Qin G

References (8)

Title : Eco-friendly and efficient extraction of polyphenols from Ligustrum robustum by deep eutectic solvent assisted ultrasound - Qin_2023_Food.Chem_429_136828
Author(s) : Qin G , Zhang F , Ren M , Chen X , Liu C , Li G , Gao Q , Qiao L , Jiang Y , Zhu L , Guo Y , Wang G
Ref : Food Chem , 429 :136828 , 2023
Abstract : An eco-friendly and efficient extraction method using deep eutectic solvents assisted ultrasound extraction (DESs-UAE) for the polyphenols from Ligustrum robustum was developed. Among the 34 kinds of DESs prepared, tetraethyl ammonium bromide: 1,2,4-butanol (Teab: 1,2,4-But) was proved to be a suitable extraction solvent based on the extraction efficiency. The extraction parameters including temperature, water content, liquid-solid ratio were optimized with response surface methodology (RSM). Under the optimal conditions, the total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were 101.46 +/- 2.96 mg GAE/g DW and 264.17 +/- 5.39 mg RE/g DW, respectively. Furthermore, the extraction mechanism of DESs-UAE was investigated by extraction kinetics, molecular dynamic simulation and theory calculations of interaction. In particular, 9 kinds of polyphenols compounds from Ligustrum robustum were firstly identified by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Moreover, the recovered polyphenols exhibited significant antioxidant, alpha-glucosidase inhibition, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and anticancer activity.
ESTHER : Qin_2023_Food.Chem_429_136828
PubMedSearch : Qin_2023_Food.Chem_429_136828
PubMedID: 37478601

Title : Lonicera japonica polysaccharides alleviate D-galactose-induced oxidative stress and restore gut microbiota in ICR mice - Sun_2023_Int.J.Biol.Macromol__125517
Author(s) : Sun W , Zhu J , Qin G , Huang Y , Cheng S , Chen Z , Zhang Y , Shu Y , Zeng X , Guo R
Ref : Int J Biol Macromol , :125517 , 2023
Abstract : Lonicera japonica polysaccharides (LJPs) exhibit anti-aging effect in nematodes. Here, we further studied the function of LJPs on aging-related disorders in D-galactose (D-gal)-induced ICR mice. Four groups of mice including the control group, the D-gal-treated group, the intervening groups with low and high dose of LJPs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) were raised for 8 weeks. The results showed that intragastric administration with LJPs improved the organ indexes of D-gal-treated mice. Moreover, LJPs improved the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) as well as glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and decreasing the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in serum, liver and brain. Meanwhile, LJPs restored the content of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain. Further, LJPs reversed the liver tissue damages in aging mice. Mechanistically, LJPs alleviate oxidative stress at least partially through regulating Nrf2 signaling. Additionally, LJPs restored the gut microbiota composition of D-gal-treated mice by adjusting the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio at the phylum level and upregulating the relative abundances of Lactobacillaceae and Bifidobacteriacesa. Notably, the KEGG pathways involved in hazardous substances degradation and flavone and flavonol biosynthesis were significantly enhanced by LJPs treatment. Overall, our study uncovers the role of LJPs in modulating oxidative stress and gut microbiota in the D-gal-induced aging mice.
ESTHER : Sun_2023_Int.J.Biol.Macromol__125517
PubMedSearch : Sun_2023_Int.J.Biol.Macromol__125517
PubMedID: 37353132

Title : GAPT regulates cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the brains of learning and memory impairment mice induced by scopolamine - Liu_2020_Brain.Behav__e01602
Author(s) : Liu Z , Qin G , Mana L , Dong Y , Huang S , Wang Y , Wu Y , Shi J , Tian J , Wang P
Ref : Brain Behav , :e01602 , 2020
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress are the crucial mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). GAPT, also called GEPT (a combination of several active components extracted from the Chinese herbs ginseng, epimedium, polygala and tuber curcumae) or Jinsiwei, is a patented Chinese herbal compound, has been clinically widely used to improve learning and memory impairment, but whether it can play a neuroprotective role by protecting cholinergic neurons and reducing oxidative stress injury remains unclear. METHODS: Male ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with scopolamine (3 mg/kg) to establish a learning and memory disordered model. An LC-MS method was established to study the chemical compounds and in vivo metabolites of GAPT. After scopolamine injection, a step-down passive-avoidance test (SDPA) and a Y maze test were used to estimate learning ability and cognitive function. In addition, ELISA detected the enzymatic activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), acetylcholine (ACh), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD). The protein expressions of AChE, ChAT, SOD1, and GPX1 were observed by western blot, and the distribution of ChAT, SOD1, and GPX1 was observed by immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: After one-half or 1 month of intragastric administration, GAPT can ameliorate scopolamine-induced behavioral changes in learning and memory impaired mice. It can also decrease the activity of MDA and protein expression level of AChE, increase the activity of Ach, and increase activity and protein expression level of ChAT, SOD, and GPX in scopolamine-treated mice. After one and a half month of intragastric administration of GAPT, echinacoside, salvianolic acid A, ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg2, pachymic acid, and beta asarone could be absorbed into mice blood and pass through BBB. CONCLUSIONS: GAPT can improve the learning and memory ability of scopolamine-induced mice, and its mechanism may be related to protecting cholinergic neurons and reducing oxidative stress injury.
ESTHER : Liu_2020_Brain.Behav__e01602
PubMedSearch : Liu_2020_Brain.Behav__e01602
PubMedID: 32174034

Title : Efficacy and safety of DBPR108 monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial - Wang_2020_Curr.Med.Res.Opin_36_1107
Author(s) : Wang W , Yao J , Guo X , Guo Y , Yan C , Liu K , Zhang Y , Wang X , Li H , Wen Z , Li S , Xiao X , Liu W , Li Z , Zhang L , Shao S , Ye S , Qin G , Li Y , Li F , Zhang X , Li X , Peng Y , Deng H , Xu X , Zhou L , Huang Y , Cao M , Xia X , Shi M , Dou J , Yuan J
Ref : Curr Med Res Opin , 36 :1107 , 2020
Abstract : Objective: DBPR108, a novel dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitor, has shown great antihyperglycemic effect in animal models. This study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DBPR108 monotherapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).Methods: This was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial. The newly diagnosed or inadequately controlled untreated T2DM patients were randomized to receive 50, 100, 200 mg DBPR108 or placebo in a ratio of 1:1:1:1. The primary efficacy outcome was HbA1c change from baseline to week 12. Relevant secondary efficacy parameters and safety were assessed. The clinical trial registration is NCT04124484.Results: Overall, 271 of the 276 randomized patients, who received 50 mg (n = 68), 100 mg (n = 67), 200 mg (n = 69) DBPR108 or placebo (n = 67), were included in full analysis set. At week 12, HbA1c change from baseline was -0.04 +/- 0.77 in placebo group, -0.51 +/- 0.71, -0.75 +/- 0.73, and -0.57 +/- 0.78 (%, p < .001 vs. placebo) in 50, 100, and 200 mg DBPR108 groups, respectively. Since week 4, DBPR108 monotherapy resulted in significant improvements in secondary efficacy parameters. At end of 12-week treatment, the goal of HbA1c >=7% was achieved in 29.85, 58.82, 55.22, and 47.83% of the patients in placebo, 50, 100, and 200 mg DBPR108 groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events did not show significant difference between DBPR108 and placebo except mild hypoglycemia in DBPR108 200 mg group.Conclusions: The study results support DBPR108 100 mg once daily as the primary dosing regimen for T2DM patients in phase III development program.
ESTHER : Wang_2020_Curr.Med.Res.Opin_36_1107
PubMedSearch : Wang_2020_Curr.Med.Res.Opin_36_1107
PubMedID: 32338063

Title : The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genome and the genomics of punicalagin biosynthesis - Qin_2017_Plant.J_91_1108
Author(s) : Qin G , Xu C , Ming R , Tang H , Guyot R , Kramer EM , Hu Y , Yi X , Qi Y , Xu X , Gao Z , Pan H , Jian J , Tian Y , Yue Z , Xu Y
Ref : Plant J , 91 :1108 , 2017
Abstract : Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a perennial fruit crop grown since ancient times that has been planted worldwide and is known for its functional metabolites, particularly punicalagins. We have sequenced and assembled the pomegranate genome with 328 Mb anchored into nine pseudo-chromosomes and annotated 29 229 gene models. A Myrtales lineage-specific whole-genome duplication event was detected that occurred in the common ancestor before the divergence of pomegranate and Eucalyptus. Repetitive sequences accounted for 46.1% of the assembled genome. We found that the integument development gene INNER NO OUTER (INO) was under positive selection and potentially contributed to the development of the fleshy outer layer of the seed coat, an edible part of pomegranate fruit. The genes encoding the enzymes for synthesis and degradation of lignin, hemicelluloses and cellulose were also differentially expressed between soft- and hard-seeded varieties, reflecting differences in their accumulation in cultivars differing in seed hardness. Candidate genes for punicalagin biosynthesis were identified and their expression patterns indicated that gallic acid synthesis in tissues could follow different biochemical pathways. The genome sequence of pomegranate provides a valuable resource for the dissection of many biological and biochemical traits and also provides important insights for the acceleration of breeding. Elucidation of the biochemical pathway(s) involved in punicalagin biosynthesis could assist breeding efforts to increase production of this bioactive compound.
ESTHER : Qin_2017_Plant.J_91_1108
PubMedSearch : Qin_2017_Plant.J_91_1108
PubMedID: 28654223
Gene_locus related to this paper: prupe-a0a251r634 , pungr-a0a218xv87 , pungr-a0a218xi98 , pungr-a0a218wma5 , pungr-a0a218w0a8 , pungr-a0a218w138 , pungr-a0a218w7t6 , pungr-a0a218weu3 , pungr-a0a218xzu6

Title : Relaxant action of plumula nelumbinis extract on mouse airway smooth muscle - Tan_2015_Evid.Based.Complement.Alternat.Med_2015_523640
Author(s) : Tan L , Chen W , Wei MY , Shen J , Yu MF , Yang G , Guo D , Qin G , Ji G , Liu QH
Ref : Evid Based Complement Alternat Med , 2015 :523640 , 2015
Abstract : The traditional herb Plumula Nelumbinis is widely used in the world because it has many biological activities, such as anti-inflammation, antioxidant, antihypertension, and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition. However, the action of Plumula Nelumbinis on airway smooth muscle (ASM) relaxation has not been investigated. A chloroform extract of Plumula Nelumbinis (CEPN) was prepared, which completely inhibited precontraction induced by high K(+) in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse tracheal rings, but it had no effect on resting tension. CEPN also blocked voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel- (VDCC-) mediated currents. In addition, ACh-induced precontraction was also completely blocked by CEPN and partially inhibited by nifedipine or pyrazole 3. Besides, CEPN partially reduced ACh-activated nonselective cation channel (NSCC) currents. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CEPN blocked VDCC and NSCC to inhibit Ca(2+) influx, resulting in relaxation of precontracted ASM. This finding indicates that CEPN would be a candidate of new potent bronchodilators.
ESTHER : Tan_2015_Evid.Based.Complement.Alternat.Med_2015_523640
PubMedSearch : Tan_2015_Evid.Based.Complement.Alternat.Med_2015_523640
PubMedID: 25763092

Title : Effects of environmentally realistic daily temperature variation on pesticide toxicity to aquatic invertebrates - Willming_2013_Environ.Toxicol.Chem_32_2738
Author(s) : Willming MM , Qin G , Maul JD
Ref : Environ Toxicol Chem , 32 :2738 , 2013
Abstract : The toxicity of several agricultural chemicals to aquatic invertebrates has been shown to be temperature-dependent, but the role of daily temperature variation has rarely been examined. The authors simulated a natural daily temperature pattern (a fluctuating cycle of 21 degrees C to 31 degrees C over a 24-h period) based on field-collected data from Southern High Plains wetlands (TX, USA) and conducted a series of experiments comparing responses from this exposure scenario to a constant exposure at 24 +/- 1 degrees C. Results indicate alterations in pesticide toxicity under the fluctuating temperature regime compared with that of the constant temperature exposure. There was a significant interaction of temperature regime and bifenthrin on Chironomus dilutus survival, and C. dilutus ash-free dry mass was lower in the fluctuating temperature treatment. The 10-d median lethal concentration (LC50) for Hyalella azteca exposed to chlorothalonil was lower under the fluctuating temperature regime compared with the constant temperature regime. For Daphnia magna exposed to malathion, the main effects of temperature regime and malathion were observed on cholinesterase activity. The present study demonstrates how environmentally relevant daily temperature variation influences contaminant effects on aquatic invertebrates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:2738-2745. (c) 2013 SETAC.
ESTHER : Willming_2013_Environ.Toxicol.Chem_32_2738
PubMedSearch : Willming_2013_Environ.Toxicol.Chem_32_2738
PubMedID: 23955707

Title : Long route or shortcut? A molecular dynamics study of traffic of thiocholine within the active-site gorge of acetylcholinesterase - Xu_2010_Biophys.J_99_4003
Author(s) : Xu Y , Colletier JP , Weik M , Qin G , Jiang H , Silman I , Sussman JL
Ref : Biophysical Journal , 99 :4003 , 2010
Abstract : The principal role of acetylcholinesterase is termination of nerve impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses, by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to acetate and choline. Its active site is buried at the bottom of a deep and narrow gorge, at the rim of which is found a second anionic site, the peripheral anionic site. The fact that the active site is so deeply buried has raised cogent questions as to how rapid traffic of substrate and products occurs in such a confined environment. Various theoretical and experimental approaches have been used to solve this problem. Here, multiple conventional molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the clearance of the product, thiocholine, from the active-site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Our results indicate that thiocholine is released from the peripheral anionic site via random pathways, while three exit routes appear to be favored for its release from the active site, namely, along the axis of the active-site gorge, and through putative back- and side-doors. The back-door pathway is that via which thiocholine exits most frequently. Our results are in good agreement with kinetic and kinetic-crystallography studies. We propose the use of multiple molecular dynamics simulations as a fast yet accurate complementary tool in structural studies of enzymatic trafficking.
ESTHER : Xu_2010_Biophys.J_99_4003
PubMedSearch : Xu_2010_Biophys.J_99_4003
PubMedID: 21156143