Roberts A

References (6)

Title : ABHD12 and LPCAT3 Interplay Regulates a Lyso-phosphatidylserine-C20:4 Phosphatidylserine Lipid Network Implicated in Neurological Disease - Ichu_2020_Biochemistry_59_1793
Author(s) : Ichu TA , Reed A , Ogasawara D , Ulanovskaya O , Roberts A , Aguirre CA , Bar-Peled L , Gao J , Germain J , Barbas S , Masuda K , Conti B , Tontonoz P , Cravatt BF
Ref : Biochemistry , 59 :1793 , 2020
Abstract : PHARC (polyneuropathy, hearing loss, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and cataract) is a human neurological disorder caused by deleterious mutations in the ABHD12 gene, which encodes an integral membrane lyso-phosphatidylserine (lyso-PS) lipase. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of ABHD12 leads to higher levels of lyso-PS lipids in human cells and the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. ABHD12 loss also causes rapid rewiring of PS content, resulting in selective increases in the level of arachidonoyl (C20:4) PS and decreases in the levels of other PS species. The biochemical basis for ABHD12-dependent PS remodeling and its pathophysiological significance remain unknown. Here, we show that genetic deletion of the lysophospholipid acyltransferase LPCAT3 blocks accumulation of brain C20:4 PS in mice lacking ABHD12 and concurrently produces hyper-increases in the level of lyso-PS in these animals. These lipid changes correlate with exacerbated auditory dysfunction and brain microgliosis in mice lacking both ABHD12 and LPCAT3. Taken together, our findings reveal that ABHD12 and LPCAT3 coordinately regulate lyso-PS and C20:4 PS content in the CNS and point to lyso-PS lipids as the likely bioactive metabolites contributing to PHARC-related neuropathologies.
ESTHER : Ichu_2020_Biochemistry_59_1793
PubMedSearch : Ichu_2020_Biochemistry_59_1793
PubMedID: 32364701
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD12

Title : Selective blockade of the lyso-PS lipase ABHD12 stimulates immune responses in vivo - Ogasawara_2018_Nat.Chem.Biol_14_1099
Author(s) : Ogasawara D , Ichu TA , Vartabedian VF , Benthuysen J , Jing H , Reed A , Ulanovskaya OA , Hulce JJ , Roberts A , Brown S , Rosen H , Teijaro JR , Cravatt BF
Ref : Nat Chemical Biology , 14 :1099 , 2018
Abstract : ABHD12 metabolizes bioactive lysophospholipids, including lysophosphatidylserine (lyso-PS). Deleterious mutations in human ABHD12 cause the neurological disease PHARC, and ABHD12(-/-) mice display PHARC-like phenotypes, including hearing loss, along with elevated brain lyso-PS and features of stimulated innate immune cell function. Here, we develop a selective and in vivo-active inhibitor of ABHD12 termed DO264 and show that this compound elevates lyso-PS in mouse brain and primary human macrophages. Unlike ABHD12(-/-) mice, adult mice treated with DO264 exhibited minimal perturbations in auditory function. On the other hand, both DO264-treated and ABHD12(-/-) mice displayed heightened immunological responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 infection that manifested as severe lung pathology with elevated proinflammatory chemokines. These results reveal similarities and differences in the phenotypic impact of pharmacological versus genetic blockade of ABHD12 and point to a key role for this enzyme in regulating immunostimulatory lipid pathways in vivo.
ESTHER : Ogasawara_2018_Nat.Chem.Biol_14_1099
PubMedSearch : Ogasawara_2018_Nat.Chem.Biol_14_1099
PubMedID: 30420694
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD12

Title : Poster: Mice lacking the beta4 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor show memory deficits, altered anxiety- and depression-like behavior, and diminished nicotine-induced analgesia -
Author(s) : Vlachou S , Semenova S , Contet C , Roberts A , Markou A
Ref : Biochemical Pharmacology , 82 :1038 , 2011
PubMedID:

Title : Immobilization of active human carboxylesterase 1 in biomimetic silica nanoparticles - Edwards_2011_Biotechnol.Prog_27_863
Author(s) : Edwards JS , Kumbhar A , Roberts A , Hemmert AC , Edwards CC , Potter PM , Redinbo MR
Ref : Biotechnol Prog , 27 :863 , 2011
Abstract : The encapsulation of proteins in biomimetic silica has recently been shown to successfully maintain enzymes in their active state. Organophosphate (OP) compounds are used as pesticides as well as potent chemical warfare nerve agents. Because these toxicants are life threatening, we sought to generate biomimetic silicas capable of responding to OPs. Here, we present the silica encapsulation of human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) in the presence of a range of catalysts. hCE1 was successfully encapsulated into silica particles when lysozyme or the peptide R5 were used as catalysts; in contrast, polyethyleneimine, a catalyst used to encapuslate other enzymes, did not facilitate hCE1 entrapment. hCE1 silica particles in a column chromatography format respond to the presence of the OP pesticides paraoxon and dimethyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate in solution. These results may lead to novel approaches to detect OP pesticides or other weaponized agents that bind hCE1.
ESTHER : Edwards_2011_Biotechnol.Prog_27_863
PubMedSearch : Edwards_2011_Biotechnol.Prog_27_863
PubMedID: 21509954

Title : The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution - Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Tellam RL , Worley KC , Gibbs RA , Muzny DM , Weinstock GM , Adelson DL , Eichler EE , Elnitski L , Guigo R , Hamernik DL , Kappes SM , Lewin HA , Lynn DJ , Nicholas FW , Reymond A , Rijnkels M , Skow LC , Zdobnov EM , Schook L , Womack J , Alioto T , Antonarakis SE , Astashyn A , Chapple CE , Chen HC , Chrast J , Camara F , Ermolaeva O , Henrichsen CN , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Kokocinski F , Landrum M , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Searle SM , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Ucla C , Wyss C , Anzola JM , Gerlach D , Elhaik E , Graur D , Reese JT , Edgar RC , McEwan JC , Payne GM , Raison JM , Junier T , Kriventseva EV , Eyras E , Plass M , Donthu R , Larkin DM , Reecy J , Yang MQ , Chen L , Cheng Z , Chitko-McKown CG , Liu GE , Matukumalli LK , Song J , Zhu B , Bradley DG , Brinkman FS , Lau LP , Whiteside MD , Walker A , Wheeler TT , Casey T , German JB , Lemay DG , Maqbool NJ , Molenaar AJ , Seo S , Stothard P , Baldwin CL , Baxter R , Brinkmeyer-Langford CL , Brown WC , Childers CP , Connelley T , Ellis SA , Fritz K , Glass EJ , Herzig CT , Iivanainen A , Lahmers KK , Bennett AK , Dickens CM , Gilbert JG , Hagen DE , Salih H , Aerts J , Caetano AR , Dalrymple B , Garcia JF , Gill CA , Hiendleder SG , Memili E , Spurlock D , Williams JL , Alexander L , Brownstein MJ , Guan L , Holt RA , Jones SJ , Marra MA , Moore R , Moore SS , Roberts A , Taniguchi M , Waterman RC , Chacko J , Chandrabose MM , Cree A , Dao MD , Dinh HH , Gabisi RA , Hines S , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Kovar CL , Lewis LR , Liu YS , Lopez J , Morgan MB , Nguyen NB , Okwuonu GO , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Wright RA , Buhay C , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Herdandez J , Holder M , Sabo A , Egan A , Goodell J , Wilczek-Boney K , Fowler GR , Hitchens ME , Lozado RJ , Moen C , Steffen D , Warren JT , Zhang J , Chiu R , Schein JE , Durbin KJ , Havlak P , Jiang H , Liu Y , Qin X , Ren Y , Shen Y , Song H , Bell SN , Davis C , Johnson AJ , Lee S , Nazareth LV , Patel BM , Pu LL , Vattathil S , Williams RL, Jr. , Curry S , Hamilton C , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Barris W , Bennett GL , Eggen A , Green RD , Harhay GP , Hobbs M , Jann O , Keele JW , Kent MP , Lien S , McKay SD , McWilliam S , Ratnakumar A , Schnabel RD , Smith T , Snelling WM , Sonstegard TS , Stone RT , Sugimoto Y , Takasuga A , Taylor JF , Van Tassell CP , Macneil MD , Abatepaulo AR , Abbey CA , Ahola V , Almeida IG , Amadio AF , Anatriello E , Bahadue SM , Biase FH , Boldt CR , Carroll JA , Carvalho WA , Cervelatti EP , Chacko E , Chapin JE , Cheng Y , Choi J , Colley AJ , de Campos TA , De Donato M , Santos IK , de Oliveira CJ , Deobald H , Devinoy E , Donohue KE , Dovc P , Eberlein A , Fitzsimmons CJ , Franzin AM , Garcia GR , Genini S , Gladney CJ , Grant JR , Greaser ML , Green JA , Hadsell DL , Hakimov HA , Halgren R , Harrow JL , Hart EA , Hastings N , Hernandez M , Hu ZL , Ingham A , Iso-Touru T , Jamis C , Jensen K , Kapetis D , Kerr T , Khalil SS , Khatib H , Kolbehdari D , Kumar CG , Kumar D , Leach R , Lee JC , Li C , Logan KM , Malinverni R , Marques E , Martin WF , Martins NF , Maruyama SR , Mazza R , McLean KL , Medrano JF , Moreno BT , More DD , Muntean CT , Nandakumar HP , Nogueira MF , Olsaker I , Pant SD , Panzitta F , Pastor RC , Poli MA , Poslusny N , Rachagani S , Ranganathan S , Razpet A , Riggs PK , Rincon G , Rodriguez-Osorio N , Rodriguez-Zas SL , Romero NE , Rosenwald A , Sando L , Schmutz SM , Shen L , Sherman L , Southey BR , Lutzow YS , Sweedler JV , Tammen I , Telugu BP , Urbanski JM , Utsunomiya YT , Verschoor CP , Waardenberg AJ , Wang Z , Ward R , Weikard R , Welsh TH, Jr. , White SN , Wilming LG , Wunderlich KR , Yang J , Zhao FQ
Ref : Science , 324 :522 , 2009
Abstract : To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
ESTHER : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedID: 19390049
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-2neur , bovin-a0jnh8 , bovin-a5d7b7 , bovin-ACHE , bovin-balip , bovin-dpp4 , bovin-dpp6 , bovin-e1bi31 , bovin-e1bn79 , bovin-est8 , bovin-f1mbd6 , bovin-f1mi11 , bovin-f1mr65 , bovin-f1n1l4 , bovin-g3mxp5 , bovin-q0vcc8 , bovin-q2kj30 , bovin-q3t0r6 , bovin-thyro

Title : Cholinergic contribution to excitation in a spinal locomotor central pattern generator in Xenopus embryos - Perrins_1995_J.Neurophysiol_73_1013
Author(s) : Perrins R , Roberts A
Ref : Journal of Neurophysiology , 73 :1013 , 1995
Abstract : 1. We have investigated whether in Xenopus embryos, spinal interneurons of the central pattern generator (CPG) receive cholinergic or electrical excitatory input during swimming. The functions of cholinergic excitation during swimming were also investigated. 2. Intracellular recordings were made from rhythmically active presumed premotor interneurons in the dorsal third of the spinal cord. After locally blocking inhibitory potentials with 2 microM strychnine and 40 microM bicuculline, the reliability of spike firing and the amplitude of fast, on-cycle, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) underlying the single on-cycle spikes were measured during fictive swimming. 3. The nicotinic antagonists d-tubocurarine and dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E, both 10 microM) reversibly reduced the reliability of the spike firing during swimming and reduced the amplitude of the on-cycle EPSP by 16%. DH beta E also reduced the EPSP amplitude in spinalized embryos by 22%. These results indicate that interneurons receive rhythmic cholinergic excitation from a source within the spinal cord. 4. Combined applications of nicotinic and excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonists or cadmium (Cd2+, 100-200 microM) resulted in complete block of the fast EPSP, suggesting that interneurons do not receive electrical excitation. 5. The nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine and d-tubocurarine (both 5 microM) reduced the duration of episodes of fictive swimming recorded from the ventral roots, in spinal embryos. When applied in the middle of a long episode, d-tubocurarine decreased the swimming frequency, ruling out an effect on the initiation pathway. The cholinesterase inhibitor eserine (10 microM) increased the duration of swimming episodes
ESTHER : Perrins_1995_J.Neurophysiol_73_1013
PubMedSearch : Perrins_1995_J.Neurophysiol_73_1013
PubMedID: 7608751