Yamada O

References (5)

Title : Genome sequence of Aspergillus luchuensis NBRC 4314 - Yamada_2016_DNA.Res_23_507
Author(s) : Yamada O , Machida M , Hosoyama A , Goto M , Takahashi T , Futagami T , Yamagata Y , Takeuchi M , Kobayashi T , Koike H , Abe K , Asai K , Arita M , Fujita N , Fukuda K , Higa KI , Horikawa H , Ishikawa T , Jinno K , Kato Y , Kirimura K , Mizutani O , Nakasone K , Sano M , Shiraishi Y , Tsukahara M , Gomi K
Ref : DNA Research , 23 :507 , 2016
Abstract : Awamori is a traditional distilled beverage made from steamed Thai-Indica rice in Okinawa, Japan. For brewing the liquor, two microbes, local kuro (black) koji mold Aspergillus luchuensis and awamori yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved. In contrast, that yeasts are used for ethanol fermentation throughout the world, a characteristic of Japanese fermentation industries is the use of Aspergillus molds as a source of enzymes for the maceration and saccharification of raw materials. Here we report the draft genome of a kuro (black) koji mold, A. luchuensis NBRC 4314 (RIB 2604). The total length of nonredundant sequences was nearly 34.7 Mb, comprising approximately 2,300 contigs with 16 telomere-like sequences. In total, 11,691 genes were predicted to encode proteins. Most of the housekeeping genes, such as transcription factors and N-and O-glycosylation system, were conserved with respect to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae An alternative oxidase and acid-stable alpha-amylase regarding citric acid production and fermentation at a low pH as well as a unique glutamic peptidase were also found in the genome. Furthermore, key biosynthetic gene clusters of ochratoxin A and fumonisin B were absent when compared with A. niger genome, showing the safety of A. luchuensis for food and beverage production. This genome information will facilitate not only comparative genomics with industrial kuro-koji molds, but also molecular breeding of the molds in improvements of awamori fermentation.
ESTHER : Yamada_2016_DNA.Res_23_507
PubMedSearch : Yamada_2016_DNA.Res_23_507
PubMedID: 27651094
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9euro-a0a146f3d2

Title : Aspergillus luchuensis, an industrially important black Aspergillus in East Asia - Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
Author(s) : Hong SB , Lee M , Kim DH , Varga J , Frisvad JC , Perrone G , Gomi K , Yamada O , Machida M , Houbraken J , Samson RA
Ref : PLoS ONE , 8 :e63769 , 2013
Abstract : Aspergilli known as black- and white-koji molds which are used for awamori, shochu, makgeolli and other food and beverage fermentations, are reported in the literature as A. luchuensis, A. awamori, A. kawachii, or A. acidus. In order to elucidate the taxonomic position of these species, available ex-type cultures were compared based on morphology and molecular characters. A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus showed the same banding patterns in RAPD, and the three species had the same rDNA-ITS, beta-tubulin and calmodulin sequences and these differed from those of the closely related A. niger and A. tubingensis. Morphologically, the three species are not significantly different from each other or from A. niger and A. tubingensis. It is concluded that A. luchuensis, A. kawachii and A. acidus are the same species, and A. luchuensis is selected as the correct name based on priority. Strains of A. awamori which are stored in National Research Institute of Brewing in Japan, represent A. niger (n = 14) and A. luchuensis (n = 6). The neotype of A. awamori (CBS 557.65 = NRRL 4948) does not originate from awamori fermentation and it is shown to be identical with the unknown taxon Aspergillus welwitschiae. Extrolite analysis of strains of A. luchuensis showed that they do not produce mycotoxins and therefore can be considered safe for food and beverage fermentations. A. luchuensis is also frequently isolated from meju and nuruk in Korea and Puerh tea in China and the species is probably common in the fermentation environment of East Asia. A re-description of A. luchuensis is provided because the incomplete data in the original literature.
ESTHER : Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
PubMedSearch : Hong_2013_PLoS.One_8_e63769
PubMedID: 23723998
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspaw-AXE1

Title : Genomics of Aspergillus oryzae: learning from the history of Koji mold and exploration of its future - Machida_2008_DNA.Res_15_173
Author(s) : Machida M , Yamada O , Gomi K
Ref : DNA Research , 15 :173 , 2008
Abstract : At a time when the notion of microorganisms did not exist, our ancestors empirically established methods for the production of various fermentation foods: miso (bean curd seasoning) and shoyu (soy sauce), both of which have been widely used and are essential for Japanese cooking, and sake, a magical alcoholic drink consumed at a variety of ritual occasions, are typical examples. A filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, is the key organism in the production of all these traditional foods, and its solid-state cultivation (SSC) has been confirmed to be the secret for the high productivity of secretory hydrolases vital for the fermentation process. Indeed, our genome comparison and transcriptome analysis uncovered mechanisms for effective degradation of raw materials in SSC: the extracellular hydrolase genes that have been found only in the A. oryzae genome but not in A. fumigatus are highly induced during SSC but not in liquid cultivation. Also, the temperature reduction process empirically adopted in the traditional soy-sauce fermentation processes has been found to be important to keep strong expression of the A. oryzae-specific extracellular hydrolases. One of the prominent potentials of A. oryzae is that it has been successfully applied to effective degradation of biodegradable plastic. Both cutinase, responsible for the degradation of plastic, and hydrophobin, which recruits cutinase on the hydrophobic surface to enhance degradation, have been discovered in A. oryzae. Genomic analysis in concert with traditional knowledge and technology will continue to be powerful tools in the future exploration of A. oryzae.
ESTHER : Machida_2008_DNA.Res_15_173
PubMedSearch : Machida_2008_DNA.Res_15_173
PubMedID: 18820080

Title : Molecular analysis of an inactive aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster in Aspergillus oryzae RIB strains - Tominaga_2006_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_72_484
Author(s) : Tominaga M , Lee YH , Hayashi R , Suzuki Y , Yamada O , Sakamoto K , Gotoh K , Akita O
Ref : Applied Environmental Microbiology , 72 :484 , 2006
Abstract : To help assess the potential for aflatoxin production by Aspergillus oryzae, the structure of an aflatoxin biosynthesis gene homolog cluster in A. oryzae RIB 40 was analyzed. Although most genes in the corresponding cluster exhibited from 97 to 99% similarity to those of Aspergillus flavus, three genes shared 93% similarity or less. A 257-bp deletion in the aflT region, a frameshift mutation in norA, and a base pair substitution in verA were found in A. oryzae RIB 40. In the aflR promoter, two substitutions were found in one of the three putative AreA binding sites and in the FacB binding site. PCR primers were designed to amplify homologs of aflT, nor-1, aflR, norA, avnA, verB, and vbs and were used to detect these genes in 210 A. oryzae strains. Based on the PCR results, the A. oryzae RIB strains were classified into three groups, although most of them fell into two of the groups. Group 1, in which amplification of all seven genes was confirmed, contained 122 RIB strains (58.1% of examined strains), including RIB 40. Seventy-seven strains (36.7%) belonged to group 2, characterized by having only vbs, verB, and avnA in half of the cluster. Although slight expression of aflR was detected by reverse transcription-PCR in some group 1 strains, including RIB 40, other genes (avnA, vbs, verB, and omtA) related to aflatoxin production were not detected. aflR was not detected in group 2 strains by Southern analysis.
ESTHER : Tominaga_2006_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_72_484
PubMedSearch : Tominaga_2006_Appl.Environ.Microbiol_72_484
PubMedID: 16391082
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspor-PKSL1 , asppa-q6ueg5

Title : Genome sequencing and analysis of Aspergillus oryzae - Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
Author(s) : Machida M , Asai K , Sano M , Tanaka T , Kumagai T , Terai G , Kusumoto K , Arima T , Akita O , Kashiwagi Y , Abe K , Gomi K , Horiuchi H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Takeuchi M , Denning DW , Galagan JE , Nierman WC , Yu J , Archer DB , Bennett JW , Bhatnagar D , Cleveland TE , Fedorova ND , Gotoh O , Horikawa H , Hosoyama A , Ichinomiya M , Igarashi R , Iwashita K , Juvvadi PR , Kato M , Kato Y , Kin T , Kokubun A , Maeda H , Maeyama N , Maruyama J , Nagasaki H , Nakajima T , Oda K , Okada K , Paulsen I , Sakamoto K , Sawano T , Takahashi M , Takase K , Terabayashi Y , Wortman JR , Yamada O , Yamagata Y , Anazawa H , Hata Y , Koide Y , Komori T , Koyama Y , Minetoki T , Suharnan S , Tanaka A , Isono K , Kuhara S , Ogasawara N , Kikuchi H
Ref : Nature , 438 :1157 , 2005
Abstract : The genome of Aspergillus oryzae, a fungus important for the production of traditional fermented foods and beverages in Japan, has been sequenced. The ability to secrete large amounts of proteins and the development of a transformation system have facilitated the use of A. oryzae in modern biotechnology. Although both A. oryzae and Aspergillus flavus belong to the section Flavi of the subgenus Circumdati of Aspergillus, A. oryzae, unlike A. flavus, does not produce aflatoxin, and its long history of use in the food industry has proved its safety. Here we show that the 37-megabase (Mb) genome of A. oryzae contains 12,074 genes and is expanded by 7-9 Mb in comparison with the genomes of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Comparison of the three aspergilli species revealed the presence of syntenic blocks and A. oryzae-specific blocks (lacking synteny with A. nidulans and A. fumigatus) in a mosaic manner throughout the genome of A. oryzae. The blocks of A. oryzae-specific sequence are enriched for genes involved in metabolism, particularly those for the synthesis of secondary metabolites. Specific expansion of genes for secretory hydrolytic enzymes, amino acid metabolism and amino acid/sugar uptake transporters supports the idea that A. oryzae is an ideal microorganism for fermentation.
ESTHER : Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
PubMedSearch : Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
PubMedID: 16372010
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspor-Q2U722 , aspfn-b8mvx2 , aspfn-b8mwk1 , aspfn-b8n1a4 , aspfn-b8n5l3 , aspfn-b8n7y0 , aspfn-b8n829 , aspfn-b8ncj5 , aspfn-b8nhj9 , aspfn-b8njx6 , aspfn-b8nsk2 , aspfu-q4wj61 , aspor-axe1 , aspor-CPI , aspor-cutas , aspor-cuti2 , aspor-DPPIV , aspor-faec , aspor-MDLB , aspor-ppme1 , aspor-q2tw11 , aspor-q2tw16 , aspor-q2tw28 , aspor-q2twc4 , aspor-q2twg0 , aspor-q2twj3 , aspor-q2twv2 , aspor-q2twv4 , aspor-q2tx21 , aspor-q2txq8 , aspor-q2tya1 , aspor-q2tyh6 , aspor-q2tyn9 , aspor-q2typ0 , aspor-q2tyq4 , aspor-q2tyv8 , aspor-q2tz03 , aspor-q2tzh3 , aspor-q2tzr5 , aspor-q2tzv9 , aspor-q2u0k7 , aspor-q2u0q2 , aspor-q2u0r6 , aspor-q2u1a5 , aspor-q2u1a6 , aspor-q2u1k0 , aspor-q2u1k8 , aspor-q2u1m8 , aspor-q2u2a1 , aspor-q2u2a4 , aspor-q2u3a3 , aspor-q2u3a6 , aspor-q2u3k5 , aspor-q2u3l6 , aspor-q2u4a0 , aspor-q2u4e0 , aspor-q2u4f6 , aspor-q2u4g6 , aspor-q2u4h9 , aspor-q2u4w9 , aspor-q2u4y8 , aspor-q2u5f5 , aspor-q2u5n3 , aspor-q2u5y8 , aspor-q2u6h7 , aspor-q2u6j5 , aspor-q2u6m8 , aspor-q2u6m9 , aspor-q2u6n6 , aspor-q2u7i2 , aspor-q2u7v0 , aspor-q2u8j8 , aspor-q2u8r1 , aspor-q2u8r4 , aspor-q2u8t5 , aspor-q2u8z3 , aspor-q2u9a1 , aspor-q2u9n5 , aspor-q2u144 , aspor-q2u161 , aspor-q2u185 , aspor-q2u199 , aspor-q2u212 , aspor-q2u331 , aspor-q2u348 , aspor-q2u400 , aspor-q2u453 , aspor-q2u489 , aspor-q2u704 , aspor-q2u728 , aspor-q2u798 , aspor-q2u822 , aspor-q2u854 , aspor-q2u875 , aspor-q2u908 , aspor-q2ua10 , aspor-q2ua48 , aspor-q2uab6 , aspor-q2uak9 , aspor-q2uaq4 , aspor-q2ub32 , aspor-q2ub76 , aspor-q2uba1 , aspor-q2ubd6 , aspor-q2ubm2 , aspor-q2ubr2 , aspor-q2uc28 , aspor-q2uc65 , aspor-q2uc77 , aspor-q2uc98 , aspor-q2uck0 , aspor-q2ucy7 , aspor-q2ud03 , aspor-q2ud06 , aspor-q2ud08 , aspor-q2ud23 , aspor-q2udn5 , aspor-q2udr0 , aspor-q2uec1 , aspor-q2uef3 , aspor-q2uf10 , aspor-q2uf27 , aspor-q2uf48 , aspor-q2ufd8 , aspor-q2ufe5 , aspor-q2ufm4 , aspor-q2ufr3 , aspor-q2ufz8 , aspor-q2ug78 , aspor-q2ugd6 , aspor-q2uge1 , aspor-q2ugg7 , aspor-q2ugi2 , aspor-q2ugl2 , aspor-q2ugy9 , aspor-q2uh24 , aspor-q2uh73 , aspor-q2uhe4 , aspor-q2uhf0 , aspor-q2uhj6 , aspor-q2uhn1 , aspor-q2uhq0 , aspor-q2ui56 , aspor-q2uib2 , aspor-q2uib5 , aspor-q2uie9 , aspor-q2uih1 , aspor-q2uii1 , aspor-q2uik9 , aspor-q2uiq0 , aspor-q2uiu1 , aspor-q2uix9 , aspor-q2uiy5 , aspor-q2uiz4 , aspor-q2uj89 , aspor-q2uja2 , aspor-q2uju3 , aspor-q2uk31 , aspor-q2uk42 , aspor-q2ukb6 , aspor-q2ukq7 , aspor-q2ul81 , aspor-q2uli9 , aspor-q2ulr2 , aspor-q2ulv7 , aspor-q2umf3 , aspor-q2umv2 , aspor-q2umx6 , aspor-q2unw5 , aspor-q2up23 , aspor-q2up89 , aspor-q2upe6 , aspor-q2upi1 , aspor-q2upl1 , aspor-q2upw4 , aspor-q2uq56 , aspor-q2uqb4 , aspor-q2uqm7 , aspor-q2ur58 , aspor-q2ur64 , aspor-q2ur80 , aspor-q2ur83 , aspor-q2ure7 , aspor-q2urf3 , aspor-q2urg5 , aspor-q2urq0 , aspor-q2urt4 , aspor-q2uru5 , aspor-q2usi0 , aspor-q2usp7 , aspor-q2usq8 , aspor-q2usv6 , aspor-q2uta5 , aspor-q2uu89 , aspor-q2uub4 , aspor-q2uux8 , aspor-q2uv29 , aspor-TGLA , aspor-q2ue03 , aspor-q2uj83 , aspno-a0a0l1j1c9