Mukherjee M

References (5)

Title : Comparative genome sequence analysis underscores mycoparasitism as the ancestral life style of Trichoderma - Kubicek_2011_Genome.Biol_12_R40
Author(s) : Kubicek CP , Herrera-Estrella A , Seidl-Seiboth V , Martinez DA , Druzhinina IS , Thon M , Zeilinger S , Casas-Flores S , Horwitz BA , Mukherjee PK , Mukherjee M , Kredics L , Alcaraz LD , Aerts A , Antal Z , Atanasova L , Cervantes-Badillo MG , Challacombe J , Chertkov O , McCluskey K , Coulpier F , Deshpande N , von Dohren H , Ebbole DJ , Esquivel-Naranjo EU , Fekete E , Flipphi M , Glaser F , Gomez-Rodriguez EY , Gruber S , Han C , Henrissat B , Hermosa R , Hernandez-Onate M , Karaffa L , Kosti I , Le Crom S , Lindquist E , Lucas S , Lubeck M , Lubeck PS , Margeot A , Metz B , Misra M , Nevalainen H , Omann M , Packer N , Perrone G , Uresti-Rivera EE , Salamov A , Schmoll M , Seiboth B , Shapiro H , Sukno S , Tamayo-Ramos JA , Tisch D , Wiest A , Wilkinson HH , Zhang M , Coutinho PM , Kenerley CM , Monte E , Baker SE , Grigoriev IV
Ref : Genome Biol , 12 :R40 , 2011
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Mycoparasitism, a lifestyle where one fungus is parasitic on another fungus, has special relevance when the prey is a plant pathogen, providing a strategy for biological control of pests for plant protection. Probably, the most studied biocontrol agents are species of the genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma.
RESULTS: Here we report an analysis of the genome sequences of the two biocontrol species Trichoderma atroviride (teleomorph Hypocrea atroviridis) and Trichoderma virens (formerly Gliocladium virens, teleomorph Hypocrea virens), and a comparison with Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina). These three Trichoderma species display a remarkable conservation of gene order (78 to 96%), and a lack of active mobile elements probably due to repeat-induced point mutation. Several gene families are expanded in the two mycoparasitic species relative to T. reesei or other ascomycetes, and are overrepresented in non-syntenic genome regions. A phylogenetic analysis shows that T. reesei and T. virens are derived relative to T. atroviride. The mycoparasitism-specific genes thus arose in a common Trichoderma ancestor but were subsequently lost in T. reesei.
CONCLUSIONS: The data offer a better understanding of mycoparasitism, and thus enforce the development of improved biocontrol strains for efficient and environmentally friendly protection of plants.
ESTHER : Kubicek_2011_Genome.Biol_12_R40
PubMedSearch : Kubicek_2011_Genome.Biol_12_R40
PubMedID: 21501500
Gene_locus related to this paper: hypai-g9nem6 , hypai-g9ng36 , hypai-g9ngu2 , hypai-g9nks5 , hypai-g9nks6 , hypai-g9nqe5 , hypai-g9nqk5 , hypai-g9nrx6 , hypai-g9nsx1 , hypai-g9ntn3 , hypai-g9nzc9 , hypai-g9nzd7 , hypai-g9p1t1 , hypai-g9p1v2 , hypai-g9p2n8 , hypai-g9p4z2 , hypai-g9p878 , hypai-g9pa17 , hypai-g9pbz9 , hypvg-g9mem8 , hypvg-g9mg52 , hypvg-g9mga2 , hypvg-g9mhi3 , hypvg-g9mjc7 , hypvg-g9mk44 , hypvg-g9mms1 , hypvg-g9mnf0 , hypvg-g9mng3 , hypvg-g9mpt0 , hypvg-g9mrp9 , hypvg-g9ms16 , hypvg-g9ms32 , hypvg-g9msv5 , hypvg-g9muh6 , hypvg-g9muk0 , hypvg-g9mwe2 , hypvg-g9my79 , hypvg-g9n0p7 , hypvg-g9n2g3 , hypvg-g9n2g4 , hypvg-g9n4k5 , hypvg-g9n9n0 , hypvg-g9n561 , hypvg-g9n988 , hypvg-g9nb12 , hypvg-g9nb54 , hypvg-g9nbh8 , hypai-g9npz7 , hypai-g9njw6 , hypvg-g9mx08 , hypvg-g9mlt2 , hypai-g9p4j3 , hypvg-g9nbd3 , hypai-g9nxf6 , hypvg-g9n3y9 , hypvg-g9mgs4 , hypai-g9p6m2 , hypvg-g9my62 , hypvg-g9nbv2 , hypvg-g9my22 , hypai-g9p2e2 , hypai-g9p596 , hypai-g9nf87 , hypvg-g9me87 , hypvg-g9ndn9 , hypai-g9niy5 , hypai-g9ntx6 , hypvg-g9n3e7 , hypai-g9nu29 , hypvg-g9n2z0 , hypvg-g9ndf4 , 9hypo-a0a2p4zt82 , hypvg-g9n0g0 , hypvg-g9muj2 , hypvg-g9mud0 , hypai-g9nkx5

Title : Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium - Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
Author(s) : Ma LJ , van der Does HC , Borkovich KA , Coleman JJ , Daboussi MJ , Di Pietro A , Dufresne M , Freitag M , Grabherr M , Henrissat B , Houterman PM , Kang S , Shim WB , Woloshuk C , Xie X , Xu JR , Antoniw J , Baker SE , Bluhm BH , Breakspear A , Brown DW , Butchko RA , Chapman S , Coulson R , Coutinho PM , Danchin EG , Diener A , Gale LR , Gardiner DM , Goff S , Hammond-Kosack KE , Hilburn K , Hua-Van A , Jonkers W , Kazan K , Kodira CD , Koehrsen M , Kumar L , Lee YH , Li L , Manners JM , Miranda-Saavedra D , Mukherjee M , Park G , Park J , Park SY , Proctor RH , Regev A , Ruiz-Roldan MC , Sain D , Sakthikumar S , Sykes S , Schwartz DC , Turgeon BG , Wapinski I , Yoder O , Young S , Zeng Q , Zhou S , Galagan J , Cuomo CA , Kistler HC , Rep M
Ref : Nature , 464 :367 , 2010
Abstract : Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. To understand the molecular underpinnings of pathogenicity in the genus Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three phenotypically diverse species: Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes and account for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity, indicative of horizontal acquisition. Experimentally, we demonstrate the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, converting a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in F. oxysporum. These findings put the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.
ESTHER : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedSearch : Ma_2010_Nature_464_367
PubMedID: 20237561
Gene_locus related to this paper: fusox-a0a1d3s5h0 , gibf5-fus2 , fusof-f9f2k2 , fusof-f9f3l6 , fusof-f9f6t8 , fusof-f9f6v2 , fusof-f9f132 , fusof-f9f781 , fusof-f9fd72 , fusof-f9fd90 , fusof-f9fem0 , fusof-f9fhk2 , fusof-f9fj19 , fusof-f9fj20 , fusof-f9fki8 , fusof-f9fmx2 , fusof-f9fnt4 , fusof-f9fpy4 , fusof-f9fvs6 , fusof-f9fwu0 , fusof-f9fxz4 , fusof-f9fzy5 , fusof-f9g2a2 , fusof-f9g3b1 , fusof-f9g5h7 , fusof-f9g6e6 , fusof-f9g6y7 , fusof-f9g7b0 , fusof-f9g797 , fusof-f9g972 , fusof-f9ga50 , fusof-f9gck4 , fusof-f9gd15 , gibze-a8w610 , gibze-b1pdn0 , gibze-i1r9e6 , gibze-i1rda9 , gibze-i1rdk7 , gibze-i1rec8 , gibze-i1rgs0 , gibze-i1rgy0 , gibze-i1rh52 , gibze-i1rhi8 , gibze-i1rig9 , gibze-i1rip5 , gibze-i1rpg6 , gibze-i1rsg2 , gibze-i1rv36 , gibze-i1rxm5 , gibze-i1rxp8 , gibze-i1rxv5 , gibze-i1s1u3 , gibze-i1s3j9 , gibze-i1s6l7 , gibze-i1s8i8 , gibze-i1s9x4 , gibze-q4huy1 , gibze-i1rg17 , fuso4-j9mvr9 , fuso4-j9ngs6 , fuso4-j9niq8 , fuso4-j9nqm2 , gibze-i1rb76 , gibze-i1s1m7 , gibze-i1s3z6 , gibze-i1rd78 , gibze-i1rgl9 , gibze-i1rjp7 , gibze-i1s1q6 , gibze-i1ri35 , gibze-i1rf76 , gibze-i1rhp3 , fusc1-n4uj11 , fusc4-n1s9p6 , gibf5-s0dqr2 , gibm7-w7n1b5 , fusof-f9g6q0 , gibm7-w7n497 , fusox-x0bme4 , gibm7-w7mcf8 , gibm7-w7mak5 , fusox-x0a2c5 , gibm7-w7mum7 , fusox-w9iyc7 , gibm7-w7maw6 , gibm7-w7msi0 , gibm7-w7luf0 , gibm7-w7msa3 , gibm7-w7mna8 , gibm7-w7n8b7 , gibm7-w7n564 , fusox-w9jpi0 , gibm7-w7ngc3 , gibm7-w7m4v6 , gibm7-w7m4v2 , gibm7-w7lt61 , gibm7-w7mly6 , gibm7-w7ncn3 , fusox-w9ibd7 , fusof-f9fnm6 , gibm7-w7n526 , gibza-a0a016pda4 , gibza-a0a016pl96 , gibm7-w7muq1 , fusof-f9gfd3 , gibm7-w7mt52 , gibze-i1rjb5 , gibf5-s0ehu3 , fusox-w9hvf0 , gibze-i1rkc4 , gibm7-w7mv30 , gibze-a0a1c3ylb1 , fuso4-a0a0c4diy4 , gibm7-w7n4n0 , gibze-gra11 , gibze-fsl2 , gibf5-fub4 , gibf5-fub5 , gibf5-fus5 , gibm7-dlh1

Title : Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis - Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Hirt RP , Silva JC , Delcher AL , Schatz M , Zhao Q , Wortman JR , Bidwell SL , Alsmark UC , Besteiro S , Sicheritz-Ponten T , Noel CJ , Dacks JB , Foster PG , Simillion C , Van de Peer Y , Miranda-Saavedra D , Barton GJ , Westrop GD , Muller S , Dessi D , Fiori PL , Ren Q , Paulsen I , Zhang H , Bastida-Corcuera FD , Simoes-Barbosa A , Brown MT , Hayes RD , Mukherjee M , Okumura CY , Schneider R , Smith AJ , Vanacova S , Villalvazo M , Haas BJ , Pertea M , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Shu CL , Osoegawa K , de Jong PJ , Hrdy I , Horvathova L , Zubacova Z , Dolezal P , Malik SB , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Henze K , Gupta A , Wang CC , Dunne RL , Upcroft JA , Upcroft P , White O , Salzberg SL , Tang P , Chiu CH , Lee YS , Embley TM , Coombs GH , Mottram JC , Tachezy J , Fraser-Liggett CM , Johnson PJ
Ref : Science , 315 :207 , 2007
Abstract : We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the approximately 160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion, in conjunction with the shaping of metabolic pathways that likely transpired through lateral gene transfer from bacteria, and amplification of specific gene families implicated in pathogenesis and phagocytosis of host proteins may exemplify adaptations of the parasite during its transition to a urogenital environment. The genome sequence predicts previously unknown functions for the hydrogenosome, which support a common evolutionary origin of this unusual organelle with mitochondria.
ESTHER : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedID: 17218520
Gene_locus related to this paper: triva-a2d7i4 , triva-a2d9w5 , triva-a2d766 , triva-a2dah5 , triva-a2dlx9 , triva-a2dul1 , triva-a2dy49 , triva-a2e6h5 , triva-a2e7p9 , triva-a2e9l3 , triva-a2e414 , triva-a2e613 , triva-a2e983 , triva-a2eau8 , triva-a2ekb9 , triva-a2en58 , triva-a2erp5 , triva-a2et59 , triva-a2f7u4 , triva-a2f801 , triva-a2fa76 , triva-a2fbq3 , triva-a2fe47 , triva-a2fgl0 , triva-a2fhp7 , triva-a2fie6 , triva-a2fk22 , triva-a2fla2 , triva-a2fqm0 , triva-a2fqq2 , triva-a2frq0 , triva-a2frr3 , triva-a2fsq9 , triva-a2fsz5 , triva-a2fux4 , triva-a2fz57 , triva-a2g2h0 , triva-a2g9x0 , triva-a2fqi4

Title : Aqueous extract of black tea (Camellia sinensis) prevents ethanol+cholecystokinin-induced pancreatitis in a rat model - Das_2006_Life.Sci_78_2194
Author(s) : Das D , Mukherjee S , Das AS , Mukherjee M , Mitra C
Ref : Life Sciences , 78 :2194 , 2006
Abstract : Black Tea Extract (BTE), a phytocompound has been attributed with a plethora of health-promoting actions. We have previously demonstrated that BTE inhibits chronic hepatitis in a rat model induced with high-fat and ethanol (EtOH). This study reports that BTE prevents altered pancreatic acinar cell functions, oxidative stress, inflammatory changes and DNA damage in the EtOH+cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced model of pancreatitis. The EtOH+CCK model rats were administered with BTE, and were examined the activity of pancreatic digestive enzymes (amylase and lipase), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha), oxidative and antioxidative enzymes (nitric oxide, NO; malondialdehyde, MDA; superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT), antioxidant level (glutathione, GSH), histopathological changes and the integrity of genomic DNA. Results show that because of chronic EtOH treatment, serum level of amylase and lipase (two biomarkers for pancreatitis) and pancreatic levels of MDA and NO (two biomarkers of oxidative stress) increased significantly, which could be effectively blunted by BTE. BTE could normalize EtOH+CCK-induced suppressed activities of SOD and CAT, and GSH content of pancreatic tissue. Also, histopathological and inflammatory changes during EtOH+CCK-induced pancreatitis could be blunted by BTE. Furthermore, BTE could effectively reduce EtOH+CCK-induced increase in DNA fragmentation and damage. These findings suggest that BTE prevents pancreatitis caused by chronic EtOH+CCK toxicity presumably by enhancing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activity in rats.
ESTHER : Das_2006_Life.Sci_78_2194
PubMedSearch : Das_2006_Life.Sci_78_2194
PubMedID: 16289561

Title : Homologous expression of a mutated beta-tubulin gene does not confer benomyl resistance on Trichoderma virens - Mukherjee_2003_J.Appl.Microbiol_95_861
Author(s) : Mukherjee M , Hadar R , Mukherjee PK , Horwitz BA
Ref : J Appl Microbiol , 95 :861 , 2003
Abstract : AIMS: To clone the beta-tubulins and to induce resistance to benzimidazoles in the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens through site-directed mutagenesis. METHODS AND
RESULTS: Two beta-tubulin genes have been cloned using PCR amplification followed by the screening of a T. virens cDNA library. The full-length cDNA clones, coding for 445 and 446 amino acids, have been designated as T. virens tub1 and T. virens tub2. A sequence alignment of these two tubulins with tubulins from other filamentous fungi has shown the presence of some unique amino acid sequences not found in those positions in other beta-tubulins. Constitutive expression of the tub2 gene with a histidine to tyrosine substitution at position 6 (known to impart benomyl/methyl benzimadazol-2-yl carbamate resistance in other fungi), under the Pgpd promoter of Aspergillus nidulans, did not impart resistance to benomyl.
CONCLUSIONS: The homologous expression of tub2 gene with a histidine to tyrosine mutation at position +6, which is known to impart benomyl tolerance in other fungi, does not impart resistance in T. virens. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Unlike other Trichoderma spp., T. virens, has been difficult to mutate for benomyl tolerance. The present study, through site-directed mutagenesis, shows that a mutation known to impart benomyl tolerance in T. viride and other fungi does not impart resistance in this fungus. Understanding the mechanisms of this phenomenon will have a profound impact in plant-disease management, as many plant pathogenic fungi develop resistance to this group of fungicides forcing its withdrawal after a short period of use.
ESTHER : Mukherjee_2003_J.Appl.Microbiol_95_861
PubMedSearch : Mukherjee_2003_J.Appl.Microbiol_95_861
PubMedID: 12969302