Denning DW

References (5)

Title : Genomic islands in the pathogenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
Author(s) : Fedorova ND , Khaldi N , Joardar VS , Maiti R , Amedeo P , Anderson MJ , Crabtree J , Silva JC , Badger JH , Albarraq A , Angiuoli S , Bussey H , Bowyer P , Cotty PJ , Dyer PS , Egan A , Galens K , Fraser-Liggett CM , Haas BJ , Inman JM , Kent R , Lemieux S , Malavazi I , Orvis J , Roemer T , Ronning CM , Sundaram JP , Sutton G , Turner G , Venter JC , White OR , Whitty BR , Youngman P , Wolfe KH , Goldman GH , Wortman JR , Jiang B , Denning DW , Nierman WC
Ref : PLoS Genet , 4 :e1000046 , 2008
Abstract : We present the genome sequences of a new clinical isolate of the important human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, A1163, and two closely related but rarely pathogenic species, Neosartorya fischeri NRRL181 and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1. Comparative genomic analysis of A1163 with the recently sequenced A. fumigatus isolate Af293 has identified core, variable and up to 2% unique genes in each genome. While the core genes are 99.8% identical at the nucleotide level, identity for variable genes can be as low 40%. The most divergent loci appear to contain heterokaryon incompatibility (het) genes associated with fungal programmed cell death such as developmental regulator rosA. Cross-species comparison has revealed that 8.5%, 13.5% and 12.6%, respectively, of A. fumigatus, N. fischeri and A. clavatus genes are species-specific. These genes are significantly smaller in size than core genes, contain fewer exons and exhibit a subtelomeric bias. Most of them cluster together in 13 chromosomal islands, which are enriched for pseudogenes, transposons and other repetitive elements. At least 20% of A. fumigatus-specific genes appear to be functional and involved in carbohydrate and chitin catabolism, transport, detoxification, secondary metabolism and other functions that may facilitate the adaptation to heterogeneous environments such as soil or a mammalian host. Contrary to what was suggested previously, their origin cannot be attributed to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), but instead is likely to involve duplication, diversification and differential gene loss (DDL). The role of duplication in the origin of lineage-specific genes is further underlined by the discovery of genomic islands that seem to function as designated "gene dumps" and, perhaps, simultaneously, as "gene factories".
ESTHER : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedSearch : Fedorova_2008_PLoS.Genet_4_e1000046
PubMedID: 18404212
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspcl-a1c4m6 , aspcl-a1c5a7 , aspcl-a1c6w3 , aspcl-a1c8p7 , aspcl-a1c8q9 , aspcl-a1c9k4 , aspcl-a1c759 , aspcl-a1c786 , aspcl-a1c823 , aspcl-a1c859 , aspcl-a1c881 , aspcl-a1c994 , aspcl-a1cag4 , aspcl-a1caj8 , aspcl-a1cas0 , aspcl-a1cc86 , aspcl-a1ccq2 , aspcl-a1cfv7 , aspcl-a1chj6 , aspcl-a1cif4 , aspcl-a1ck14 , aspcl-a1cke4 , aspcl-a1ckq1 , aspcl-a1cli1 , aspcl-a1cln8 , aspcl-a1cm72 , aspcl-a1cns2 , aspcl-a1cpk9 , aspcl-a1cra8 , aspcl-a1crr5 , aspcl-a1crs9 , aspcl-a1cs04 , aspcl-a1cs39 , aspcl-a1cu39 , aspcl-atg15 , aspcl-axe1 , aspcl-cuti1 , aspcl-cuti3 , aspcl-dapb , aspcl-dpp4 , aspcl-dpp5 , aspcl-faeb , aspcl-faec1 , aspcl-faec2 , aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-b0y2h6 , aspfc-b0y962 , aspfc-b0yaj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-DPP4 , aspfu-faeb1 , aspfu-faec , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4w9r3 , aspfu-q4w9t5 , aspfu-q4w9z4 , aspfu-q4wa57 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wag0 , aspfu-q4wal3 , aspfu-q4wbc5 , aspfu-q4wbj7 , aspfu-q4wdg2 , aspfu-q4wf06 , aspfu-q4wf29 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wfq9 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wgm4 , aspfu-q4win2 , aspfu-q4wk31 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wk90 , aspfu-q4wm12 , aspfu-q4wm84 , aspfu-q4wm86 , aspfu-q4wmr0 , aspfu-q4wny7 , aspfu-q4wp19 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqj8 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wrr7 , aspfu-q4wu51 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wui7 , aspfu-q4wuk8 , aspfu-q4wum3 , aspfu-q4wuw0 , aspfu-q4wvy1 , aspfu-q4ww22 , aspfu-q4wx13 , aspfu-q4wxd0 , aspfu-q4wxe4 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4wyq5 , aspfu-q4wz16 , aspfu-q4wzd5 , aspfu-q4wzh6 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q4x1w9 , aspfu-q4x078 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1d4m8 , neofi-a1d4p0 , neofi-a1d5p2 , neofi-a1d104 , neofi-a1d380 , neofi-a1d512 , neofi-a1d654 , neofi-a1da18 , neofi-a1dal8 , neofi-a1df46 , neofi-a1dhj0 , neofi-a1di44 , neofi-a1dk35 , neofi-a1dki7 , neofi-a1dkt6 , neofi-a1dn55 , neofi-atg15 , neofi-axe1 , neofi-faeb1 , neofi-faeb2 , neofi-faec , aspcl-a1cd34 , aspcl-a1cd88 , neofi-a1dc66 , aspcl-a1ceh5 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspcl-a1cqb5 , aspcl-a1cs44 , neofi-a1d517 , neofi-a1dbz0 , neofi-a1cuz0 , aspcl-a1c5e8 , neofi-a1d0b8 , aspcl-a1cdf0 , aspcl-a1ccd3 , neofi-a1da82 , neofi-a1d5e6 , aspcl-kex1 , aspcl-cbpya

Title : Genome sequencing and analysis of Aspergillus oryzae - Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
Author(s) : Machida M , Asai K , Sano M , Tanaka T , Kumagai T , Terai G , Kusumoto K , Arima T , Akita O , Kashiwagi Y , Abe K , Gomi K , Horiuchi H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Takeuchi M , Denning DW , Galagan JE , Nierman WC , Yu J , Archer DB , Bennett JW , Bhatnagar D , Cleveland TE , Fedorova ND , Gotoh O , Horikawa H , Hosoyama A , Ichinomiya M , Igarashi R , Iwashita K , Juvvadi PR , Kato M , Kato Y , Kin T , Kokubun A , Maeda H , Maeyama N , Maruyama J , Nagasaki H , Nakajima T , Oda K , Okada K , Paulsen I , Sakamoto K , Sawano T , Takahashi M , Takase K , Terabayashi Y , Wortman JR , Yamada O , Yamagata Y , Anazawa H , Hata Y , Koide Y , Komori T , Koyama Y , Minetoki T , Suharnan S , Tanaka A , Isono K , Kuhara S , Ogasawara N , Kikuchi H
Ref : Nature , 438 :1157 , 2005
Abstract : The genome of Aspergillus oryzae, a fungus important for the production of traditional fermented foods and beverages in Japan, has been sequenced. The ability to secrete large amounts of proteins and the development of a transformation system have facilitated the use of A. oryzae in modern biotechnology. Although both A. oryzae and Aspergillus flavus belong to the section Flavi of the subgenus Circumdati of Aspergillus, A. oryzae, unlike A. flavus, does not produce aflatoxin, and its long history of use in the food industry has proved its safety. Here we show that the 37-megabase (Mb) genome of A. oryzae contains 12,074 genes and is expanded by 7-9 Mb in comparison with the genomes of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Comparison of the three aspergilli species revealed the presence of syntenic blocks and A. oryzae-specific blocks (lacking synteny with A. nidulans and A. fumigatus) in a mosaic manner throughout the genome of A. oryzae. The blocks of A. oryzae-specific sequence are enriched for genes involved in metabolism, particularly those for the synthesis of secondary metabolites. Specific expansion of genes for secretory hydrolytic enzymes, amino acid metabolism and amino acid/sugar uptake transporters supports the idea that A. oryzae is an ideal microorganism for fermentation.
ESTHER : Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
PubMedSearch : Machida_2005_Nature_438_1157
PubMedID: 16372010
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspor-Q2U722 , aspfn-b8mvx2 , aspfn-b8mwk1 , aspfn-b8n1a4 , aspfn-b8n5l3 , aspfn-b8n7y0 , aspfn-b8n829 , aspfn-b8ncj5 , aspfn-b8nhj9 , aspfn-b8njx6 , aspfn-b8nsk2 , aspfu-q4wj61 , aspor-axe1 , aspor-CPI , aspor-cutas , aspor-cuti2 , aspor-DPPIV , aspor-faec , aspor-MDLB , aspor-ppme1 , aspor-q2tw11 , aspor-q2tw16 , aspor-q2tw28 , aspor-q2twc4 , aspor-q2twg0 , aspor-q2twj3 , aspor-q2twv2 , aspor-q2twv4 , aspor-q2tx21 , aspor-q2txq8 , aspor-q2tya1 , aspor-q2tyh6 , aspor-q2tyn9 , aspor-q2typ0 , aspor-q2tyq4 , aspor-q2tyv8 , aspor-q2tz03 , aspor-q2tzh3 , aspor-q2tzr5 , aspor-q2tzv9 , aspor-q2u0k7 , aspor-q2u0q2 , aspor-q2u0r6 , aspor-q2u1a5 , aspor-q2u1a6 , aspor-q2u1k0 , aspor-q2u1k8 , aspor-q2u1m8 , aspor-q2u2a1 , aspor-q2u2a4 , aspor-q2u3a3 , aspor-q2u3a6 , aspor-q2u3k5 , aspor-q2u3l6 , aspor-q2u4a0 , aspor-q2u4e0 , aspor-q2u4f6 , aspor-q2u4g6 , aspor-q2u4h9 , aspor-q2u4w9 , aspor-q2u4y8 , aspor-q2u5f5 , aspor-q2u5n3 , aspor-q2u5y8 , aspor-q2u6h7 , aspor-q2u6j5 , aspor-q2u6m8 , aspor-q2u6m9 , aspor-q2u6n6 , aspor-q2u7i2 , aspor-q2u7v0 , aspor-q2u8j8 , aspor-q2u8r1 , aspor-q2u8r4 , aspor-q2u8t5 , aspor-q2u8z3 , aspor-q2u9a1 , aspor-q2u9n5 , aspor-q2u144 , aspor-q2u161 , aspor-q2u185 , aspor-q2u199 , aspor-q2u212 , aspor-q2u331 , aspor-q2u348 , aspor-q2u400 , aspor-q2u453 , aspor-q2u489 , aspor-q2u704 , aspor-q2u728 , aspor-q2u798 , aspor-q2u822 , aspor-q2u854 , aspor-q2u875 , aspor-q2u908 , aspor-q2ua10 , aspor-q2ua48 , aspor-q2uab6 , aspor-q2uak9 , aspor-q2uaq4 , aspor-q2ub32 , aspor-q2ub76 , aspor-q2uba1 , aspor-q2ubd6 , aspor-q2ubm2 , aspor-q2ubr2 , aspor-q2uc28 , aspor-q2uc65 , aspor-q2uc77 , aspor-q2uc98 , aspor-q2uck0 , aspor-q2ucy7 , aspor-q2ud03 , aspor-q2ud06 , aspor-q2ud08 , aspor-q2ud23 , aspor-q2udn5 , aspor-q2udr0 , aspor-q2uec1 , aspor-q2uef3 , aspor-q2uf10 , aspor-q2uf27 , aspor-q2uf48 , aspor-q2ufd8 , aspor-q2ufe5 , aspor-q2ufm4 , aspor-q2ufr3 , aspor-q2ufz8 , aspor-q2ug78 , aspor-q2ugd6 , aspor-q2uge1 , aspor-q2ugg7 , aspor-q2ugi2 , aspor-q2ugl2 , aspor-q2ugy9 , aspor-q2uh24 , aspor-q2uh73 , aspor-q2uhe4 , aspor-q2uhf0 , aspor-q2uhj6 , aspor-q2uhn1 , aspor-q2uhq0 , aspor-q2ui56 , aspor-q2uib2 , aspor-q2uib5 , aspor-q2uie9 , aspor-q2uih1 , aspor-q2uii1 , aspor-q2uik9 , aspor-q2uiq0 , aspor-q2uiu1 , aspor-q2uix9 , aspor-q2uiy5 , aspor-q2uiz4 , aspor-q2uj89 , aspor-q2uja2 , aspor-q2uju3 , aspor-q2uk31 , aspor-q2uk42 , aspor-q2ukb6 , aspor-q2ukq7 , aspor-q2ul81 , aspor-q2uli9 , aspor-q2ulr2 , aspor-q2ulv7 , aspor-q2umf3 , aspor-q2umv2 , aspor-q2umx6 , aspor-q2unw5 , aspor-q2up23 , aspor-q2up89 , aspor-q2upe6 , aspor-q2upi1 , aspor-q2upl1 , aspor-q2upw4 , aspor-q2uq56 , aspor-q2uqb4 , aspor-q2uqm7 , aspor-q2ur58 , aspor-q2ur64 , aspor-q2ur80 , aspor-q2ur83 , aspor-q2ure7 , aspor-q2urf3 , aspor-q2urg5 , aspor-q2urq0 , aspor-q2urt4 , aspor-q2uru5 , aspor-q2usi0 , aspor-q2usp7 , aspor-q2usq8 , aspor-q2usv6 , aspor-q2uta5 , aspor-q2uu89 , aspor-q2uub4 , aspor-q2uux8 , aspor-q2uv29 , aspor-TGLA , aspor-q2ue03 , aspor-q2uj83 , aspno-a0a0l1j1c9

Title : Sequencing of Aspergillus nidulans and comparative analysis with A. fumigatus and A. oryzae - Galagan_2005_Nature_438_1105
Author(s) : Galagan JE , Calvo SE , Cuomo C , Ma LJ , Wortman JR , Batzoglou S , Lee SI , Basturkmen M , Spevak CC , Clutterbuck J , Kapitonov V , Jurka J , Scazzocchio C , Farman M , Butler J , Purcell S , Harris S , Braus GH , Draht O , Busch S , d'Enfert C , Bouchier C , Goldman GH , Bell-Pedersen D , Griffiths-Jones S , Doonan JH , Yu J , Vienken K , Pain A , Freitag M , Selker EU , Archer DB , Penalva MA , Oakley BR , Momany M , Tanaka T , Kumagai T , Asai K , Machida M , Nierman WC , Denning DW , Caddick M , Hynes M , Paoletti M , Fischer R , Miller B , Dyer P , Sachs MS , Osmani SA , Birren BW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1105 , 2005
Abstract : The aspergilli comprise a diverse group of filamentous fungi spanning over 200 million years of evolution. Here we report the genome sequence of the model organism Aspergillus nidulans, and a comparative study with Aspergillus fumigatus, a serious human pathogen, and Aspergillus oryzae, used in the production of sake, miso and soy sauce. Our analysis of genome structure provided a quantitative evaluation of forces driving long-term eukaryotic genome evolution. It also led to an experimentally validated model of mating-type locus evolution, suggesting the potential for sexual reproduction in A. fumigatus and A. oryzae. Our analysis of sequence conservation revealed over 5,000 non-coding regions actively conserved across all three species. Within these regions, we identified potential functional elements including a previously uncharacterized TPP riboswitch and motifs suggesting regulation in filamentous fungi by Puf family genes. We further obtained comparative and experimental evidence indicating widespread translational regulation by upstream open reading frames. These results enhance our understanding of these widely studied fungi as well as provide new insight into eukaryotic genome evolution and gene regulation.
ESTHER : Galagan_2005_Nature_438_1105
PubMedSearch : Galagan_2005_Nature_438_1105
PubMedID: 16372000
Gene_locus related to this paper: emeni-axe1 , emeni-BST1 , emeni-c8vrl3 , emeni-CUTI3 , emeni-faec , emeni-ppme1 , emeni-q5aqv0 , emeni-q5ara9 , emeni-q5av79 , emeni-q5avd3 , emeni-q5awc7 , emeni-q5awq3 , emeni-q5awu9 , emeni-q5aww7 , emeni-q5ax50 , emeni-q5ay37 , emeni-q5ay57 , emeni-q5ayk9 , emeni-q5az32 , emeni-q5azl2 , emeni-q5azp1 , emeni-q5b1v2 , emeni-q5b2c1 , emeni-q5b3d2 , emeni-q5b5j7 , emeni-q5b7i6 , emeni-q5b8p6 , emeni-q5b9e7 , emeni-q5b246 , emeni-q5b446 , emeni-q5b602 , emeni-q5b938 , emeni-q5ba78 , emeni-q5bad3 , emeni-q5bar0 , emeni-q5bcd1 , emeni-q5bcd2 , emeni-q5bcf8 , emeni-q5bdr0 , emeni-q5beh9 , emeni-q5bgk7 , emeni-q7si80 , emeni-q5bdv9 , emeni-c8vu15 , 9euro-a0a3d8t644 , emeni-q5b719 , emeni-q5ax97 , emeni-tdia , emeni-afoc , emeni-dbae

Title : Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Pain A , Anderson MJ , Wortman JR , Kim HS , Arroyo J , Berriman M , Abe K , Archer DB , Bermejo C , Bennett J , Bowyer P , Chen D , Collins M , Coulsen R , Davies R , Dyer PS , Farman M , Fedorova N , Feldblyum TV , Fischer R , Fosker N , Fraser A , Garcia JL , Garcia MJ , Goble A , Goldman GH , Gomi K , Griffith-Jones S , Gwilliam R , Haas B , Haas H , Harris D , Horiuchi H , Huang J , Humphray S , Jimenez J , Keller N , Khouri H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Konzack S , Kulkarni R , Kumagai T , Lafon A , Latge JP , Li W , Lord A , Lu C , Majoros WH , May GS , Miller BL , Mohamoud Y , Molina M , Monod M , Mouyna I , Mulligan S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Paulsen I , Penalva MA , Pertea M , Price C , Pritchard BL , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlins N , Rajandream MA , Reichard U , Renauld H , Robson GD , Rodriguez de Cordoba S , Rodriguez-Pena JM , Ronning CM , Rutter S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez M , Sanchez-Ferrero JC , Saunders D , Seeger K , Squares R , Squares S , Takeuchi M , Tekaia F , Turner G , Vazquez de Aldana CR , Weidman J , White O , Woodward J , Yu JH , Fraser C , Galagan JE , Asai K , Machida M , Hall N , Barrell B , Denning DW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1151 , 2005
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedID: 16372009
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-apth1 , aspfu-axe1 , aspfu-CBPYA , aspfu-faec , aspfu-kex1 , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4wa39 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wkh6 , aspfu-q4wnx3 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q5vjg7 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspfu-fmac

Title : Insight into the genome of Aspergillus fumigatus: analysis of a 922 kb region encompassing the nitrate assimilation gene cluster - Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
Author(s) : Pain A , Woodward J , Quail MA , Anderson MJ , Clark R , Collins M , Fosker N , Fraser A , Harris D , Larke N , Murphy L , Humphray S , O'Neil S , Pertea M , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Salzberg S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Warren T , Denning DW , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Fungal Genet Biol , 41 :443 , 2004
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is the most ubiquitous opportunistic filamentous fungal pathogen of human. As an initial step toward sequencing the entire genome of A. fumigatus, which is estimated to be approximately 30 Mb in size, we have sequenced a 922 kb region, contained within 16 overlapping bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Fifty-four percent of the DNA is predicted to be coding with 341 putative protein coding genes. Functional classification of the proteins showed the presence of a higher proportion of enzymes and membrane transporters when compared to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to the nitrate assimilation gene cluster, the quinate utilisation gene cluster is also present on this 922 kb genomic sequence. We observed large scale synteny between A. fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans by comparing this sequence to the A. nidulans genetic map of linkage group VIII.
ESTHER : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedSearch : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedID: 14998527
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfu-q6my76 , aspfu-q6myf7 , aspfu-q6myz3