Jones C

References (6)

Title : Positive effects of nicotine on cognition: the deployment of attention for prospective memory - Rusted_2009_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_202_93
Author(s) : Rusted JM , Sawyer R , Jones C , Trawley SL , Marchant NL
Ref : Psychopharmacology (Berl) , 202 :93 , 2009
Abstract : RATIONALE: Human and animal studies over the last two decades report that nicotine can improve cognitive performance. Prospective memory (PM), the retrieval and implementation of a previously encoded intention, is also improved by pre-administration of nicotine. As with other nicotine effects, however, predicting precisely how and when nicotine improves the processes engaged by PM has proved less straightforward. OBJECTIVE: We present two studies that explore the source of nicotine's enhancement of PM. Experiment 1 tests for effects of nicotine on preparatory attention (PA) for PM target detection. Experiment 2 asks whether nicotine enhances processing of the perceptual attributes of the PM targets. MATERIALS AND
METHODS: Young adult non-smokers matched on baseline performance measures received either 1 mg nicotine or matched placebo via nasal spray. Volunteers completed novel PM tasks at 15 min post-administration.
RESULTS: Experiment 1 confirmed that pre-administration of nicotine to non-smokers improved detection rate for prospective memory targets presented during an attention-demanding ongoing task. There was no relationship between PM performance and measures of preparatory attention. In experiment 2, salient targets were more likely to be detected than non-salient targets, but nicotine did not confer any additional advantage to salient targets. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that nicotinic stimulation does not work to enhance perceptual salience of target stimuli (experiment 2), nor does it work through better deployment of preparatory working attention (experiment 1). An alternative explanation that nicotine promotes PM detection by facilitating disengagement from the ongoing task is suggested as a future line of investigation.
ESTHER : Rusted_2009_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_202_93
PubMedSearch : Rusted_2009_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_202_93
PubMedID: 18815772

Title : The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1 - Gregory_2006_Nature_441_315
Author(s) : Gregory SG , Barlow KF , McLay KE , Kaul R , Swarbreck D , Dunham A , Scott CE , Howe KL , Woodfine K , Spencer CC , Jones MC , Gillson C , Searle S , Zhou Y , Kokocinski F , McDonald L , Evans R , Phillips K , Atkinson A , Cooper R , Jones C , Hall RE , Andrews TD , Lloyd C , Ainscough R , Almeida JP , Ambrose KD , Anderson F , Andrew RW , Ashwell RI , Aubin K , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Bailey J , Beasley H , Bethel G , Bird CP , Bray-Allen S , Brown JY , Brown AJ , Buckley D , Burton J , Bye J , Carder C , Chapman JC , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee C , Cobley V , Collier RE , Corby N , Coville GJ , Davies J , Deadman R , Dunn M , Earthrowl M , Ellington AG , Errington H , Frankish A , Frankland J , French L , Garner P , Garnett J , Gay L , Ghori MR , Gibson R , Gilby LM , Gillett W , Glithero RJ , Grafham DV , Griffiths C , Griffiths-Jones S , Grocock R , Hammond S , Harrison ES , Hart E , Haugen E , Heath PD , Holmes S , Holt K , Howden PJ , Hunt AR , Hunt SE , Hunter G , Isherwood J , James R , Johnson C , Johnson D , Joy A , Kay M , Kershaw JK , Kibukawa M , Kimberley AM , King A , Knights AJ , Lad H , Laird G , Lawlor S , Leongamornlert DA , Lloyd DM , Loveland J , Lovell J , Lush MJ , Lyne R , Martin S , Mashreghi-Mohammadi M , Matthews L , Matthews NS , Mclaren S , Milne S , Mistry S , Moore MJ , Nickerson T , O'Dell CN , Oliver K , Palmeiri A , Palmer SA , Parker A , Patel D , Pearce AV , Peck AI , Pelan S , Phelps K , Phillimore BJ , Plumb R , Rajan J , Raymond C , Rouse G , Saenphimmachak C , Sehra HK , Sheridan E , Shownkeen R , Sims S , Skuce CD , Smith M , Steward C , Subramanian S , Sycamore N , Tracey A , Tromans A , Van Helmond Z , Wall M , Wallis JM , White S , Whitehead SL , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams H , Wilming L , Wray PW , Wu Z , Coulson A , Vaudin M , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Wooster R , Dunham I , Carter NP , McVean G , Ross MT , Harrow J , Olson MV , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR , Banerjee R , Bryant SP , Burford DC , Burrill WD , Clegg SM , Dhami P , Dovey O , Faulkner LM , Gribble SM , Langford CF , Pandian RD , Porter KM , Prigmore E
Ref : Nature , 441 :315 , 2006
Abstract : The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome.
ESTHER : Gregory_2006_Nature_441_315
PubMedSearch : Gregory_2006_Nature_441_315
PubMedID: 16710414
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LYPLAL1 , human-PPT1 , human-TMCO4 , human-TMEM53

Title : Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15 - Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
Author(s) : Zody MC , Garber M , Sharpe T , Young SK , Rowen L , O'Neill K , Whittaker CA , Kamal M , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Kodira CD , Madan A , Qin S , Yang X , Abbasi N , Abouelleil A , Arachchi HM , Baradarani L , Birditt B , Bloom S , Bloom T , Borowsky ML , Burke J , Butler J , Cook A , DeArellano K , Decaprio D , Dorris L, 3rd , Dors M , Eichler EE , Engels R , Fahey J , Fleetwood P , Friedman C , Gearin G , Hall JL , Hensley G , Johnson E , Jones C , Kamat A , Kaur A , Locke DP , Munson G , Jaffe DB , Lui A , Macdonald P , Mauceli E , Naylor JW , Nesbitt R , Nicol R , O'Leary SB , Ratcliffe A , Rounsley S , She X , Sneddon KM , Stewart S , Sougnez C , Stone SM , Topham K , Vincent D , Wang S , Zimmer AR , Birren BW , Hood L , Lander ES , Nusbaum C
Ref : Nature , 440 :671 , 2006
Abstract : Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome.
ESTHER : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedSearch : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedID: 16572171
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-DPP8 , human-LIPC , human-SPG21

Title : Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog - Lindblad-Toh_2005_Nature_438_803
Author(s) : Lindblad-Toh K , Wade CM , Mikkelsen TS , Karlsson EK , Jaffe DB , Kamal M , Clamp M , Chang JL , Kulbokas EJ, 3rd , Zody MC , Mauceli E , Xie X , Breen M , Wayne RK , Ostrander EA , Ponting CP , Galibert F , Smith DR , deJong PJ , Kirkness E , Alvarez P , Biagi T , Brockman W , Butler J , Chin CW , Cook A , Cuff J , Daly MJ , Decaprio D , Gnerre S , Grabherr M , Kellis M , Kleber M , Bardeleben C , Goodstadt L , Heger A , Hitte C , Kim L , Koepfli KP , Parker HG , Pollinger JP , Searle SM , Sutter NB , Thomas R , Webber C , Baldwin J , Abebe A , Abouelleil A , Aftuck L , Ait-Zahra M , Aldredge T , Allen N , An P , Anderson S , Antoine C , Arachchi H , Aslam A , Ayotte L , Bachantsang P , Barry A , Bayul T , Benamara M , Berlin A , Bessette D , Blitshteyn B , Bloom T , Blye J , Boguslavskiy L , Bonnet C , Boukhgalter B , Brown A , Cahill P , Calixte N , Camarata J , Cheshatsang Y , Chu J , Citroen M , Collymore A , Cooke P , Dawoe T , Daza R , Decktor K , DeGray S , Dhargay N , Dooley K , Dorje P , Dorjee K , Dorris L , Duffey N , Dupes A , Egbiremolen O , Elong R , Falk J , Farina A , Faro S , Ferguson D , Ferreira P , Fisher S , FitzGerald M , Foley K , Foley C , Franke A , Friedrich D , Gage D , Garber M , Gearin G , Giannoukos G , Goode T , Goyette A , Graham J , Grandbois E , Gyaltsen K , Hafez N , Hagopian D , Hagos B , Hall J , Healy C , Hegarty R , Honan T , Horn A , Houde N , Hughes L , Hunnicutt L , Husby M , Jester B , Jones C , Kamat A , Kanga B , Kells C , Khazanovich D , Kieu AC , Kisner P , Kumar M , Lance K , Landers T , Lara M , Lee W , Leger JP , Lennon N , Leuper L , LeVine S , Liu J , Liu X , Lokyitsang Y , Lokyitsang T , Lui A , MacDonald J , Major J , Marabella R , Maru K , Matthews C , McDonough S , Mehta T , Meldrim J , Melnikov A , Meneus L , Mihalev A , Mihova T , Miller K , Mittelman R , Mlenga V , Mulrain L , Munson G , Navidi A , Naylor J , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nguyen C , Nicol R , Norbu N , Norbu C , Novod N , Nyima T , Olandt P , O'Neill B , O'Neill K , Osman S , Oyono L , Patti C , Perrin D , Phunkhang P , Pierre F , Priest M , Rachupka A , Raghuraman S , Rameau R , Ray V , Raymond C , Rege F , Rise C , Rogers J , Rogov P , Sahalie J , Settipalli S , Sharpe T , Shea T , Sheehan M , Sherpa N , Shi J , Shih D , Sloan J , Smith C , Sparrow T , Stalker J , Stange-Thomann N , Stavropoulos S , Stone C , Stone S , Sykes S , Tchuinga P , Tenzing P , Tesfaye S , Thoulutsang D , Thoulutsang Y , Topham K , Topping I , Tsamla T , Vassiliev H , Venkataraman V , Vo A , Wangchuk T , Wangdi T , Weiand M , Wilkinson J , Wilson A , Yadav S , Yang S , Yang X , Young G , Yu Q , Zainoun J , Zembek L , Zimmer A , Lander ES
Ref : Nature , 438 :803 , 2005
Abstract : Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris), together with a dense map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across breeds. The dog is of particular interest because it provides important evolutionary information and because existing breeds show great phenotypic diversity for morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. We use sequence comparison with the primate and rodent lineages to shed light on the structure and evolution of genomes and genes. Notably, the majority of the most highly conserved non-coding sequences in mammalian genomes are clustered near a small subset of genes with important roles in development. Analysis of SNPs reveals long-range haplotypes across the entire dog genome, and defines the nature of genetic diversity within and across breeds. The current SNP map now makes it possible for genome-wide association studies to identify genes responsible for diseases and traits, with important consequences for human and companion animal health.
ESTHER : Lindblad-Toh_2005_Nature_438_803
PubMedSearch : Lindblad-Toh_2005_Nature_438_803
PubMedID: 16341006
Gene_locus related to this paper: canfa-1lipg , canfa-2neur , canfa-3neur , canfa-ACHE , canfa-BCHE , canfa-cauxin , canfa-CESDD1 , canfa-e2qsb1 , canfa-e2qsl3 , canfa-e2qsz2 , canfa-e2qvk3 , canfa-e2qw15 , canfa-e2qxs8 , canfa-e2qzs6 , canfa-e2r5t3 , canfa-e2r6f6 , canfa-e2r7e8 , canfa-e2r8v9 , canfa-e2r8z1 , canfa-e2r9h4 , canfa-e2r455 , canfa-e2rb70 , canfa-e2rcq9 , canfa-e2rd94 , canfa-e2rgi0 , canfa-e2rkq0 , canfa-e2rlz9 , canfa-e2rm00 , canfa-e2rqf1 , canfa-e2rss9 , canfa-f1p6w8 , canfa-f1p8b6 , canfa-f1p9d8 , canfa-f1p683 , canfa-f1pb79 , canfa-f1pgw0 , canfa-f1phd0 , canfa-f1phx2 , canfa-f1pke8 , canfa-f1pp08 , canfa-f1ppp9 , canfa-f1ps07 , canfa-f1ptf1 , canfa-f1pvp4 , canfa-f1pw93 , canfa-f1pwk3 , canfa-pafa , canfa-q1ert3 , canfa-q5jzr0 , canfa-e2rmb9 , canlf-f6v865 , canlf-e2rjg6 , canlf-e2r2h2 , canlf-f1p648 , canlf-f1pw90 , canlf-j9p8v6 , canlf-f1pcc4 , canlf-e2qxh0 , canlf-e2r774 , canlf-f1pf96 , canlf-e2rq56 , canlf-j9nwb1 , canlf-f1ptw2 , canlf-j9p8h1 , canlf-e2ree2 , canlf-f1prs1 , canlf-j9nus1 , canlf-e2rf91 , canlf-f1pg57 , canlf-f1q111

Title : cDNA microarray analysis of genes associated with ERBB2 (HER2\/neu) overexpression in human mammary luminal epithelial cells - Mackay_2003_Oncogene_22_2680
Author(s) : Mackay A , Jones C , Dexter T , Silva RL , Bulmer K , Jones A , Simpson P , Harris RA , Jat PS , Neville AM , Reis LF , Lakhani SR , O'Hare MJ
Ref : Oncogene , 22 :2680 , 2003
Abstract : To investigate changes in gene expression associated with ERBB2, expression profiling of immortalized human mammary luminal epithelial cells and variants expressing a moderate and high level of ERBB2 has been carried out using cDNA microarrays corresponding to approximately 6000 unique genes/ESTs. A total of 61 significantly up- or downregulated (2.0-fold) genes were identified and further validated by RT-PCR analysis as well as microarray comparisons with a spontaneously ERBB2- overexpressing breast cancer cell line and ERBB2-positive primary breast tumors. The expression and clinical relevance of proteins predicted to be associated with ERBB2 overexpression in breast cancers were analysed together with their clinical relevance by antibody screening using a tissue array. Differentially regulated genes include those involved in cell-matrix interactions including proline 4-hydroxylase (P4HA2), galectin 1 (LGALS1) and galectin 3 (LGALS3), fibronectin 1 (FN1) and p-cadherin (CDH3), and cell proliferation (CRIP1, IGFBP3) and transformation (S100P, S100A4). A number of genes associated with MYC signalling were also differentially expressed, including NDRG1, USF2 and the epithelial membrane proteins 1 and 3 (EMP1, EMP3). These data represent profiles of the transcriptional changes associated with ERBB2-related pathways in the breast, and identify novel and potentially useful targets for prognosis and therapy.
ESTHER : Mackay_2003_Oncogene_22_2680
PubMedSearch : Mackay_2003_Oncogene_22_2680
PubMedID: 12730682

Title : Interaction of the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST) with target genes - Wood_2003_J.Mol.Biol_334_863
Author(s) : Wood IC , Belyaev ND , Bruce AW , Jones C , Mistry M , Roopra A , Buckley NJ
Ref : Journal of Molecular Biology , 334 :863 , 2003
Abstract : The repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST) has been proposed to restrict expression of repressor element 1 (RE1) bearing genes to differentiated neurons by silencing their expression in non-neural tissue. Here, we have examined the interaction of REST with the M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor gene. We show that REST binds to the RE1 of the M(4) gene in those cell lines and brain regions where the M(4) gene is expressed but not in those where the M(4) is not expressed. Furthermore, in cells that express M(4), the presence of REST represses but is insufficient to silence transcription of M(4). In non-neural cells REST is absent from the RE1 of the silent M(4) gene and perturbation of REST function fails to induce M(4) expression. We propose that REST acts to regulate expression levels of some RE1-bearing genes in neural cells, thereby playing an important role in defining neuronal activity.
ESTHER : Wood_2003_J.Mol.Biol_334_863
PubMedSearch : Wood_2003_J.Mol.Biol_334_863
PubMedID: 14643653