Ming Y

References (5)

Title : Tabersonine Induces the Apoptosis of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma In vitro and In vivo - Li_2024_Anticancer.Agents.Med.Chem__
Author(s) : Li X , Chen L , Deng Y , Zheng Z , Ming Y
Ref : Anticancer Agents Med Chem , : , 2024
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Tabersonine, a natural indole alkaloid derived from Apocynaceae plants, exhibits antiinflammatory and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities, among other pharmacological effects. However, its anti-tumor properties and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain underexplored. OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to investigate the anti-tumor effects of tabersonine and its mechanisms in inducing apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODS: The inhibitory effects of tabersonine on the viability and proliferation of liver cancer cells were evaluated using MTT assay and colony formation assay. AO/EB, Hoechst, and Annexin V-FITC/ PI staining techniques were employed to observe cell damage and apoptosis. JC-1 staining was used to detect changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blot analysis was conducted to study the anti-tumor mechanism of tabersonine on liver cancer cells. Additionally, a xenograft model using mice hepatoma HepG2 cells was established to assess the anti-tumor potency of tabersonine in vivo. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Our findings revealed that tabersonine significantly inhibited cell viability and proliferation, inducing apoptosis in liver cancer cells. Treatment with tabersonine inhibited Akt phosphorylation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and increased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. These findings suggested that tabersonine induces apoptosis in liver cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Furthermore, tabersonine treatment activated the death receptor pathway of apoptosis. In vivo studies demonstrated that tabersonine significantly inhibited xenograft tumor growth. CONCLUSION: Our study is the first to demonstrate that tabersonine induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells through both mitochondrial and death receptor apoptotic pathways, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic agent candidate for hepatic cancer.
ESTHER : Li_2024_Anticancer.Agents.Med.Chem__
PubMedSearch : Li_2024_Anticancer.Agents.Med.Chem__
PubMedID: 38465429

Title : Molecular footprints of inshore aquatic adaptation in Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) - Ming_2019_Genomics_111_1034
Author(s) : Ming Y , Jian J , Yu F , Yu X , Wang J , Liu W
Ref : Genomics , 111 :1034 , 2019
Abstract : The Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, Sousa chinensis, being a member of cetaceans, had fully adapted to inshore waters. As a threatened marine mammal, little molecular information available for understanding the genetic basis of ecological adaptation. We firstly sequenced and obtained the draft genome map of S. chinensis. Phylogenetic analysis in this study, based on the single copy orthologous genes of the draft genome, is consistent with traditional phylogenetic classification. The comparative genomic analysis indicated that S. chinensis had 494 species-specific gene families, which involved immune, DNA repair and sensory systems associated with the potential adaption mechanism. We also identified the expansion and positive selection genes in S. chinensis lineage to investigate the potential adaptation mechanism. Our study provided the potential insight into the molecular bases of ecological adaptation in Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin and will be also valuable for future understanding the ecological adaptation and evolution of cetaceans at the genomic level.
ESTHER : Ming_2019_Genomics_111_1034
PubMedSearch : Ming_2019_Genomics_111_1034
PubMedID: 30031902
Gene_locus related to this paper: delle-a0a2y9mw48

Title : A comprehensive draft genome sequence for lupin (Lupinus angustifolius), an emerging health food: insights into plant-microbe interactions and legume evolution - Hane_2017_Plant.Biotechnol.J_15_318
Author(s) : Hane JK , Ming Y , Kamphuis LG , Nelson MN , Garg G , Atkins CA , Bayer PE , Bravo A , Bringans S , Cannon S , Edwards D , Foley R , Gao LL , Harrison MJ , Huang W , Hurgobin B , Li S , Liu CW , McGrath A , Morahan G , Murray J , Weller J , Jian J , Singh KB
Ref : Plant Biotechnol J , 15 :318 , 2017
Abstract : Lupins are important grain legume crops that form a critical part of sustainable farming systems, reducing fertilizer use and providing disease breaks. It has a basal phylogenetic position relative to other crop and model legumes and a high speciation rate. Narrow-leafed lupin (NLL; Lupinus angustifolius L.) is gaining popularity as a health food, which is high in protein and dietary fibre but low in starch and gluten-free. We report the draft genome assembly (609 Mb) of NLL cultivar Tanjil, which has captured >98% of the gene content, sequences of additional lines and a dense genetic map. Lupins are unique among legumes and differ from most other land plants in that they do not form mycorrhizal associations. Remarkably, we find that NLL has lost all mycorrhiza-specific genes, but has retained genes commonly required for mycorrhization and nodulation. In addition, the genome also provided candidate genes for key disease resistance and domestication traits. We also find evidence of a whole-genome triplication at around 25 million years ago in the genistoid lineage leading to Lupinus. Our results will support detailed studies of legume evolution and accelerate lupin breeding programmes.
ESTHER : Hane_2017_Plant.Biotechnol.J_15_318
PubMedSearch : Hane_2017_Plant.Biotechnol.J_15_318
PubMedID: 27557478
Gene_locus related to this paper: lupan-a0a1j7h2u5 , lupan-a0a4p1r201 , lupan-a0a4p1rve4 , lupan-a0a1j7inr2 , lupan-a0a4p1rbl4 , lupan-a0a1j7ifk4 , lupan-a0a4p1rs77 , lupan-a0a1j7h5s4

Title : The draft genomes of soft-shell turtle and green sea turtle yield insights into the development and evolution of the turtle-specific body plan - Wang_2013_Nat.Genet_45_701
Author(s) : Wang Z , Pascual-Anaya J , Zadissa A , Li W , Niimura Y , Huang Z , Li C , White S , Xiong Z , Fang D , Wang B , Ming Y , Chen Y , Zheng Y , Kuraku S , Pignatelli M , Herrero J , Beal K , Nozawa M , Li Q , Wang J , Zhang H , Yu L , Shigenobu S , Liu J , Flicek P , Searle S , Kuratani S , Yin Y , Aken B , Zhang G , Irie N
Ref : Nat Genet , 45 :701 , 2013
Abstract : The unique anatomical features of turtles have raised unanswered questions about the origin of their unique body plan. We generated and analyzed draft genomes of the soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas); our results indicated the close relationship of the turtles to the bird-crocodilian lineage, from which they split approximately 267.9-248.3 million years ago (Upper Permian to Triassic). We also found extensive expansion of olfactory receptor genes in these turtles. Embryonic gene expression analysis identified an hourglass-like divergence of turtle and chicken embryogenesis, with maximal conservation around the vertebrate phylotypic period, rather than at later stages that show the amniote-common pattern. Wnt5a expression was found in the growth zone of the dorsal shell, supporting the possible co-option of limb-associated Wnt signaling in the acquisition of this turtle-specific novelty. Our results suggest that turtle evolution was accompanied by an unexpectedly conservative vertebrate phylotypic period, followed by turtle-specific repatterning of development to yield the novel structure of the shell.
ESTHER : Wang_2013_Nat.Genet_45_701
PubMedSearch : Wang_2013_Nat.Genet_45_701
PubMedID: 23624526
Gene_locus related to this paper: chemy-m7c042 , chemy-m7bp40 , chemy-m7cgq9 , chemy-m7bs15 , chemy-m7c0b2 , chemy-m7bkv2 , chemy-m7bnk5 , chemy-m7bzy6

Title : The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation - Zhang_2012_Nature_490_49
Author(s) : Zhang G , Fang X , Guo X , Li L , Luo R , Xu F , Yang P , Zhang L , Wang X , Qi H , Xiong Z , Que H , Xie Y , Holland PW , Paps J , Zhu Y , Wu F , Chen Y , Wang J , Peng C , Meng J , Yang L , Liu J , Wen B , Zhang N , Huang Z , Zhu Q , Feng Y , Mount A , Hedgecock D , Xu Z , Liu Y , Domazet-Loso T , Du Y , Sun X , Zhang S , Liu B , Cheng P , Jiang X , Li J , Fan D , Wang W , Fu W , Wang T , Wang B , Zhang J , Peng Z , Li Y , Li N , Chen M , He Y , Tan F , Song X , Zheng Q , Huang R , Yang H , Du X , Chen L , Yang M , Gaffney PM , Wang S , Luo L , She Z , Ming Y , Huang W , Huang B , Zhang Y , Qu T , Ni P , Miao G , Wang Q , Steinberg CE , Wang H , Qian L , Liu X , Yin Y
Ref : Nature , 490 :49 , 2012
Abstract : The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.
ESTHER : Zhang_2012_Nature_490_49
PubMedSearch : Zhang_2012_Nature_490_49
PubMedID: 22992520
Gene_locus related to this paper: cragi-k1qzk7 , cragi-k1rad0 , cragi-k1p6v9 , cragi-k1pa46 , cragi-k1pga2 , cragi-k1pp63 , cragi-k1pwa8 , cragi-k1q0b1.1 , cragi-k1q0b1.2 , cragi-k1q1h2 , cragi-k1q2z6 , cragi-k1qaj8 , cragi-k1qaw5 , cragi-k1qhl5 , cragi-k1qly1 , cragi-k1qqb1.1 , cragi-k1qqb1.2 , cragi-k1qs61 , cragi-k1qs99 , cragi-k1qwl6 , cragi-k1r068 , cragi-k1r0n3.1 , cragi-k1r0n3.2 , cragi-k1r0r4 , cragi-k1r1i9 , cragi-k1r8q9 , cragi-k1rgi1 , cragi-k1rig4 , cragi-k1s0a7.1 , cragi-k1s0a7.2 , cragi-k1s0a7.3 , cragi-k1q6q0 , cragi-k1rru1 , cragi-k1qfi4 , cragi-k1qvm5 , cragi-k1qq58 , cragi-k1qdc0 , cragi-k1r754 , cragi-k1pje5 , cragi-k1qca6 , cragi-k1qdt5 , cragi-k1qkz7 , cragi-k1rgd2 , cragi-k1puh6 , cragi-k1raz4 , cragi-k1qqj4 , cragi-k1rbs1