revealed between the central 'core' of the chromosome and the whole chromosome of pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The genome sequence will greatly increase our understanding of microbial life in the soil as well as aiding the generation of new drug candidates by genetic engineering.
ESTHER : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedSearch : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedID: 12000953
Gene_locus related to this paper: strco-cxest , strco-cxest2 , strco-ester , strco-estli , strco-MMYT , strco-ORF3 , strco-q9f2m1 , strco-q9rdq9 , strco-q9x8r0 , strco-SC1A6.21 , strco-SC3F7.14 , strco-SC4C2.18 , strco-SC10F4.23 , strco-SCBAC20F6.10 , strco-SCD95A , strco-SCE8.12C , strco-SCE63.01 , strco-SCF43.16C , strco-SCJ9A.33C , strco-SCO0047 , strco-SCO0135 , strco-SCO0490 , strco-SCO0503 , strco-SCO0556.1 , strco-SCO0556.2 , strco-SCO1265 , strco-SCO2123 , strco-SCO2516 , strco-SCO2723 , strco-SCO2761 , strco-SCO3396 , strco-SCO3772 , strco-SCO4160 , strco-SCO4900 , strco-SCO5215 , strco-SCO5986 , strco-SCO6351 , strco-SCO6488 , strco-SCO7057 , strco-SCO7121 , strco-SCO7396 , strco-SCO7609 , strco-SCOT , strco-SLPD , strco-TAP

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : Complete DNA sequence of a serogroup A strain of Neisseria meningitidis Z2491 - Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Achtman M , James KD , Bentley SD , Churcher C , Klee SR , Morelli G , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Davies RM , Davis P , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Leather S , Moule S , Mungall K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Whitehead S , Spratt BG , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 404 :502 , 2000
Abstract : Neisseria meningitidis causes bacterial meningitis and is therefore responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in both the developed and the developing world. Meningococci are opportunistic pathogens that colonize the nasopharynges and oropharynges of asymptomatic carriers. For reasons that are still mostly unknown, they occasionally gain access to the blood, and subsequently to the cerebrospinal fluid, to cause septicaemia and meningitis. N. meningitidis strains are divided into a number of serogroups on the basis of the immunochemistry of their capsular polysaccharides; serogroup A strains are responsible for major epidemics and pandemics of meningococcal disease, and therefore most of the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Here we have determined the complete genome sequence of a serogroup A strain of Neisseria meningitidis, Z2491. The sequence is 2,184,406 base pairs in length, with an overall G+C content of 51.8%, and contains 2,121 predicted coding sequences. The most notable feature of the genome is the presence of many hundreds of repetitive elements, ranging from short repeats, positioned either singly or in large multiple arrays, to insertion sequences and gene duplications of one kilobase or more. Many of these repeats appear to be involved in genome fluidity and antigenic variation in this important human pathogen.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2000_Nature_404_502
PubMedID: 10761919
Gene_locus related to this paper: neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB1877 , neimf-a1kta9 , neime-r0tza2

Title : The genome sequence of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni reveals hypervariable sequences - Parkhill_2000_Nature_403_665
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Wren BW , Mungall K , Ketley JM , Churcher C , Basham D , Chillingworth T , Davies RM , Feltwell T , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Karlyshev AV , Moule S , Pallen MJ , Penn CW , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , van Vliet AH , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 403 :665 , 2000
Abstract : Campylobacter jejuni, from the delta-epsilon group of proteobacteria, is a microaerophilic, Gram-negative, flagellate, spiral bacterium-properties it shares with the related gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. It is the leading cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. In addition, infection with C. jejuni is the most frequent antecedent to a form of neuromuscular paralysis known as Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here we report the genome sequence of C. jejuni NCTC11168. C. jejuni has a circular chromosome of 1,641,481 base pairs (30.6% G+C) which is predicted to encode 1,654 proteins and 54 stable RNA species. The genome is unusual in that there are virtually no insertion sequences or phage-associated sequences and very few repeat sequences. One of the most striking findings in the genome was the presence of hypervariable sequences. These short homopolymeric runs of nucleotides were commonly found in genes encoding the biosynthesis or modification of surface structures, or in closely linked genes of unknown function. The apparently high rate of variation of these homopolymeric tracts may be important in the survival strategy of C. jejuni.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2000_Nature_403_665
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2000_Nature_403_665
PubMedID: 10688204
Gene_locus related to this paper: camco-e0qbj3 , camco-q4hhu5 , camje-a3zji1 , camje-CJ0796C , camjr-q5ht69 , camju-a3yll6 , camju-Q9ZF63

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 4 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
Author(s) : Mayer K , Schuller C , Wambutt R , Murphy G , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Harris B , Ansorge W , Brandt P , Grivell L , Rieger M , Weichselgartner M , de Simone V , Obermaier B , Mache R , Muller M , Kreis M , Delseny M , Puigdomenech P , Watson M , Schmidtheini T , Reichert B , Portatelle D , Perez-Alonso M , Boutry M , Bancroft I , Vos P , Hoheisel J , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Ridley P , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Bilham L , Robben J , Van der Schueren J , Grymonprez B , Chuang YJ , Vandenbussche F , Braeken M , Weltjens I , Voet M , Bastiaens I , Aert R , Defoor E , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Ramsperger U , Hilbert H , Braun M , Holzer E , Brandt A , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirske W , Mooijman P , Klein Lankhorst R , Rose M , Hauf J , Kotter P , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Van den Daele H , De Keyser A , Buysshaert C , Gielen J , Villarroel R , De Clercq R , van Montagu M , Rogers J , Cronin A , Quail M , Bray-Allen S , Clark L , Doggett J , Hall S , Kay M , Lennard N , McLay K , Mayes R , Pettett A , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Benes V , Rechmann S , Borkova D , Blocker H , Scharfe M , Grimm M , Lohnert TH , Dose S , de Haan M , Maarse A , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Fartmann B , Granderath K , Dauner D , Herzl A , Neumann S , Argiriou A , Vitale D , Liguori R , Piravandi E , Massenet O , Quigley F , Clabauld G , Mundlein A , Felber R , Schnabl S , Hiller R , Schmidt W , Lecharny A , Aubourg S , Chefdor F , Cooke R , Berger C , Montfort A , Casacuberta E , Gibbons T , Weber N , Vandenbol M , Bargues M , Terol J , Torres A , Perez-Perez A , Purnelle B , Bent E , Johnson S , Tacon D , Jesse T , Heijnen L , Schwarz S , Scholler P , Heber S , Francs P , Bielke C , Frishman D , Haase D , Lemcke K , Mewes HW , Stocker S , Zaccaria P , Bevan M , Wilson RK , de la Bastide M , Habermann K , Parnell L , Dedhia N , Gnoj L , Schutz K , Huang E , Spiegel L , Sehkon M , Murray J , Sheet P , Cordes M , Abu-Threideh J , Stoneking T , Kalicki J , Graves T , Harmon G , Edwards J , Latreille P , Courtney L , Cloud J , Abbott A , Scott K , Johnson D , Minx P , Bentley D , Fulton B , Miller N , Greco T , Kemp K , Kramer J , Fulton L , Mardis E , Dante M , Pepin K , Hillier L , Nelson J , Spieth J , Ryan E , Andrews S , Geisel C , Layman D , Du H , Ali J , Berghoff A , Jones K , Drone K , Cotton M , Joshu C , Antonoiu B , Zidanic M , Strong C , Sun H , Lamar B , Yordan C , Ma P , Zhong J , Preston R , Vil D , Shekher M , Matero A , Shah R , Swaby IK , O'Shaughnessy A , Rodriguez M , Hoffmann J , Till S , Granat S , Shohdy N , Hasegawa A , Hameed A , Lodhi M , Johnson A , Chen E , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR
Ref : Nature , 402 :769 , 1999
Abstract : The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the sequence of chromosome 4. Analysis of 17.38 megabases of unique sequence, representing about 17% of the genome, reveals 3,744 protein coding genes, 81 transfer RNAs and numerous repeat elements. Heterochromatic regions surrounding the putative centromere, which has not yet been completely sequenced, are characterized by an increased frequency of a variety of repeats, new repeats, reduced recombination, lowered gene density and lowered gene expression. Roughly 60% of the predicted protein-coding genes have been functionally characterized on the basis of their homology to known genes. Many genes encode predicted proteins that are homologous to human and Caenorhabditis elegans proteins.
ESTHER : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedSearch : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedID: 10617198
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT4G00500 , arath-AT4G16690 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-AT4g30610 , arath-o65513 , arath-o65713 , arath-LPAAT , arath-f4jt64

Title : The complete nucleotide sequence of chromosome 3 of Plasmodium falciparum - Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
Author(s) : Bowman S , Lawson D , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Churcher CM , Craig A , Davies RM , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Harris D , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Horrocks P , Jagels K , Jassal B , Kyes S , McLean J , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 400 :532 , 1999
Abstract : Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 3, and comparison with chromosome 2, highlights novel features of chromosome organization and gene structure. The sub-telomeric regions of chromosome 3 show a conserved order of features, including repetitive DNA sequences, members of multigene families involved in pathogenesis and antigenic variation, a number of conserved pseudogenes, and several genes of unknown function. A putative centromere has been identified that has a core region of about 2 kilobases with an extremely high (adenine + thymidine) composition and arrays of tandem repeats. We have predicted 215 protein-coding genes and two transfer RNA genes in the 1,060,106-base-pair chromosome sequence. The predicted protein-coding genes can be divided into three main classes: 52.6% are not spliced, 45.1% have a large exon with short additional 5' or 3' exons, and 2.3% have a multiple exon structure more typical of higher eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedSearch : Bowman_1999_Nature_400_532
PubMedID: 10448855
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-PFC0950C

Title : Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence - Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
Author(s) : Cole ST , Brosch R , Parkhill J , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Gordon SV , Eiglmeier K , Gas S , Barry CE, 3rd , Tekaia F , Badcock K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies R , Devlin K , Feltwell T , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Krogh A , McLean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Osborne J , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Rutter S , Seeger K , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Sulston JE , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 393 :537 , 1998
Abstract : Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,529 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. M. tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation.
ESTHER : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedSearch : Cole_1998_Nature_393_537
PubMedID: 9634230
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-cut3 , myctu-cutas1 , myctu-cutas2 , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-lipJ , myctu-LIPS , myctu-lipv , myctu-LPQC , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT1628 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-Rv1426c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-RV3473C , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV - Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
Author(s) : Jacq C , Alt-Morbe J , Andre B , Arnold W , Bahr A , Ballesta JP , Bargues M , Baron L , Becker A , Biteau N , Blocker H , Blugeon C , Boskovic J , Brandt P , Bruckner M , Buitrago MJ , Coster F , Delaveau T , del Rey F , Dujon B , Eide LG , Garcia-Cantalejo JM , Goffeau A , Gomez-Peris AC , Granotier C , Hanemann V , Hankeln T , Hoheisel JD , Jager W , Jimenez A , Jonniaux JL , Kramer C , Kuster H , Laamanen P , Legros Y , Louis E , Muller-Rieker S , Monnet A , Moro M , Muller-Auer S , Nussbaumer B , Paricio N , Paulin L , Perea J , Perez-Alonso M , Perez-Ortin JE , Pohl TM , Prydz H , Purnelle B , Rasmussen SW , Remacha M , Revuelta JL , Rieger M , Salom D , Saluz HP , Saiz JE , Saren AM , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Schmidt ER , Schneider C , Scholler P , Schwarz S , Soler-Mira A , Urrestarazu LA , Verhasselt P , Vissers S , Voet M , Volckaert G , Wagner G , Wambutt R , Wedler E , Wedler H , Wolfl S , Harris DE , Bowman S , Brown D , Churcher CM , Connor R , Dedman K , Gentles S , Hamlin N , Hunt S , Jones L , McDonald S , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , Rajandream MA , Richards C , Shore L , Walsh SV , Barrell BG , Dietrich FS , Mulligan J , Allen E , Araujo R , Aviles E , Berno A , Carpenter J , Chen E , Cherry JM , Chung E , Duncan M , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Komp C , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin D , Mosedale D , Nakahara K , Namath A , Oefner P , Oh C , Petel FX , Roberts D , Schramm S , Schroeder M , Shogren T , Shroff N , Winant A , Yelton M , Botstein D , Davis RW , Johnston M , Hillier L , Riles L , Albermann K , Hani J , Heumann K , Kleine K , Mewes HW , Zollner A , Zaccaria P
Ref : Nature , 387 :75 , 1997
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV has been determined. Apart from chromosome XII, which contains the 1-2 Mb rDNA cluster, chromosome IV is the longest S. cerevisiae chromosome. It was split into three parts, which were sequenced by a consortium from the European Community, the Sanger Centre, and groups from St Louis and Stanford in the United States. The sequence of 1,531,974 base pairs contains 796 predicted or known genes, 318 (39.9%) of which have been previously identified. Of the 478 new genes, 225 (28.3%) are homologous to previously identified genes and 253 (32%) have unknown functions or correspond to spurious open reading frames (ORFs). On average there is one gene approximately every two kilobases. Superimposed on alternating regional variations in G+C composition, there is a large central domain with a lower G+C content that contains all the yeast transposon (Ty) elements and most of the tRNA genes. Chromosome IV shares with chromosomes II, V, XII, XIII and XV some long clustered duplications which partly explain its origin.
ESTHER : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedSearch : Jacq_1997_Nature_387_75
PubMedID: 9169867
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-dlhh , yeast-ECM18 , yeast-YDL109C , yeast-YDR428C , yeast-YDR444W

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XVI - Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
Author(s) : Bussey H , Storms RK , Ahmed A , Albermann K , Allen E , Ansorge W , Araujo R , Aparicio A , Barrell B , Badcock K , Benes V , Botstein D , Bowman S , Bruckner M , Carpenter J , Cherry JM , Chung E , Churcher C , Coster F , Davis K , Davis RW , Dietrich FS , Delius H , DiPaolo T , Dubois E , Dusterhoft A , Duncan M , Floeth M , Fortin N , Friesen JD , Fritz C , Goffeau A , Hall J , Hebling U , Heumann K , Hilbert H , Hillier L , Hunicke-Smith S , Hyman R , Johnston M , Kalman S , Kleine K , Komp C , Kurdi O , Lashkari D , Lew H , Lin A , Lin D , Louis EJ , Marathe R , Messenguy F , Mewes HW , Mirtipati S , Moestl D , Muller-Auer S , Namath A , Nentwich U , Oefner P , Pearson D , Petel FX , Pohl TM , Purnelle B , Rajandream MA , Rechmann S , Rieger M , Riles L , Roberts D , Schafer M , Scharfe M , Scherens B , Schramm S , Schroder M , Sdicu AM , Tettelin H , Urrestarazu LA , Ushinsky S , Vierendeels F , Vissers S , Voss H , Walsh SV , Wambutt R , Wang Y , Wedler E , Wedler H , Winnett E , Zhong WW , Zollner A , Vo DH , Hani J
Ref : Nature , 387 :103 , 1997
Abstract : The nucleotide sequence of the 948,061 base pairs of chromosome XVI has been determined, completing the sequence of the yeast genome. Chromosome XVI was the last yeast chromosome identified, and some of the genes mapped early to it, such as GAL4, PEP4 and RAD1 (ref. 2) have played important roles in the development of yeast biology. The architecture of this final chromosome seems to be typical of the large yeast chromosomes, and shows large duplications with other yeast chromosomes. Chromosome XVI contains 487 potential protein-encoding genes, 17 tRNA genes and two small nuclear RNA genes; 27% of the genes have significant similarities to human gene products, and 48% are new and of unknown biological function. Systematic efforts to explore gene function have begun.
ESTHER : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedSearch : Bussey_1997_Nature_387_103
PubMedID: 9169875
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-MCFS1 , yeast-YPR147C