Varga J

References (5)

Title : Aspergillus luchuensis, an industrially important black Aspergillus in East Asia - Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
Author(s) : Hong SB , Lee M , Kim DH , Varga J , Frisvad JC , Perrone G , Gomi K , Yamada O , Machida M , Houbraken J , Samson RA
Ref : PLoS ONE , 8 :e63769 , 2013
Abstract : Aspergilli known as black- and white-koji molds which are used for awamori, shochu, makgeolli and other food and beverage fermentations, are reported in the literature as A. luchuensis, A. awamori, A. kawachii, or A. acidus. In order to elucidate the taxonomic position of these species, available ex-type cultures were compared based on morphology and molecular characters. A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus showed the same banding patterns in RAPD, and the three species had the same rDNA-ITS, beta-tubulin and calmodulin sequences and these differed from those of the closely related A. niger and A. tubingensis. Morphologically, the three species are not significantly different from each other or from A. niger and A. tubingensis. It is concluded that A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus are the same species, and A. luchuensis is selected as the correct name based on priority. Strains of A. awamori which are stored in National Research Institute of Brewing in Japan, represent A. niger (n = 14) and A. luchuensis (n = 6). The neotype of A. awamori (CBS 557.65 = NRRL 4948) does not originate from awamori fermentation and it is shown to be identical with the unknown taxon Aspergillus welwitschiae. Extrolite analysis of strains of A. luchuensis showed that they do not produce mycotoxins and therefore can be considered safe for food and beverage fermentations. A. luchuensis is also frequently isolated from meju and nuruk in Korea and Puerh tea in China and the species is probably common in the fermentation environment of East Asia. A re-description of A. luchuensis is provided because the incomplete data in the original literature.
ESTHER : Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
PubMedSearch : Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
PubMedID: 23723998
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspaw-AXE1

Title : Monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-induced changes in plasma corticosterone levels, anxiety and locomotor activity in male CD1 mice - Aliczki_2013_Horm.Behav_63_752
Author(s) : Aliczki M , Zelena D , Mikics E , Varga ZK , Pinter O , Bakos NV , Varga J , Haller J
Ref : Horm Behav , 63 :752 , 2013
Abstract : The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis is strongly controlled by the endocannabinoid system. The specific impact of enhanced 2-arachidonoylglycerol signaling on corticosterone plasma levels, however, was not investigated so far. Here we studied the effects of the recently developed monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 on basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels in male CD1 mice, and found that this compound dramatically increased basal levels without affecting stress responses. Since acute changes in corticosterone levels can affect behavior, JZL184 was administered concurrently with the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, to investigate whether the previously shown behavioral effects of JZL184 are dependent on corticosterone. We found that in the elevated plus-maze, the effects of JZL184 on "classical" anxiety-related measures were abolished by corticosterone synthesis blockade. By contrast, effects on the "ethological" measures of anxiety (i.e. risk assessment) were not affected by metyrapone. In the open-field, the locomotion-enhancing effects of the compound were not changed either. These findings show that monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition dramatically increases basal levels of corticosterone. This endocrine effect partly affects the anxiolytic, but not the locomotion-enhancing effects of monoacylglycerol lipase blockade.
ESTHER : Aliczki_2013_Horm.Behav_63_752
PubMedSearch : Aliczki_2013_Horm.Behav_63_752
PubMedID: 23578952

Title : Genome sequencing and analysis of the versatile cell factory Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88 - Pel_2007_Nat.Biotechnol_25_221
Author(s) : Pel HJ , de Winde JH , Archer DB , Dyer PS , Hofmann G , Schaap PJ , Turner G , de Vries RP , Albang R , Albermann K , Andersen MR , Bendtsen JD , Benen JA , van den Berg M , Breestraat S , Caddick MX , Contreras R , Cornell M , Coutinho PM , Danchin EG , Debets AJ , Dekker P , van Dijck PW , van Dijk A , Dijkhuizen L , Driessen AJ , d'Enfert C , Geysens S , Goosen C , Groot GS , de Groot PW , Guillemette T , Henrissat B , Herweijer M , van den Hombergh JP , van den Hondel CA , van der Heijden RT , van der Kaaij RM , Klis FM , Kools HJ , Kubicek CP , van Kuyk PA , Lauber J , Lu X , van der Maarel MJ , Meulenberg R , Menke H , Mortimer MA , Nielsen J , Oliver SG , Olsthoorn M , Pal K , van Peij NN , Ram AF , Rinas U , Roubos JA , Sagt CM , Schmoll M , Sun J , Ussery D , Varga J , Vervecken W , van de Vondervoort PJ , Wedler H , Wosten HA , Zeng AP , van Ooyen AJ , Visser J , Stam H
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 25 :221 , 2007
Abstract : The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid. We sequenced the 33.9-megabase genome of A. niger CBS 513.88, the ancestor of currently used enzyme production strains. A high level of synteny was observed with other aspergilli sequenced. Strong function predictions were made for 6,506 of the 14,165 open reading frames identified. A detailed description of the components of the protein secretion pathway was made and striking differences in the hydrolytic enzyme spectra of aspergilli were observed. A reconstructed metabolic network comprising 1,069 unique reactions illustrates the versatile metabolism of A. niger. Noteworthy is the large number of major facilitator superfamily transporters and fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors, and the presence of putative gene clusters for fumonisin and ochratoxin A synthesis.
ESTHER : Pel_2007_Nat.Biotechnol_25_221
PubMedSearch : Pel_2007_Nat.Biotechnol_25_221
PubMedID: 17259976
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspna-g3yal2 , aspnc-a2q8r7 , aspnc-a2q814 , aspnc-a2qb93 , aspnc-a2qbd3 , aspnc-a2qbh3 , aspnc-a2qbx7 , aspnc-a2qdj6 , aspnc-a2qe77 , aspnc-a2qf54 , aspnc-a2qfe9 , aspnc-a2qg33 , aspnc-a2qgj6 , aspnc-a2qgm6 , aspnc-a2qh52 , aspnc-a2qh76 , aspnc-a2qh85 , aspnc-a2qhe2 , aspnc-a2qi32 , aspnc-a2qib2 , aspnc-a2qk14 , aspnc-a2ql23 , aspnc-a2ql89 , aspnc-a2ql90 , aspnc-a2qla0 , aspnc-a2qlz0 , aspnc-a2qm14 , aspnc-a2qmk5 , aspnc-a2qms0 , aspnc-a2qn29 , aspnc-a2qn56 , aspnc-a2qn70 , aspnc-a2qnw9 , aspnc-a2qr21 , aspnc-a2qs22 , aspnc-a2qt50 , aspnc-a2qti9 , aspnc-a2qtz0 , aspnc-a2quc1 , aspnc-a2qw06 , aspnc-a2qwz6 , aspnc-a2qx92 , aspnc-a2qyf0 , aspnc-a2qys7 , aspnc-a2qz72 , aspnc-a2qzn6 , aspnc-a2qzr0 , aspnc-a2qzs1 , aspnc-a2qzx0 , aspnc-a2qzx4 , aspnc-a2r0p4 , aspnc-a2r0u0 , aspnc-a2r1p3 , aspnc-a2r1r5 , aspnc-a2r2i5 , aspnc-a2r2l0 , aspnc-a2r3s8 , aspnc-a2r4c0 , aspnc-a2r4j8 , aspnc-a2r5r4 , aspnc-a2r6g3 , aspnc-a2r6h5 , aspnc-a2r6h8 , aspnc-a2r7q1 , aspnc-a2r8r3 , aspnc-a2r8z3 , aspnc-a2r9y8 , aspnc-a2r032 , aspnc-a2r040 , aspnc-a2r273 , aspnc-a2r496 , aspnc-a2r502 , aspnc-a2ra07 , aspnc-a2rap4 , aspnc-a2raq2 , aspnc-a2rav1 , aspnc-a5aaf4 , aspnc-a5ab63 , aspnc-a5abc6 , aspnc-a5abe5 , aspnc-a5abe8 , aspnc-a5abf0 , aspnc-a5abh9 , aspnc-a5abk1 , aspnc-a5abt2 , aspnc-a5abz1 , aspnc-atg15 , aspnc-axe1 , aspnc-cuti1 , aspnc-cuti2 , aspnc-faec , aspng-a2q8w0 , aspng-a2qs46 , aspng-a2qst4 , aspng-a2qv27 , aspng-a2qzk9 , aspng-a2r0p8 , aspng-a2r225 , aspng-DAPB , aspng-DPP5 , aspng-faeb , aspni-APSC , aspni-EstA , aspni-FAEA , aspni-PAPA , aspkw-g7y0v7 , aspnc-a2qt47 , aspnc-a2qt66 , aspnc-a2r199 , aspnc-a2r871 , aspnc-a2qbp6 , aspnc-a2qqa1 , aspnc-a2qt70 , aspna-g3y5a6 , aspna-g3xpw9 , aspnc-a2qw57 , aspaw-a0a401kcz4 , aspna-alba , aspnc-kex1 , aspnc-cbpya , aspnc-a2qbg8

Title : Skewed genomic variability in strains of the toxigenic bacterial pathogen, Clostridium perfringens - Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
Author(s) : Myers GS , Rasko DA , Cheung JK , Ravel J , Seshadri R , DeBoy RT , Ren Q , Varga J , Awad MM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Rosovitz MJ , Sullivan SA , Khouri H , Dimitrov GI , Watkins KL , Mulligan S , Benton J , Radune D , Fisher DJ , Atkins HS , Hiscox T , Jost BH , Billington SJ , Songer JG , McClane BA , Titball RW , Rood JI , Melville SB , Paulsen IT
Ref : Genome Res , 16 :1031 , 2006
Abstract : Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore-forming bacterium commonly found in soil, sediments, and the human gastrointestinal tract. C. perfringens is responsible for a wide spectrum of disease, including food poisoning, gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), enteritis necroticans, and non-foodborne gastrointestinal infections. The complete genome sequences of Clostridium perfringens strain ATCC 13124, a gas gangrene isolate and the species type strain, and the enterotoxin-producing food poisoning strain SM101, were determined and compared with the published C. perfringens strain 13 genome. Comparison of the three genomes revealed considerable genomic diversity with >300 unique "genomic islands" identified, with the majority of these islands unusually clustered on one replichore. PCR-based analysis indicated that the large genomic islands are widely variable across a large collection of C. perfringens strains. These islands encode genes that correlate to differences in virulence and phenotypic characteristics of these strains. Significant differences between the strains include numerous novel mobile elements and genes encoding metabolic capabilities, strain-specific extracellular polysaccharide capsule, sporulation factors, toxins, and other secreted enzymes, providing substantial insight into this medically important bacterial pathogen.
ESTHER : Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
PubMedSearch : Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
PubMedID: 16825665
Gene_locus related to this paper: clope-CPE0307 , clope-CPE0432 , clope-CPE1581 , clope-CPE1596 , clope-CPE1989 , clope-CPE2231 , clope-lipa , clope-LIPB , clope-PLDB

Title : Efficient degradation of tannic acid by black Aspergillus species - Van Diepeningen_2004_Mycol.Res_108_919
Author(s) : Van Diepeningen AD , Debets AJ , Varga J , van der Gaag M , Swart K , Hoekstra RF
Ref : Mycol Res , 108 :919 , 2004
Abstract : A set of aspergillus strains from culture collections and wild-type black aspergilli isolated on non-selective media were used to validate the use of media with 20% tannic acid for exclusive and complete selection of the black aspergilli. The 20% tannic acid medium proved useful for both quantitative and qualitative selection of all different black aspergilli, including all recognized species: A. carbonarius, A. japonicus, A. aculeatus, A foetidus, A. heteromorphus, A. niger, A. tubingensis and A. brasiliensis haplotypes. Even higher concentrations of tannic acid can be utilized by the black aspergilli suggesting a very efficient tannic acid-degrading system. Colour mutants show that the characteristic ability to grow on high tannic acid concentrations is not causally linked to the other typical feature of these aspergilli, i.e. the formation of brown-black pigments. Sequence analysis of the A. niger genome using the A. oryzae tannase gene yielded eleven tannase-like genes, far more than in related species. Therefore, a unique ecological niche in the degradation of tannic acid and connected nitrogen release seems to be reserved for these black-spored cosmopolitans.
ESTHER : Van Diepeningen_2004_Mycol.Res_108_919
PubMedSearch : Van Diepeningen_2004_Mycol.Res_108_919
PubMedID: 15449597