Rasko DA

References (18)

Title : Whole-genome assembly of Klebsiella pneumoniae coproducing NDM-1 and OXA-232 carbapenemases using single-molecule, real-time sequencing - Doi_2014_Antimicrob.Agents.Chemother_58_5947
Author(s) : Doi Y , Hazen TH , Boitano M , Tsai YC , Clark TA , Korlach J , Rasko DA
Ref : Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy , 58 :5947 , 2014
Abstract : The whole-genome sequence of a carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, PittNDM01, which coproduces NDM-1 and OXA-232 carbapenemases, was determined in this study. The use of single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing provided a closed genome in a single sequencing run. K. pneumoniae PittNDM01 has a single chromosome of 5,348,284 bp and four plasmids: pPKPN1 (283,371 bp), pPKPN2 (103,694 bp), pPKPN3 (70,814 bp), and pPKPN4 (6,141 bp). The contents of the chromosome were similar to that of the K. pneumoniae reference genome strain MGH 78578, with the exception of a large inversion spanning 23.3% of the chromosome. In contrast, three of the four plasmids are unique. The plasmid pPKPN1, an IncHI1B-like plasmid, carries the blaNDM-1, armA, and qnrB1 genes, along with tellurium and mercury resistance operons. blaNDM-1 is carried on a unique structure in which Tn125 is further bracketed by IS26 downstream of a class 1 integron. The IncFIA-like plasmid pPKPN3 also carries an array of resistance elements, including blaCTX-M-15 and a mercury resistance operon. The ColE-type plasmid pPKPN4 carrying blaOXA-232 is identical to a plasmid previously reported from France. SMRT sequencing was useful in resolving the complex bacterial genomic structures in the de novo assemblies.
ESTHER : Doi_2014_Antimicrob.Agents.Chemother_58_5947
PubMedSearch : Doi_2014_Antimicrob.Agents.Chemother_58_5947
PubMedID: 25070096

Title : Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain 2886-75, Associated with the First Reported Case of Human Infection in the United States - Sanjar_2014_Genome.Announc_2_e01120
Author(s) : Sanjar F , Hazen TH , Shah SM , Koenig SS , Agrawal S , Daugherty S , Sadzewicz L , Tallon LJ , Mammel MK , Feng P , Soderlund R , Tarr PI , Debroy C , Dudley EG , Cebula TA , Ravel J , Fraser CM , Rasko DA , Eppinger M
Ref : Genome Announc , 2 : , 2014
Abstract : First identified in 1982 as a human pathogen, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli of the O157:H7 serotype is a major cause of food-borne acquired human infections. Here, we report the genome sequence of the first known strain of this serotype isolated in the United States.
ESTHER : Sanjar_2014_Genome.Announc_2_e01120
PubMedSearch : Sanjar_2014_Genome.Announc_2_e01120
PubMedID: 24407635
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-fes , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-ypt1 , ecoli-yqia , ecoli-Z1930

Title : Draft genome sequence of Vibrio fischeri SR5, a strain isolated from the light organ of the Mediterranean squid Sepiola robusta - Gyllborg_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_1639
Author(s) : Gyllborg MC , Sahl JW , Cronin DC, 3rd , Rasko DA , Mandel MJ
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :1639 , 2012
Abstract : Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Vibrio fischeri SR5, a squid symbiotic isolate from Sepiola robusta in the Mediterranean Sea. This 4.3-Mbp genome sequence represents the first V. fischeri genome from an S. robusta symbiont and the first from outside the Pacific Ocean.
ESTHER : Gyllborg_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_1639
PubMedSearch : Gyllborg_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_1639
PubMedID: 22374964
Gene_locus related to this paper: vibf1-q5e481 , alifs-h1r1i6

Title : Whole-genome sequences of Bacillus subtilis and close relatives - Earl_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_2378
Author(s) : Earl AM , Eppinger M , Fricke WF , Rosovitz MJ , Rasko DA , Daugherty S , Losick R , Kolter R , Ravel J
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :2378 , 2012
Abstract : We sequenced four strains of Bacillus subtilis and the type strains for two closely related species, Bacillus vallismortis and Bacillus mojavensis. We report the high-quality Sanger genome sequences of B. subtilis subspecies subtilis RO-NN-1 and AUSI98, B. subtilis subspecies spizizenii TU-B-10(T) and DV1-B-1, Bacillus mojavensis RO-H-1(T), and Bacillus vallismortis DV1-F-3(T).
ESTHER : Earl_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_2378
PubMedSearch : Earl_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_2378
PubMedID: 22493193
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacsu-YBAC , bacsu-ytxm , bacsu-YVAK

Title : Draft genome sequences of the diarrheagenic Escherichia coli collection - Hazen_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3026
Author(s) : Hazen TH , Sahl JW , Redman JC , Morris CR , Daugherty SC , Chibucos MC , Sengamalay NA , Fraser-Liggett CM , Steinsland H , Whittam TS , Whittam B , Manning SD , Rasko DA
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 194 :3026 , 2012
Abstract : We report the draft genome sequences of the collection referred to as the Escherichia coli DECA collection, which was assembled to contain representative isolates of the 15 most common diarrheagenic clones in humans (http:\/\/shigatox.net/new/). These genomes represent a valuable resource to the community of researchers who examine these enteric pathogens.
ESTHER : Hazen_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3026
PubMedSearch : Hazen_2012_J.Bacteriol_194_3026
PubMedID: 22582382
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-d7xp23 , ecoli-fes , ecoli-MCMK , ecoli-yaim , ecoli-ybff , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-YFBB , ecoli-yhet , ecoli-yiel , ecoli-ypt1 , ecoli-yqia , ecoli-Z1341 , ecoli-Z1930 , ecoli-YfhR

Title : Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany - Rasko_2011_N.Engl.J.Med_365_709
Author(s) : Rasko DA , Webster DR , Sahl JW , Bashir A , Boisen N , Scheutz F , Paxinos EE , Sebra R , Chin CS , Iliopoulos D , Klammer A , Peluso P , Lee L , Kislyuk AO , Bullard J , Kasarskis A , Wang S , Eid J , Rank D , Redman JC , Steyert SR , Frimodt-Moller J , Struve C , Petersen AM , Krogfelt KA , Nataro JP , Schadt EE , Waldor MK
Ref : N Engl J Med , 365 :709 , 2011
Abstract : BACKGROUND: A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli.
METHODS: We used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the complete genome sequence of the German outbreak strain, as well as the genome sequences of seven diarrhea-associated enteroaggregative E. coli serotype O104:H4 strains from Africa and four enteroaggregative E. coli reference strains belonging to other serotypes. Genomewide comparisons were performed with the use of these enteroaggregative E. coli genomes, as well as those of 40 previously sequenced E. coli isolates.
RESULTS: The enteroaggregative E. coli O104:H4 strains are closely related and form a distinct clade among E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli strains. However, the genome of the German outbreak strain can be distinguished from those of other O104:H4 strains because it contains a prophage encoding Shiga toxin 2 and a distinct set of additional virulence and antibiotic-resistance factors.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga-toxin-producing enteroaggregative E. coli O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak. More broadly, these findings highlight the way in which the plasticity of bacterial genomes facilitates the emergence of new pathogens.
ESTHER : Rasko_2011_N.Engl.J.Med_365_709
PubMedSearch : Rasko_2011_N.Engl.J.Med_365_709
PubMedID: 21793740
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-fes , ecoli-MCMK , ecoli-yaim , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-YFBB , ecoli-yiel , ecoli-yqia

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative metabolic profiling of the prototypical enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 042 - Chaudhuri_2010_PLoS.One_5_e8801
Author(s) : Chaudhuri RR , Sebaihia M , Hobman JL , Webber MA , Leyton DL , Goldberg MD , Cunningham AF , Scott-Tucker A , Ferguson PR , Thomas CM , Frankel G , Tang CM , Dudley EG , Roberts IS , Rasko DA , Pallen MJ , Parkhill J , Nataro JP , Thomson NR , Henderson IR
Ref : PLoS ONE , 5 :e8801 , 2010
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli can experience a multifaceted life, in some cases acting as a commensal while in other cases causing intestinal and/or extraintestinal disease. Several studies suggest enteroaggregative E. coli are the predominant cause of E. coli-mediated diarrhea in the developed world and are second only to Campylobacter sp. as a cause of bacterial-mediated diarrhea. Furthermore, enteroaggregative E. coli are a predominant cause of persistent diarrhea in the developing world where infection has been associated with malnourishment and growth retardation.
METHODS: In this study we determined the complete genomic sequence of E. coli 042, the prototypical member of the enteroaggregative E. coli, which has been shown to cause disease in volunteer studies. We performed genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other E. coli strains revealing previously uncharacterised virulence factors including a variety of secreted proteins and a capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic locus. In addition, by using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays we have provided a full metabolic profiling of E. coli 042 and the non-pathogenic lab strain E. coli K-12. We have highlighted the genetic basis for many of the metabolic differences between E. coli 042 and E. coli K-12. CONCLUSION: This study provides a genetic context for the vast amount of experimental and epidemiological data published thus far and provides a template for future diagnostic and intervention strategies.
ESTHER : Chaudhuri_2010_PLoS.One_5_e8801
PubMedSearch : Chaudhuri_2010_PLoS.One_5_e8801
PubMedID: 20098708
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-Aes , ecoli-rutD , ecoli-bioh , ecoli-C0410 , ecoli-C2429 , ecoli-dlhh , ecoli-entf , ecoli-fes , ecoli-MCMK , ecoli-mhpc , ecoli-pldb , ecoli-ptrb , ecoli-yafa , ecoli-yaim , ecoli-ybff , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-ycjy , ecoli-yeiG , ecoli-YFBB , ecoli-yhet , ecoli-yjfp , ecoli-YNBC , ecoli-ypfh , ecoli-yqia , ecoli-Z0347 , ecoli-YfhR , yerpe-YBTT

Title : The complete genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames Ancestor - Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
Author(s) : Ravel J , Jiang L , Stanley ST , Wilson MR , Decker RS , Read TD , Worsham P , Keim PS , Salzberg SL , Fraser-Liggett CM , Rasko DA
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 191 :445 , 2009
Abstract : The pathogenic bacterium Bacillus anthracis has become the subject of intense study as a result of its use in a bioterrorism attack in the United States in September and October 2001. Previous studies suggested that B. anthracis Ames Ancestor, the original Ames fully virulent plasmid-containing isolate, was the ideal reference. This study describes the complete genome sequence of that original isolate, derived from a sample kept in cold storage since 1981.
ESTHER : Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
PubMedSearch : Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
PubMedID: 18952800
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-DHBF , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-PHAC , bacan-a0a6l7h3w8

Title : Antimicrobial resistance-conferring plasmids with similarity to virulence plasmids from avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates from poultry - Fricke_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_5963
Author(s) : Fricke WF , McDermott PF , Mammel MK , Zhao S , Johnson TJ , Rasko DA , Fedorka-Cray PJ , Pedroso A , Whichard JM , Leclerc JE , White DG , Cebula TA , Ravel J
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 75 :5963 , 2009
Abstract : Salmonella enterica, a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, may be found in any raw food of animal, vegetable, or fruit origin. Salmonella serovars differ in distribution, virulence, and host specificity. Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky, though often found in the food supply, is less commonly isolated from ill humans. The multidrug-resistant isolate S. Kentucky CVM29188, isolated from a chicken breast sample in 2003, contains three plasmids (146,811 bp, 101,461 bp, and 46,121 bp), two of which carry resistance determinants (pCVM29188_146 [strAB and tetRA] and pCVM29188_101 [bla(CMY-2) and sugE]). Both resistance plasmids were transferable by conjugation, alone or in combination, to S. Kentucky, Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, and Escherichia coli recipients. pCVM29188_146 shares a highly conserved plasmid backbone of 106 kb (>90% nucleotide identity) with two virulence plasmids from avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains (pAPEC-O1-ColBM and pAPEC-O2-ColV). Shared avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) virulence factors include iutA iucABCD, sitABCD, etsABC, iss, and iroBCDEN. PCR analyses of recent (1997 to 2005) S. Kentucky isolates from food animal, retail meat, and human sources revealed that 172 (60%) contained similar APEC-like plasmid backbones. Notably, though rare in human- and cattle-derived isolates, this plasmid backbone was found at a high frequency (50 to 100%) among S. Kentucky isolates from chickens within the same time span. Ninety-four percent of the APEC-positive isolates showed resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin. Together, our findings of a resistance-conferring APEC virulence plasmid in a poultry-derived S. Kentucky isolate and of similar resistance/virulence plasmids in most recent S. Kentucky isolates from chickens and, to lesser degree, from humans and cattle highlight the need for additional research in order to examine the prevalence and spread of combined virulence and resistance plasmids in bacteria in agricultural, environmental, and clinical settings.
ESTHER : Fricke_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_5963
PubMedSearch : Fricke_2009_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_75_5963
PubMedID: 19648374
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-IROD , shidy-q67dv1

Title : The pangenome structure of Escherichia coli: comparative genomic analysis of E. coli commensal and pathogenic isolates - Rasko_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_6881
Author(s) : Rasko DA , Rosovitz MJ , Myers GS , Mongodin EF , Fricke WF , Gajer P , Crabtree J , Sebaihia M , Thomson NR , Chaudhuri R , Henderson IR , Sperandio V , Ravel J
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 190 :6881 , 2008
Abstract : Whole-genome sequencing has been skewed toward bacterial pathogens as a consequence of the prioritization of medical and veterinary diseases. However, it is becoming clear that in order to accurately measure genetic variation within and between pathogenic groups, multiple isolates, as well as commensal species, must be sequenced. This study examined the pangenomic content of Escherichia coli. Six distinct E. coli pathovars can be distinguished using molecular or phenotypic markers, but only two of the six pathovars have been subjected to any genome sequencing previously. Thus, this report provides a seminal description of the genomic contents and unique features of three unsequenced pathovars, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. We also determined the first genome sequence of a human commensal E. coli isolate, E. coli HS, which will undoubtedly provide a new baseline from which workers can examine the evolution of pathogenic E. coli. Comparison of 17 E. coli genomes, 8 of which are new, resulted in identification of approximately 2,200 genes conserved in all isolates. We were also able to identify genes that were isolate and pathovar specific. Fewer pathovar-specific genes were identified than anticipated, suggesting that each isolate may have independently developed virulence capabilities. Pangenome calculations indicate that E. coli genomic diversity represents an open pangenome model containing a reservoir of more than 13,000 genes, many of which may be uncharacterized but important virulence factors. This comparative study of the species E. coli, while descriptive, should provide the basis for future functional work on this important group of pathogens.
ESTHER : Rasko_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_6881
PubMedSearch : Rasko_2008_J.Bacteriol_190_6881
PubMedID: 18676672
Gene_locus related to this paper: ecoli-Aes , ecoli-rutD , ecoli-bioh , ecoli-C4836 , ecoli-dlhh , ecoli-entf , ecoli-fes , ecoli-mhpc , ecoli-pldb , ecoli-ptrb , ecoli-yafa , ecoli-yaim , ecoli-ybff , ecoli-ycfp , ecoli-ycjy , ecoli-yeiG , ecoli-YFBB , ecoli-yghX , ecoli-yhet , ecoli-yiel , ecoli-yjfp , ecoli-YNBC , ecoli-ypfh , ecoli-ypt1 , ecoli-yqia , ecoli-Z2445 , ecoli-YfhR

Title : Complete sequence analysis of novel plasmids from emetic and periodontal Bacillus cereus isolates reveals a common evolutionary history among the B. cereus-group plasmids, including Bacillus anthracis pXO1 - Rasko_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_52
Author(s) : Rasko DA , Rosovitz MJ , Okstad OA , Fouts DE , Jiang L , Cer RZ , Kolsto AB , Gill SR , Ravel J
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 189 :52 , 2007
Abstract : The plasmids of the members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of organisms are essential in defining the phenotypic traits associated with pathogenesis and ecology. For example, Bacillus anthracis contains two plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2, encoding toxin production and encapsulation, respectively, that define this species pathogenic potential, whereas the presence of a Bt toxin-encoding plasmid defines Bacillus thuringiensis isolates. In this study the plasmids from B. cereus isolates that produce emetic toxin or are linked to periodontal disease were sequenced and analyzed. Two periodontal isolates examined contained almost identical approximately 272-kb plasmids, named pPER272. The emetic toxin-producing isolate contained one approximately 270-kb plasmid, named pCER270, encoding the cereulide biosynthesis gene cluster. Comparative sequence analyses of these B. cereus plasmids revealed a high degree of sequence similarity to the B. anthracis pXO1 plasmid, especially in a putative replication region. These plasmids form a newly defined group of pXO1-like plasmids. However, these novel plasmids do not contain the pXO1 pathogenicity island, which in each instance is replaced by plasmid specific DNA. Plasmids pCER270 and pPER272 share regions that are not found in any other pXO1-like plasmids. Evolutionary studies suggest that these plasmids are more closely related to each other than to other identified B. cereus plasmids. Screening of a population of B. cereus group isolates revealed that pXO1-like plasmids are more often found in association with clinical isolates. This study demonstrates that the pXO1-like plasmids may define pathogenic B. cereus isolates in the same way that pXO1 and pXO2 define the B. anthracis species.
ESTHER : Rasko_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_52
PubMedSearch : Rasko_2007_J.Bacteriol_189_52
PubMedID: 17041058
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacce-c2zyv1 , bacce-q20cj0 , bacce-q20cj2 , bacti-q3elq7

Title : The complete genome sequence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP31758, the causative agent of Far East scarlet-like fever - Eppinger_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e142
Author(s) : Eppinger M , Rosovitz MJ , Fricke WF , Rasko DA , Kokorina G , Fayolle C , Lindler LE , Carniel E , Ravel J
Ref : PLoS Genet , 3 :e142 , 2007
Abstract : The first reported Far East scarlet-like fever (FESLF) epidemic swept the Pacific coastal region of Russia in the late 1950s. Symptoms of the severe infection included erythematous skin rash and desquamation, exanthema, hyperhemic tongue, and a toxic shock syndrome. The term FESLF was coined for the infection because it shares clinical presentations with scarlet fever caused by group A streptococci. The causative agent was later identified as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, although the range of morbidities was vastly different from classical pseudotuberculosis symptoms. To understand the origin and emergence of the peculiar clinical features of FESLF, we have sequenced the genome of the FESLF-causing strain Y. pseudotuberculosis IP31758 and compared it with that of another Y. pseudotuberculosis strain, IP32953, which causes classical gastrointestinal symptoms. The unique gene pool of Y pseudotuberculosis IP31758 accounts for more than 260 strain-specific genes and introduces individual physiological capabilities and virulence determinants, with a significant proportion horizontally acquired that likely originated from Enterobacteriaceae and other soil-dwelling bacteria that persist in the same ecological niche. The mobile genome pool includes two novel plasmids phylogenetically unrelated to all currently reported Yersinia plasmids. An icm/dot type IVB secretion system, shared only with the intracellular persisting pathogens of the order Legionellales, was found on the larger plasmid and could contribute to scarlatinoid fever symptoms in patients due to the introduction of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive capabilities. We determined the common and unique traits resulting from genome evolution and speciation within the genus Yersinia and drew a more accurate species border between Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis. In contrast to the lack of genetic diversity observed in the evolutionary young descending Y. pestis lineage, the population genetics of Y. pseudotuberculosis is more heterogenous. Both Y. pseudotuberculosis strains IP31758 and the previously sequenced Y. pseudotuberculosis strain IP32953 have evolved by the acquisition of specific plasmids and by the horizontal acquisition and incorporation of different genetic information into the chromosome, which all together or independently seems to potentially impact the phenotypic adaptation of these two strains.
ESTHER : Eppinger_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e142
PubMedSearch : Eppinger_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e142
PubMedID: 17784789
Gene_locus related to this paper: yerpe-BIOH , yerpe-dlhh , yerpe-PIP , yerpe-PTRB , yerpe-Y0507 , yerpe-y1616 , yerpe-y3224 , yerpe-YPLA , yerpe-YPO0180 , yerpe-YPO0667 , yerpe-YPO0773 , yerpe-YPO0986 , yerpe-YPO1501 , yerpe-YPO1997 , yerpe-YPO2526 , yerpe-YPO2814

Title : Skewed genomic variability in strains of the toxigenic bacterial pathogen, Clostridium perfringens - Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
Author(s) : Myers GS , Rasko DA , Cheung JK , Ravel J , Seshadri R , DeBoy RT , Ren Q , Varga J , Awad MM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Rosovitz MJ , Sullivan SA , Khouri H , Dimitrov GI , Watkins KL , Mulligan S , Benton J , Radune D , Fisher DJ , Atkins HS , Hiscox T , Jost BH , Billington SJ , Songer JG , McClane BA , Titball RW , Rood JI , Melville SB , Paulsen IT
Ref : Genome Res , 16 :1031 , 2006
Abstract : Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore-forming bacterium commonly found in soil, sediments, and the human gastrointestinal tract. C. perfringens is responsible for a wide spectrum of disease, including food poisoning, gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), enteritis necroticans, and non-foodborne gastrointestinal infections. The complete genome sequences of Clostridium perfringens strain ATCC 13124, a gas gangrene isolate and the species type strain, and the enterotoxin-producing food poisoning strain SM101, were determined and compared with the published C. perfringens strain 13 genome. Comparison of the three genomes revealed considerable genomic diversity with >300 unique "genomic islands" identified, with the majority of these islands unusually clustered on one replichore. PCR-based analysis indicated that the large genomic islands are widely variable across a large collection of C. perfringens strains. These islands encode genes that correlate to differences in virulence and phenotypic characteristics of these strains. Significant differences between the strains include numerous novel mobile elements and genes encoding metabolic capabilities, strain-specific extracellular polysaccharide capsule, sporulation factors, toxins, and other secreted enzymes, providing substantial insight into this medically important bacterial pathogen.
ESTHER : Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
PubMedSearch : Myers_2006_Genome.Res_16_1031
PubMedID: 16825665
Gene_locus related to this paper: clope-CPE0307 , clope-CPE0432 , clope-CPE1581 , clope-CPE1596 , clope-CPE1989 , clope-CPE2231 , clope-lipa , clope-LIPB , clope-PLDB

Title : Major structural differences and novel potential virulence mechanisms from the genomes of multiple campylobacter species - Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
Author(s) : Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Mandrell RE , Miller WG , Rasko DA , Ravel J , Brinkac LM , DeBoy RT , Parker CT , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Sullivan SA , Shetty JU , Ayodeji MA , Shvartsbeyn A , Schatz MC , Badger JH , Fraser CM , Nelson KE
Ref : PLoS Biol , 3 :e15 , 2005
Abstract : Sequencing and comparative genome analysis of four strains of Campylobacter including C. lari RM2100, C. upsaliensis RM3195, and C. coli RM2228 has revealed major structural differences that are associated with the insertion of phage- and plasmid-like genomic islands, as well as major variations in the lipooligosaccharide complex. Poly G tracts are longer, are greater in number, and show greater variability in C. upsaliensis than in the other species. Many genes involved in host colonization, including racR/S, cadF, cdt, ciaB, and flagellin genes, are conserved across the species, but variations that appear to be species specific are evident for a lipooligosaccharide locus, a capsular (extracellular) polysaccharide locus, and a novel Campylobacter putative licABCD virulence locus. The strains also vary in their metabolic profiles, as well as their resistance profiles to a range of antibiotics. It is evident that the newly identified hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins, as well as uncharacterized two-component regulatory systems and membrane proteins, may hold additional significant information on the major differences in virulence among the species, as well as the specificity of the strains for particular hosts.
ESTHER : Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
PubMedSearch : Fouts_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e15
PubMedID: 15660156
Gene_locus related to this paper: camje-CJ0796C , camjr-q5ht69 , camjr-q5ht95 , camjr-q5huc7 , camjr-q5hwg6 , camju-a3yll6

Title : Identification of anthrax toxin genes in a Bacillus cereus associated with an illness resembling inhalation anthrax - Hoffmaster_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_8449
Author(s) : Hoffmaster AR , Ravel J , Rasko DA , Chapman GD , Chute MD , Marston CK , De BK , Sacchi CT , Fitzgerald C , Mayer LW , Maiden MC , Priest FG , Barker M , Jiang L , Cer RZ , Rilstone J , Peterson SN , Weyant RS , Galloway DR , Read TD , Popovic T , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :8449 , 2004
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is the etiologic agent of anthrax, an acute fatal disease among mammals. It was thought to differ from Bacillus cereus, an opportunistic pathogen and cause of food poisoning, by the presence of plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, which encode the lethal toxin complex and the poly-gamma-d-glutamic acid capsule, respectively. This work describes a non-B. anthracis isolate that possesses the anthrax toxin genes and is capable of causing a severe inhalation anthrax-like illness. Although initial phenotypic and 16S rRNA analysis identified this isolate as B. cereus, the rapid generation and analysis of a high-coverage draft genome sequence revealed the presence of a circular plasmid, named pBCXO1, with 99.6% similarity with the B. anthracis toxin-encoding plasmid, pXO1. Although homologues of the pXO2 encoded capsule genes were not found, a polysaccharide capsule cluster is encoded on a second, previously unidentified plasmid, pBC218. A/J mice challenged with B. cereus G9241 confirmed the virulence of this strain. These findings represent an example of how genomics could rapidly assist public health experts responding not only to clearly identified select agents but also to novel agents with similar pathogenic potentials. In this study, we combined a public health approach with genome analysis to provide insight into the correlation of phenotypic characteristics and their genetic basis.
ESTHER : Hoffmaster_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_8449
PubMedSearch : Hoffmaster_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_8449
PubMedID: 15155910
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA5136 , bacc1-q73ab2 , bacc1-q73c56 , bacc1-q735c5 , bacc1-q738j2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC0303 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC3312 , bacce-BC3746 , bacce-BC4102 , bacce-BC4116 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4753 , bacce-BC4854 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-BCE3188 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q4mh74 , bacce-q4mmq7 , bacce-q4mrf9 , bacce-q4mue8 , bacce-q4muz0 , bacce-q4mvq8 , bacce-q4mwb5 , bacce-q4mx61 , bacce-q72yu1 , bacce-q736x9 , bacce-q738e6 , baccr-pepx

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 reveals metabolic adaptations and a large plasmid related to Bacillus anthracis pXO1 - Rasko_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_977
Author(s) : Rasko DA , Ravel J , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Cer RZ , Jiang L , Shores KA , Fouts DE , Tourasse NJ , Angiuoli SV , Kolonay J , Nelson WC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM , Read TD
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 32 :977 , 2004
Abstract : We sequenced the complete genome of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987, a non-lethal dairy isolate in the same genetic subgroup as Bacillus anthracis. Comparison of the chromosomes demonstrated that B.cereus ATCC 10987 was more similar to B.anthracis Ames than B.cereus ATCC 14579, while containing a number of unique metabolic capabilities such as urease and xylose utilization and lacking the ability to utilize nitrate and nitrite. Additionally, genetic mechanisms for variation of capsule carbohydrate and flagella surface structures were identified. Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 contains a single large plasmid (pBc10987), of approximately 208 kb, that is similar in gene content and organization to B.anthracis pXO1 but is lacking the pathogenicity-associated island containing the anthrax lethal and edema toxin complex genes. The chromosomal similarity of B.cereus ATCC 10987 to B.anthracis Ames, as well as the fact that it contains a large pXO1-like plasmid, may make it a possible model for studying B.anthracis plasmid biology and regulatory cross-talk.
ESTHER : Rasko_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_977
PubMedSearch : Rasko_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_977
PubMedID: 14960714
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacc1-q72z64 , bacc1-q73a27 , bacc1-q73ab2 , bacc1-q73br9 , bacc1-q73bx8 , bacc1-q73c56 , bacc1-q73c93 , bacc1-q73cm7 , bacc1-q730c7 , bacc1-q731i0 , bacc1-q732y1 , bacc1-q732z3 , bacc1-q734r1 , bacc1-q735c5 , bacc1-q737t7 , bacc1-q738j2 , bacc1-q739p5 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC0968 , bacce-BC1027 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC3642 , bacce-BC4345 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC4904 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-BCE3188 , bacce-lipP , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , bacce-q73af5 , bacce-q735f1 , bacce-q736x9 , bacce-q738e6 , baccr-pepx

Title : Whole genome comparisons of serotype 4b and 1\/2a strains of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes reveal new insights into the core genome components of this species - Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Ravel J , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Rasko DA , Angiuoli SV , Gill SR , Paulsen IT , Peterson J , White O , Nelson WC , Nierman W , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Haft DH , Selengut J , Van Aken S , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Forberger H , Tran B , Kathariou S , Wonderling LD , Uhlich GA , Bayles DO , Luchansky JB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 32 :2386 , 2004
Abstract : The genomes of three strains of Listeria monocytogenes that have been associated with food-borne illness in the USA were subjected to whole genome comparative analysis. A total of 51, 97 and 69 strain-specific genes were identified in L.monocytogenes strains F2365 (serotype 4b, cheese isolate), F6854 (serotype 1/2a, frankfurter isolate) and H7858 (serotype 4b, meat isolate), respectively. Eighty-three genes were restricted to serotype 1/2a and 51 to serotype 4b strains. These strain- and serotype-specific genes probably contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, and the ability of the organisms to survive and grow in their respective environmental niches. The serotype 1/2a-specific genes include an operon that encodes the rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that is associated with teichoic acid biosynthesis, as well as operons for five glycosyl transferases and an adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase. A total of 8603 and 105 050 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the draft genome sequences of strain H7858 and strain F6854, respectively, when compared with strain F2365. Whole genome comparative analyses revealed that the L.monocytogenes genomes are essentially syntenic, with the majority of genomic differences consisting of phage insertions, transposable elements and SNPs.
ESTHER : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedID: 15115801
Gene_locus related to this paper: lismc-c1l0d9 , lismf-q71xq4 , lismo-LMO0110 , lismo-LMO0493 , lismo-LMO0580 , lismo-LMO0752 , lismo-LMO0760 , lismo-LMO0857 , lismo-LMO0950 , lismo-LMO0951 , lismo-LMO0977 , lismo-LMO1128 , lismo-LMO1258 , lismo-LMO1674 , lismo-LMO2089 , lismo-LMO2109 , lismo-LMO2433 , lismo-LMO2450 , lismo-LMO2452 , lismo-LMO2453 , lismo-LMO2578 , lismo-LMO2677 , lismo-LMO2755 , lismo-metx

Title : Genome sequence of Silicibacter pomeroyi reveals adaptations to the marine environment - Moran_2004_Nature_432_910
Author(s) : Moran MA , Buchan A , Gonzalez JM , Heidelberg JF , Whitman WB , Kiene RP , Henriksen JR , King GM , Belas R , Fuqua C , Brinkac L , Lewis M , Johri S , Weaver B , Pai G , Eisen JA , Rahe E , Sheldon WM , Ye W , Miller TR , Carlton J , Rasko DA , Paulsen IT , Ren Q , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Sullivan SA , Rosovitz MJ , Haft DH , Selengut J , Ward N
Ref : Nature , 432 :910 , 2004
Abstract : Since the recognition of prokaryotes as essential components of the oceanic food web, bacterioplankton have been acknowledged as catalysts of most major biogeochemical processes in the sea. Studying heterotrophic bacterioplankton has been challenging, however, as most major clades have never been cultured or have only been grown to low densities in sea water. Here we describe the genome sequence of Silicibacter pomeroyi, a member of the marine Roseobacter clade (Fig. 1), the relatives of which comprise approximately 10-20% of coastal and oceanic mixed-layer bacterioplankton. This first genome sequence from any major heterotrophic clade consists of a chromosome (4,109,442 base pairs) and megaplasmid (491,611 base pairs). Genome analysis indicates that this organism relies upon a lithoheterotrophic strategy that uses inorganic compounds (carbon monoxide and sulphide) to supplement heterotrophy. Silicibacter pomeroyi also has genes advantageous for associations with plankton and suspended particles, including genes for uptake of algal-derived compounds, use of metabolites from reducing microzones, rapid growth and cell-density-dependent regulation. This bacterium has a physiology distinct from that of marine oligotrophs, adding a new strategy to the recognized repertoire for coping with a nutrient-poor ocean.
ESTHER : Moran_2004_Nature_432_910
PubMedSearch : Moran_2004_Nature_432_910
PubMedID: 15602564
Gene_locus related to this paper: silpo-q5lke5 , silpo-q5lke7 , silpo-q5lke8 , silpo-q5lkk5 , silpo-q5lkv2 , silpo-q5lln9 , silpo-q5llu0 , silpo-q5llu2 , silpo-q5llx5 , silpo-q5lm66 , silpo-q5lmb9 , silpo-q5lml9 , silpo-q5lnp6 , silpo-q5lp28 , silpo-q5lp48 , silpo-q5lp56 , silpo-q5lpa5 , silpo-q5lpf7 , silpo-q5lpy6 , silpo-q5lrk1 , silpo-q5lsn7 , silpo-q5ltb5 , silpo-q5ltk0 , silpo-q5ltm5 , silpo-q5ltw8 , silpo-q5ltw9 , silpo-q5ltx1 , silpo-q5ltx5 , silpo-q5lu02 , silpo-q5lv12 , silpo-q5lv17 , silpo-q5lv53 , silpo-q5lvg9 , silpo-q5lw35 , silpo-q5lwk9 , silpo-q5lws0