Engels R

References (8)

Title : Comparative genomics yields insights into niche adaptation of plant vascular wilt pathogens - Klosterman_2011_PLoS.Pathog_7_e1002137
Author(s) : Klosterman SJ , Subbarao KV , Kang S , Veronese P , Gold SE , Thomma BP , Chen Z , Henrissat B , Lee YH , Park J , Garcia-Pedrajas MD , Barbara DJ , Anchieta A , de Jonge R , Santhanam P , Maruthachalam K , Atallah Z , Amyotte SG , Paz Z , Inderbitzin P , Hayes RJ , Heiman DI , Young S , Zeng Q , Engels R , Galagan J , Cuomo CA , Dobinson KF , Ma LJ
Ref : PLoS Pathog , 7 :e1002137 , 2011
Abstract : The vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum infect over 200 plant species, causing billions of dollars in annual crop losses. The characteristic wilt symptoms are a result of colonization and proliferation of the pathogens in the xylem vessels, which undergo fluctuations in osmolarity. To gain insights into the mechanisms that confer the organisms' pathogenicity and enable them to proliferate in the unique ecological niche of the plant vascular system, we sequenced the genomes of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and compared them to each other, and to the genome of Fusarium oxysporum, another fungal wilt pathogen. Our analyses identified a set of proteins that are shared among all three wilt pathogens, and present in few other fungal species. One of these is a homolog of a bacterial glucosyltransferase that synthesizes virulence-related osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria. Pathogenicity tests of the corresponding V. dahliae glucosyltransferase gene deletion mutants indicate that the gene is required for full virulence in the Australian tobacco species Nicotiana benthamiana. Compared to other fungi, the two sequenced Verticillium genomes encode more pectin-degrading enzymes and other carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting an extraordinary capacity to degrade plant pectin barricades. The high level of synteny between the two Verticillium assemblies highlighted four flexible genomic islands in V. dahliae that are enriched for transposable elements, and contain duplicated genes and genes that are important in signaling/transcriptional regulation and iron/lipid metabolism. Coupled with an enhanced capacity to degrade plant materials, these genomic islands may contribute to the expanded genetic diversity and virulence of V. dahliae, the primary causal agent of Verticillium wilts. Significantly, our study reveals insights into the genetic mechanisms of niche adaptation of fungal wilt pathogens, advances our understanding of the evolution and development of their pathogenesis, and sheds light on potential avenues for the development of novel disease management strategies to combat destructive wilt diseases.
ESTHER : Klosterman_2011_PLoS.Pathog_7_e1002137
PubMedSearch : Klosterman_2011_PLoS.Pathog_7_e1002137
PubMedID: 21829347
Gene_locus related to this paper: vera1-c9srn2 , vera1-c9sn46 , verdv-g2wq49 , verdv-g2xca2 , vera1-c9sea3 , verdv-g2wzn4 , vera1-c9sek2 , verdv-g2wym5 , verdv-g2x5f3 , vera1-c9sx20 , vera1-c9sw01 , verdv-g2x1l1 , verdv-g2wuv4 , verdv-g2xaw5 , verdv-g2wsb2 , verdv-g2wty6 , vera1-c9si59 , verdv-g2xdu9 , vera1-c9s818 , verdv-g2xdr1 , verdv-g2wsw7 , verdv-g2wvq8 , 9pezi-a0a0g4li73 , vera1-kex1 , verdv-g2x8m5

Title : Genomic analysis of the basal lineage fungus Rhizopus oryzae reveals a whole-genome duplication - Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
Author(s) : Ma LJ , Ibrahim AS , Skory C , Grabherr MG , Burger G , Butler M , Elias M , Idnurm A , Lang BF , Sone T , Abe A , Calvo SE , Corrochano LM , Engels R , Fu J , Hansberg W , Kim JM , Kodira CD , Koehrsen MJ , Liu B , Miranda-Saavedra D , O'Leary S , Ortiz-Castellanos L , Poulter R , Rodriguez-Romero J , Ruiz-Herrera J , Shen YQ , Zeng Q , Galagan J , Birren BW , Cuomo CA , Wickes BL
Ref : PLoS Genet , 5 :e1000549 , 2009
Abstract : Rhizopus oryzae is the primary cause of mucormycosis, an emerging, life-threatening infection characterized by rapid angioinvasive growth with an overall mortality rate that exceeds 50%. As a representative of the paraphyletic basal group of the fungal kingdom called "zygomycetes," R. oryzae is also used as a model to study fungal evolution. Here we report the genome sequence of R. oryzae strain 99-880, isolated from a fatal case of mucormycosis. The highly repetitive 45.3 Mb genome assembly contains abundant transposable elements (TEs), comprising approximately 20% of the genome. We predicted 13,895 protein-coding genes not overlapping TEs, many of which are paralogous gene pairs. The order and genomic arrangement of the duplicated gene pairs and their common phylogenetic origin provide evidence for an ancestral whole-genome duplication (WGD) event. The WGD resulted in the duplication of nearly all subunits of the protein complexes associated with respiratory electron transport chains, the V-ATPase, and the ubiquitin-proteasome systems. The WGD, together with recent gene duplications, resulted in the expansion of multiple gene families related to cell growth and signal transduction, as well as secreted aspartic protease and subtilase protein families, which are known fungal virulence factors. The duplication of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway, especially the major azole target, lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11), could contribute to the variable responses of R. oryzae to different azole drugs, including voriconazole and posaconazole. Expanded families of cell-wall synthesis enzymes, essential for fungal cell integrity but absent in mammalian hosts, reveal potential targets for novel and R. oryzae-specific diagnostic and therapeutic treatments.
ESTHER : Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
PubMedSearch : Ma_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000549
PubMedID: 19578406

Title : Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome evolution - Mathee_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_3100
Author(s) : Mathee K , Narasimhan G , Valdes C , Qiu X , Matewish JM , Koehrsen M , Rokas A , Yandava CN , Engels R , Zeng E , Olavarietta R , Doud M , Smith RS , Montgomery P , White JR , Godfrey PA , Kodira C , Birren B , Galagan JE , Lory S
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 105 :3100 , 2008
Abstract : One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies. Here we report the complete sequence and comparative analysis of the genomes of two representative P. aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients whose genetic disorder predisposes them to infections by this pathogen. The comparison of the genomes of the two CF strains with those of other P. aeruginosa presents a picture of a mosaic genome, consisting of a conserved core component, interrupted in each strain by combinations of specific blocks of genes. These strain-specific segments of the genome are found in limited chromosomal locations, referred to as regions of genomic plasticity. The ability of P. aeruginosa to shape its genomic composition to favor survival in the widest range of environmental reservoirs, with corresponding enhancement of its metabolic capacity is supported by the identification of a genomic island in one of the sequenced CF isolates, encoding enzymes capable of degrading terpenoids produced by trees. This work suggests that niche adaptation is a major evolutionary force influencing the composition of bacterial genomes. Unlike genome reduction seen in host-adapted bacterial pathogens, the genetic capacity of P. aeruginosa is determined by the ability of individual strains to acquire or discard genomic segments, giving rise to strains with customized genomic repertoires. Consequently, this organism can survive in a wide range of environmental reservoirs that can serve as sources of the infecting organisms.
ESTHER : Mathee_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_3100
PubMedSearch : Mathee_2008_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_105_3100
PubMedID: 18287045
Gene_locus related to this paper: pseae-a3kt39 , pseae-a3l6v1 , pseae-clipa , pseae-CPO , pseae-llipa , pseae-metx , pseae-PA0201 , pseae-PA0231 , pseae-PA0308 , pseae-PA0368 , pseae-PA0480 , pseae-PA0502 , pseae-PA0543 , pseae-PA0599 , pseae-PA1166 , pseae-PA1239 , pseae-PA1291 , pseae-PA1304 , pseae-PA1510 , pseae-PA1558 , pseae-PA1597 , pseae-PA1990 , pseae-PA2086 , pseae-PA2098 , pseae-PA2302 , pseae-PA2425 , pseae-PA2451 , pseae-PA2540 , pseae-PA2682 , pseae-PA2689 , pseae-PA2745 , pseae-PA2764 , pseae-PA2927 , pseae-PA2934 , pseae-PA2949 , pseae-PA3132 , pseae-PA3301 , pseae-PA3324 , pseae-PA3327 , pseae-PA3429 , pseae-PA3586 , pseae-PA3628 , pseae-PA3695 , pseae-PA3859 , pseae-PA3994 , pseae-PA4152 , pseae-PA4968 , pseae-PA5080 , pseae-PHAC2 , pseae-phaD , pseae-phag , pseae-PVDD , pseae-Q8G8C7 , pseae-Q8G8T6 , pseae-Q9APW4 , pseae-rhla , pseae-q9i252

Title : Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15 - Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
Author(s) : Zody MC , Garber M , Sharpe T , Young SK , Rowen L , O'Neill K , Whittaker CA , Kamal M , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Kodira CD , Madan A , Qin S , Yang X , Abbasi N , Abouelleil A , Arachchi HM , Baradarani L , Birditt B , Bloom S , Bloom T , Borowsky ML , Burke J , Butler J , Cook A , DeArellano K , Decaprio D , Dorris L, 3rd , Dors M , Eichler EE , Engels R , Fahey J , Fleetwood P , Friedman C , Gearin G , Hall JL , Hensley G , Johnson E , Jones C , Kamat A , Kaur A , Locke DP , Munson G , Jaffe DB , Lui A , Macdonald P , Mauceli E , Naylor JW , Nesbitt R , Nicol R , O'Leary SB , Ratcliffe A , Rounsley S , She X , Sneddon KM , Stewart S , Sougnez C , Stone SM , Topham K , Vincent D , Wang S , Zimmer AR , Birren BW , Hood L , Lander ES , Nusbaum C
Ref : Nature , 440 :671 , 2006
Abstract : Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome.
ESTHER : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedSearch : Zody_2006_Nature_440_671
PubMedID: 16572171
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-DPP8 , human-LIPC , human-SPG21

Title : DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8 - Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
Author(s) : Nusbaum C , Mikkelsen TS , Zody MC , Asakawa S , Taudien S , Garber M , Kodira CD , Schueler MG , Shimizu A , Whittaker CA , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Yang X , Allen NR , Anderson S , Asakawa T , Blechschmidt K , Bloom T , Borowsky ML , Butler J , Cook A , Corum B , DeArellano K , Decaprio D , Dooley KT , Dorris L, 3rd , Engels R , Glockner G , Hafez N , Hagopian DS , Hall JL , Ishikawa SK , Jaffe DB , Kamat A , Kudoh J , Lehmann R , Lokitsang T , Macdonald P , Major JE , Matthews CD , Mauceli E , Menzel U , Mihalev AH , Minoshima S , Murayama Y , Naylor JW , Nicol R , Nguyen C , O'Leary SB , O'Neill K , Parker SC , Polley A , Raymond CK , Reichwald K , Rodriguez J , Sasaki T , Schilhabel M , Siddiqui R , Smith CL , Sneddon TP , Talamas JA , Tenzin P , Topham K , Venkataraman V , Wen G , Yamazaki S , Young SK , Zeng Q , Zimmer AR , Rosenthal A , Birren BW , Platzer M , Shimizu N , Lander ES
Ref : Nature , 439 :331 , 2006
Abstract : The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution.
ESTHER : Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
PubMedSearch : Nusbaum_2006_Nature_439_331
PubMedID: 16421571
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-TG

Title : DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18 - Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
Author(s) : Nusbaum C , Zody MC , Borowsky ML , Kamal M , Kodira CD , Taylor TD , Whittaker CA , Chang JL , Cuomo CA , Dewar K , Fitzgerald MG , Yang X , Abouelleil A , Allen NR , Anderson S , Bloom T , Bugalter B , Butler J , Cook A , Decaprio D , Engels R , Garber M , Gnirke A , Hafez N , Hall JL , Norman CH , Itoh T , Jaffe DB , Kuroki Y , Lehoczky J , Lui A , Macdonald P , Mauceli E , Mikkelsen TS , Naylor JW , Nicol R , Nguyen C , Noguchi H , O'Leary SB , O'Neill K , Piqani B , Smith CL , Talamas JA , Topham K , Totoki Y , Toyoda A , Wain HM , Young SK , Zeng Q , Zimmer AR , Fujiyama A , Hattori M , Birren BW , Sakaki Y , Lander ES
Ref : Nature , 437 :551 , 2005
Abstract : Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements.
ESTHER : Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
PubMedSearch : Nusbaum_2005_Nature_437_551
PubMedID: 16177791
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-LIPG

Title : The genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa - Galagan_2003_Nature_422_859
Author(s) : Galagan JE , Calvo SE , Borkovich KA , Selker EU , Read ND , Jaffe D , FitzHugh W , Ma LJ , Smirnov S , Purcell S , Rehman B , Elkins T , Engels R , Wang S , Nielsen CB , Butler J , Endrizzi M , Qui D , Ianakiev P , Bell-Pedersen D , Nelson MA , Werner-Washburne M , Selitrennikoff CP , Kinsey JA , Braun EL , Zelter A , Schulte U , Kothe GO , Jedd G , Mewes W , Staben C , Marcotte E , Greenberg D , Roy A , Foley K , Naylor J , Stange-Thomann N , Barrett R , Gnerre S , Kamal M , Kamvysselis M , Mauceli E , Bielke C , Rudd S , Frishman D , Krystofova S , Rasmussen C , Metzenberg RL , Perkins DD , Kroken S , Cogoni C , Macino G , Catcheside D , Li W , Pratt RJ , Osmani SA , DeSouza CP , Glass L , Orbach MJ , Berglund JA , Voelker R , Yarden O , Plamann M , Seiler S , Dunlap J , Radford A , Aramayo R , Natvig DO , Alex LA , Mannhaupt G , Ebbole DJ , Freitag M , Paulsen I , Sachs MS , Lander ES , Nusbaum C , Birren B
Ref : Nature , 422 :859 , 2003
Abstract : Neurospora crassa is a central organism in the history of twentieth-century genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology. Here, we report a high-quality draft sequence of the N. crassa genome. The approximately 40-megabase genome encodes about 10,000 protein-coding genes--more than twice as many as in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and only about 25% fewer than in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Analysis of the gene set yields insights into unexpected aspects of Neurospora biology including the identification of genes potentially associated with red light photobiology, genes implicated in secondary metabolism, and important differences in Ca2+ signalling as compared with plants and animals. Neurospora possesses the widest array of genome defence mechanisms known for any eukaryotic organism, including a process unique to fungi called repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). Genome analysis suggests that RIP has had a profound impact on genome evolution, greatly slowing the creation of new genes through genomic duplication and resulting in a genome with an unusually low proportion of closely related genes.
ESTHER : Galagan_2003_Nature_422_859
PubMedSearch : Galagan_2003_Nature_422_859
PubMedID: 12712197
Gene_locus related to this paper: neucr-5E6.090 , neucr-64C2.080 , neucr-90C4.300 , neucr-a7uw78 , neucr-a7uwh6 , neucr-a7uwy7 , neucr-apth1 , neucr-ATG15 , neucr-B7H23.190 , neucr-B11O8.160 , neucr-B13B3.090 , neucr-B14D6.130 , neucr-B18E6.050 , neucr-B19A17.360 , neucr-B23G1.090 , neucr-CBPYA , neucr-MET5 , neucr-NCU00292.1 , neucr-NCU00350.1 , neucr-NCU00536.1 , neucr-NCU00825.1 , neucr-NCU02148.1 , neucr-NCU02679.1 , neucr-NCU02904.1 , neucr-NCU02924.1 , neucr-NCU03158.1 , neucr-NCU04930.1 , neucr-NCU06332.1 , neucr-NCU06573.1 , neucr-NCU07081.1 , neucr-NCU07415.1 , neucr-NCU07909.1 , neucr-NCU08752.1 , neucr-NCU09575.1 , neucr-NCU10022.1 , neucr-ppme1 , neucr-q6mfs7 , neucr-q7rxb4 , neucr-q7rxv5 , neucr-q7ry06 , neucr-q7ryd2 , neucr-q7rzk2 , neucr-q7s0g7 , neucr-q7s1x0 , neucr-q7s2b3 , neucr-q7s2c5 , neucr-q7s2p4 , neucr-q7s2u9 , neucr-q7s3c6 , neucr-q7s3c8 , neucr-q7s3m2 , neucr-q7s4e3 , neucr-q7s4f8 , neucr-q7s4j4 , neucr-q7s5d6 , neucr-q7s5m2 , neucr-q7s5v8 , neucr-q7s6c5 , neucr-q7s8h2 , neucr-q7s070 , neucr-q7s082 , neucr-q7s134 , neucr-q7s216 , neucr-q7s259 , neucr-q7s260 , neucr-q7s283 , neucr-q7s512 , neucr-q7s736 , neucr-q7s828 , neucr-q7s897 , neucr-q7sbf9 , neucr-q7sbn0 , neucr-q7scr4 , neucr-q7sdw5 , neucr-q7sdx9 , neucr-q7se51 , neucr-q7sea3 , neucr-q7sez8 , neucr-q7sff7 , neucr-q7sga3 , neucr-q7sgj0 , neucr-q7sgp3 , neucr-q7sha3 , neucr-q7sha5 , neucr-q7shu8 , neucr-q9p6a7 , neucr-q872l1 , neucr-f5hbr2 , neucr-q7ry64

Title : The genome of M. acetivorans reveals extensive metabolic and physiological diversity - Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
Author(s) : Galagan JE , Nusbaum C , Roy A , Endrizzi MG , Macdonald P , FitzHugh W , Calvo S , Engels R , Smirnov S , Atnoor D , Brown A , Allen N , Naylor J , Stange-Thomann N , DeArellano K , Johnson R , Linton L , McEwan P , McKernan K , Talamas J , Tirrell A , Ye W , Zimmer A , Barber RD , Cann I , Graham DE , Grahame DA , Guss AM , Hedderich R , Ingram-Smith C , Kuettner HC , Krzycki JA , Leigh JA , Li W , Liu J , Mukhopadhyay B , Reeve JN , Smith K , Springer TA , Umayam LA , White O , White RH , Conway de Macario E , Ferry JG , Jarrell KF , Jing H , Macario AJ , Paulsen I , Pritchett M , Sowers KR , Swanson RV , Zinder SH , Lander E , Metcalf WW , Birren B
Ref : Genome Res , 12 :532 , 2002
Abstract : Methanogenesis, the biological production of methane, plays a pivotal role in the global carbon cycle and contributes significantly to global warming. The majority of methane in nature is derived from acetate. Here we report the complete genome sequence of an acetate-utilizing methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A. Methanosarcineae are the most metabolically diverse methanogens, thrive in a broad range of environments, and are unique among the Archaea in forming complex multicellular structures. This diversity is reflected in the genome of M. acetivorans. At 5,751,492 base pairs it is by far the largest known archaeal genome. The 4524 open reading frames code for a strikingly wide and unanticipated variety of metabolic and cellular capabilities. The presence of novel methyltransferases indicates the likelihood of undiscovered natural energy sources for methanogenesis, whereas the presence of single-subunit carbon monoxide dehydrogenases raises the possibility of nonmethanogenic growth. Although motility has not been observed in any Methanosarcineae, a flagellin gene cluster and two complete chemotaxis gene clusters were identified. The availability of genetic methods, coupled with its physiological and metabolic diversity, makes M. acetivorans a powerful model organism for the study of archaeal biology. [Sequence, data, annotations and analyses are available at http://www-genome.wi.mit.edu/.]
ESTHER : Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
PubMedSearch : Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
PubMedID: 11932238
Gene_locus related to this paper: metac-MA0077 , metac-MA0362 , metac-MA0419 , metac-MA0736 , metac-MA0993 , metac-MA1571 , metac-MA1856 , metac-MA1857 , metac-MA2002 , metac-MA2343 , metac-MA2629 , metac-MA2691 , metac-MA2743 , metac-MA2933 , metac-MA3611 , metac-MA3635 , metac-MA3920 , metac-META