Butchko RA

References (3)

Title : Lae1 regulates expression of multiple secondary metabolite gene clusters in Fusarium verticillioides - Butchko_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_602
Author(s) : Butchko RA , Brown DW , Busman M , Tudzynski B , Wiemann P
Ref : Fungal Genet Biol , 49 :602 , 2012
Abstract : The filamentous fungus Fusarium verticillioides can cause disease of maize and is capable of producing fumonisins, a family of toxic secondary metabolites linked to esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in humans and lung edema in swine and leukoencephalomalacia in equines. The expression of fumonisin biosynthetic genes is influenced by broad-domain transcription factors (global regulators) and Fum21, a pathway-specific transcription factor. LaeA is a global regulator that in Aspergillus nidulans, affects the expression of multiple secondary metabolite gene clusters by modifying heterochromatin structure. Here, we employed gene deletion analysis to assess the effect of loss of a F. verticillioides laeA orthologue, LAE1, on genome-wide gene expression and secondary metabolite production. Loss of Lae1 resulted in reduced expression of gene clusters responsible for synthesis of the secondary metabolites bikaverin, fumonisins, fusaric acid and fusarins as well as two clusters for which the corresponding secondary metabolite is unknown. Analysis of secondary metabolites revealed that, in contrast to a previously described Fusarium fujikuroi lae1 mutant, bikaverin production is reduced. Fumonisin production is unchanged in the F. verticillioides lae1 mutant. Complementation of the F. verticillioides mutant resulted in increased fumonisin production.
ESTHER : Butchko_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_602
PubMedSearch : Butchko_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_602
PubMedID: 22713715
Gene_locus related to this paper: gibf5-fub4 , gibf5-fub5

Title : Identification of gene clusters associated with fusaric acid, fusarin, and perithecial pigment production in Fusarium verticillioides - Brown_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_521
Author(s) : Brown DW , Butchko RA , Busman M , Proctor RH
Ref : Fungal Genet Biol , 49 :521 , 2012
Abstract : The genus Fusarium is of concern to agricultural production and food/feed safety because of its ability to cause crop disease and to produce mycotoxins. Understanding the genetic basis for production of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites (SMs) has the potential to limit crop disease and mycotoxin contamination. In fungi, SM biosynthetic genes are typically located adjacent to one another in clusters of co-expressed genes. Such clusters typically include a core gene, responsible for synthesis of an initial chemical, and several genes responsible for chemical modifications, transport, and/or regulation. Fusarium verticillioides is one of the most common pathogens of maize and produces a variety of SMs of concern. Here, we employed whole genome expression analysis and utilized existing knowledge of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes, a common cluster core gene, to identify three novel clusters of co-expressed genes in F. verticillioides. Functional analysis of the PKS genes linked the clusters to production of three known Fusarium SMs, a violet pigment in sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and the mycotoxins fusarin C and fusaric acid. The results indicate that microarray analysis of RNA derived from culture conditions that induce differential gene expression can be an effective tool for identifying SM biosynthetic gene clusters.
ESTHER : Brown_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_521
PubMedSearch : Brown_2012_Fungal.Genet.Biol_49_521
PubMedID: 22652150
Gene_locus related to this paper: gibf5-fus2 , gibf5-fub4 , gibf5-fub5 , gibf5-fus5

Title : Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium - Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
Author(s) : Ma LJ , van der Does HC , Borkovich KA , Coleman JJ , Daboussi MJ , Di Pietro A , Dufresne M , Freitag M , Grabherr M , Henrissat B , Houterman PM , Kang S , Shim WB , Woloshuk C , Xie X , Xu JR , Antoniw J , Baker SE , Bluhm BH , Breakspear A , Brown DW , Butchko RA , Chapman S , Coulson R , Coutinho PM , Danchin EG , Diener A , Gale LR , Gardiner DM , Goff S , Hammond-Kosack KE , Hilburn K , Hua-Van A , Jonkers W , Kazan K , Kodira CD , Koehrsen M , Kumar L , Lee YH , Li L , Manners JM , Miranda-Saavedra D , Mukherjee M , Park G , Park J , Park SY , Proctor RH , Regev A , Ruiz-Roldan MC , Sain D , Sakthikumar S , Sykes S , Schwartz DC , Turgeon BG , Wapinski I , Yoder O , Young S , Zeng Q , Zhou S , Galagan J , Cuomo CA , Kistler HC , Rep M
Ref : Nature , 464 :367 , 2010
Abstract : Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes and account for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity, indicative of horizontal acquisition. Experimentally, we demonstrate the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, converting a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in F. oxysporum. These findings put the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.
ESTHER : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedSearch : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedID: 20237561
Gene_locus related to this paper: fusox-a0a1d3s5h0 , gibf5-fus2 , fusof-f9f2k2 , fusof-f9f3l6 , fusof-f9f6t8 , fusof-f9f6v2 , fusof-f9f132 , fusof-f9f781 , fusof-f9fd72 , fusof-f9fd90 , fusof-f9fem0 , fusof-f9fhk2 , fusof-f9fj19 , fusof-f9fj20 , fusof-f9fki8 , fusof-f9fmx2 , fusof-f9fnt4 , fusof-f9fpy4 , fusof-f9fvs6 , fusof-f9fwu0 , fusof-f9fxz4 , fusof-f9fzy5 , fusof-f9g2a2 , fusof-f9g3b1 , fusof-f9g5h7 , fusof-f9g6e6 , fusof-f9g6y7 , fusof-f9g7b0 , fusof-f9g797 , fusof-f9g972 , fusof-f9ga50 , fusof-f9gck4 , fusof-f9gd15 , gibze-a8w610 , gibze-b1pdn0 , gibze-i1r9e6 , gibze-i1rda9 , gibze-i1rdk7 , gibze-i1rec8 , gibze-i1rgs0 , gibze-i1rgy0 , gibze-i1rh52 , gibze-i1rhi8 , gibze-i1rig9 , gibze-i1rip5 , gibze-i1rpg6 , gibze-i1rsg2 , gibze-i1rv36 , gibze-i1rxm5 , gibze-i1rxp8 , gibze-i1rxv5 , gibze-i1s1u3 , gibze-i1s3j9 , gibze-i1s6l7 , gibze-i1s8i8 , gibze-i1s9x4 , gibze-q4huy1 , gibze-i1rg17 , fuso4-j9mvr9 , fuso4-j9ngs6 , fuso4-j9niq8 , fuso4-j9nqm2 , gibze-i1rb76 , gibze-i1s1m7 , gibze-i1s3z6 , gibze-i1rd78 , gibze-i1rgl9 , gibze-i1rjp7 , gibze-i1s1q6 , gibze-i1ri35 , gibze-i1rf76 , gibze-i1rhp3 , fusc1-n4uj11 , fusc4-n1s9p6 , gibf5-s0dqr2 , gibm7-w7n1b5 , fusof-f9g6q0 , gibm7-w7n497 , fusox-x0bme4 , gibm7-w7mcf8 , gibm7-w7mak5 , fusox-x0a2c5 , gibm7-w7mum7 , fusox-w9iyc7 , gibm7-w7maw6 , gibm7-w7msi0 , gibm7-w7luf0 , gibm7-w7msa3 , gibm7-w7mna8 , gibm7-w7n8b7 , gibm7-w7n564 , fusox-w9jpi0 , gibm7-w7ngc3 , gibm7-w7m4v6 , gibm7-w7m4v2 , gibm7-w7lt61 , gibm7-w7mly6 , gibm7-w7ncn3 , fusox-w9ibd7 , fusof-f9fnm6 , gibm7-w7n526 , gibza-a0a016pda4 , gibza-a0a016pl96 , gibm7-w7muq1 , fusof-f9gfd3 , gibm7-w7mt52 , gibze-i1rjb5 , gibf5-s0ehu3 , fusox-w9hvf0 , gibze-i1rkc4 , gibm7-w7mv30 , gibze-a0a1c3ylb1 , fuso4-a0a0c4diy4 , gibm7-w7n4n0 , gibze-gra11 , gibze-fsl2 , gibf5-fub4 , gibf5-fub5 , gibf5-fus5 , gibm7-dlh1