Smith T

References (7)

Title : Evidence of superclones in Australian cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover (Aphididae: Hemiptera) - Chen_2013_Pest.Manag.Sci_69_938
Author(s) : Chen Y , Vanlerberghe-Masutti F , Wilson LJ , Barchia I , McLoon MO , Smith T , Herron GA
Ref : Pest Manag Sci , 69 :938 , 2013
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Aphis gossypii is an important pest of cotton that has developed resistance to many chemicals used for its control. Any lack of understanding of its genetic structure, resistance status and host plant specialisation hampers effective management. RSULTS: Eight microsatellite markers were genotyped for a collection of Australian A. gossypii field isolates from 55 plant species from major Australian cotton-producing regions. The aphid's pirimicarb resistance status linked to the ACE1 (acetylcholinesterase) S431F mutation was determined by PCR-RFLP. Overall, the genetic diversity was low and there were only 13 multilocus genotype (MLG) groups found in a total of 936 aphids, suggesting asexual reproduction. Three MLGs (Aust-01, Aust-02 and Aust-04) represented 78% of all aphids tested. MLGs Aust-01 (41%) and Aust-02 (18%) were linked to the ACE1 S431F mutation and found on cotton and a range of hosts. Aust-04 (19%) hosted mainly on cotton (but also Asteraceae and Malvaceae) was predominantly susceptible to pirimicarb. Given their abundance and widespread occurrence, these three clones were considered to be superclones. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that any strategy to control A. gossypii and manage pirimicarb resistance should target A. gossypii strains of all MLG types residing on any plant species and not just cotton.(c) 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.
ESTHER : Chen_2013_Pest.Manag.Sci_69_938
PubMedSearch : Chen_2013_Pest.Manag.Sci_69_938
PubMedID: 23292942

Title : The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution - Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Tellam RL , Worley KC , Gibbs RA , Muzny DM , Weinstock GM , Adelson DL , Eichler EE , Elnitski L , Guigo R , Hamernik DL , Kappes SM , Lewin HA , Lynn DJ , Nicholas FW , Reymond A , Rijnkels M , Skow LC , Zdobnov EM , Schook L , Womack J , Alioto T , Antonarakis SE , Astashyn A , Chapple CE , Chen HC , Chrast J , Camara F , Ermolaeva O , Henrichsen CN , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Kokocinski F , Landrum M , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Searle SM , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Ucla C , Wyss C , Anzola JM , Gerlach D , Elhaik E , Graur D , Reese JT , Edgar RC , McEwan JC , Payne GM , Raison JM , Junier T , Kriventseva EV , Eyras E , Plass M , Donthu R , Larkin DM , Reecy J , Yang MQ , Chen L , Cheng Z , Chitko-McKown CG , Liu GE , Matukumalli LK , Song J , Zhu B , Bradley DG , Brinkman FS , Lau LP , Whiteside MD , Walker A , Wheeler TT , Casey T , German JB , Lemay DG , Maqbool NJ , Molenaar AJ , Seo S , Stothard P , Baldwin CL , Baxter R , Brinkmeyer-Langford CL , Brown WC , Childers CP , Connelley T , Ellis SA , Fritz K , Glass EJ , Herzig CT , Iivanainen A , Lahmers KK , Bennett AK , Dickens CM , Gilbert JG , Hagen DE , Salih H , Aerts J , Caetano AR , Dalrymple B , Garcia JF , Gill CA , Hiendleder SG , Memili E , Spurlock D , Williams JL , Alexander L , Brownstein MJ , Guan L , Holt RA , Jones SJ , Marra MA , Moore R , Moore SS , Roberts A , Taniguchi M , Waterman RC , Chacko J , Chandrabose MM , Cree A , Dao MD , Dinh HH , Gabisi RA , Hines S , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Kovar CL , Lewis LR , Liu YS , Lopez J , Morgan MB , Nguyen NB , Okwuonu GO , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Wright RA , Buhay C , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Herdandez J , Holder M , Sabo A , Egan A , Goodell J , Wilczek-Boney K , Fowler GR , Hitchens ME , Lozado RJ , Moen C , Steffen D , Warren JT , Zhang J , Chiu R , Schein JE , Durbin KJ , Havlak P , Jiang H , Liu Y , Qin X , Ren Y , Shen Y , Song H , Bell SN , Davis C , Johnson AJ , Lee S , Nazareth LV , Patel BM , Pu LL , Vattathil S , Williams RL, Jr. , Curry S , Hamilton C , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Barris W , Bennett GL , Eggen A , Green RD , Harhay GP , Hobbs M , Jann O , Keele JW , Kent MP , Lien S , McKay SD , McWilliam S , Ratnakumar A , Schnabel RD , Smith T , Snelling WM , Sonstegard TS , Stone RT , Sugimoto Y , Takasuga A , Taylor JF , Van Tassell CP , Macneil MD , Abatepaulo AR , Abbey CA , Ahola V , Almeida IG , Amadio AF , Anatriello E , Bahadue SM , Biase FH , Boldt CR , Carroll JA , Carvalho WA , Cervelatti EP , Chacko E , Chapin JE , Cheng Y , Choi J , Colley AJ , de Campos TA , De Donato M , Santos IK , de Oliveira CJ , Deobald H , Devinoy E , Donohue KE , Dovc P , Eberlein A , Fitzsimmons CJ , Franzin AM , Garcia GR , Genini S , Gladney CJ , Grant JR , Greaser ML , Green JA , Hadsell DL , Hakimov HA , Halgren R , Harrow JL , Hart EA , Hastings N , Hernandez M , Hu ZL , Ingham A , Iso-Touru T , Jamis C , Jensen K , Kapetis D , Kerr T , Khalil SS , Khatib H , Kolbehdari D , Kumar CG , Kumar D , Leach R , Lee JC , Li C , Logan KM , Malinverni R , Marques E , Martin WF , Martins NF , Maruyama SR , Mazza R , McLean KL , Medrano JF , Moreno BT , More DD , Muntean CT , Nandakumar HP , Nogueira MF , Olsaker I , Pant SD , Panzitta F , Pastor RC , Poli MA , Poslusny N , Rachagani S , Ranganathan S , Razpet A , Riggs PK , Rincon G , Rodriguez-Osorio N , Rodriguez-Zas SL , Romero NE , Rosenwald A , Sando L , Schmutz SM , Shen L , Sherman L , Southey BR , Lutzow YS , Sweedler JV , Tammen I , Telugu BP , Urbanski JM , Utsunomiya YT , Verschoor CP , Waardenberg AJ , Wang Z , Ward R , Weikard R , Welsh TH, Jr. , White SN , Wilming LG , Wunderlich KR , Yang J , Zhao FQ
Ref : Science , 324 :522 , 2009
Abstract : To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
ESTHER : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedID: 19390049
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-2neur , bovin-a0jnh8 , bovin-a5d7b7 , bovin-ACHE , bovin-balip , bovin-dpp4 , bovin-dpp6 , bovin-e1bi31 , bovin-e1bn79 , bovin-est8 , bovin-f1mbd6 , bovin-f1mi11 , bovin-f1mr65 , bovin-f1n1l4 , bovin-g3mxp5 , bovin-q0vcc8 , bovin-q2kj30 , bovin-q3t0r6 , bovin-thyro

Title : Paraoxonase and susceptibility to organophosphorus poisoning in farmers dipping sheep - Mackness_2003_Pharmacogenet_13_81
Author(s) : Mackness B , Durrington P , Povey A , Thomson S , Dippnall M , Mackness MI , Smith T , Cherry N
Ref : Pharmacogenetics , 13 :81 , 2003
Abstract : OBJECTIVES: Human serum paraoxonase (PON1) hydrolyses organophosphate pesticides (OPs) entering the blood circulation and tissue fluid thus limiting toxicity. The PON1 coding region has two polymorphisms involving the amino acids at position 55 (Lt<--M) and 192 (Qt<--R), giving rise to isoenzymes which differ in their catalytic rate for the hydrolysis of OPs. We therefore hypothesized that individuals inheriting low activity isoforms of PON1 would be more liable to report symptoms of OP toxicity.
METHODS: We have therefore investigated the relationship between PON1 genetic polymorphisms and PON1 activity in farmers reporting chronic ill health which they attributed to OP exposure whilst sheep dipping (cases) and farmers who carried out similar activities, but remained well (controls). Diazoxon, paraoxon and phenylacetate were used as substrates for PON1. Diazoxon is the active metabolite of diazinon, the sheep dip most commonly used in the UK.
RESULTS: Cases were found to be more likely to have the R192 allele ( 0.01) and to have the L55 allele ( 0.05) than the controls. This combination of R and L genotypes was associated with lower PON1 activity towards diazoxon in both cases and controls. Farmers in the lowest quintile for the rate of serum diazoxon hydrolysis had a greater risk of being a case i.e. of reporting ill health (odds ratio 2.47 (95% CI 1.35-2.82)), than the other four quintiles of diazoxon hydrolysis. The rate of serum hydrolysis of paraoxon was greatest in cases and controls with the R/L haplotype (both 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: The farmers reporting chronic ill health due to organophosphate exposure have a higher proportion of the PON1-192R polymorphism associated with lower rates of diazoxon hydrolysis and lower rates of diazoxon hydrolysis than the controls and that their ill health may be explained by a lower ability to detoxify diazoxon.
ESTHER : Mackness_2003_Pharmacogenet_13_81
PubMedSearch : Mackness_2003_Pharmacogenet_13_81
PubMedID: 12563177

Title : Paraoxonase (PON1) polymorphisms in farmers attributing ill health to sheep dip - Cherry_2002_Lancet_359_763
Author(s) : Cherry N , Mackness M , Durrington P , Povey A , Dippnall M , Smith T , Mackness B
Ref : Lancet , 359 :763 , 2002
Abstract : Human serum paraoxonase (PON1) hydrolyses diazinonoxon, the active metabolite of diazinon, which is an organophosphate used in sheep dip. In a case-referent study, 175 farmers with ill health that they attributed to sheep dip nominated 234 referent farmers who also dipped sheep and whom they believed to be in good health. We calculated odds ratios for polymorphisms in PON1 at positions 192 and 55, and for PON1 activity with diazinonoxon as substrate. Cases were more likely than referents to have at least one R allele at position 192 (glutamine to arginine aminoacid substitution; odds ratio 1.93, 95% CI 1.24-3.01), both alleles of type LL (1.70, 1.07-2.68) at position 55, and to have diazoxonase activity below normal median (1.77, 1.18-2.67). Our results support the hypothesis that organophosphates contribute to the reported ill health of people who dip sheep.
ESTHER : Cherry_2002_Lancet_359_763
PubMedSearch : Cherry_2002_Lancet_359_763
PubMedID: 11888590

Title : Effects of hormone replacement therapy on olfactory sensitivity: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies - Hughes_2002_Climacteric_5_140
Author(s) : Hughes LF , McAsey ME , Donathan CL , Smith T , Coney P , Struble RG
Ref : Climacteric , 5 :140 , 2002
Abstract : OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hormone replacement therapy (HRT) preserved or improved olfactory sensitivity in healthy postmenopausal women.
METHODS: Sixty-two postmenopausal women participated in a cross-sectional study of olfactory sensitivity involving detection, intensity discrimination, quality discrimination and two measures of quality recognition. In addition, 24 postmenopausal women participated in a longitudinal study of olfactory sensitivity. This study allowed for the measurement of estrogen effects (while holding practice effects constant) and the measurement of practice effects (while holding HRT conditions constant).
RESULTS: In the cross-sectional study, we were unable to detect any differences between those receiving HRT and those not receiving HRT. Duration of exposure to HRT was examined by selecting women who had 5 or more years of exposure to their HRT regimen. Even after the data were reorganized into those for opposed- and unopposed-estrogen use, we were unable to detect any differences. However, olfactory threshold increased as a function of increasing age, regardless of HRT status. A gradual decrease in ability to detect odors was observed from the 4th to the 6th decade, with a greater decrease between the 6th and 7th decades. In the longitudinal study, no effects of HRT were detected even when practice effects were uncontrolled. Practice effects were assessed both between and within subjects. No effects of practice were detected when initial baseline performance was used as a covariate. CONCLUSION: Although prophylactic HRT has been suggested to be associated with improved olfactory function, we find that its use in healthy postmenopausal women does not enhance performance in a wide range of olfactory tasks.
ESTHER : Hughes_2002_Climacteric_5_140
PubMedSearch : Hughes_2002_Climacteric_5_140
PubMedID: 12051109

Title : The sequence of the human genome - Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
Author(s) : Venter JC , Adams MD , Myers EW , Li PW , Mural RJ , Sutton GG , Smith HO , Yandell M , Evans CA , Holt RA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides P , Ballew RM , Huson DH , Wortman JR , Zhang Q , Kodira CD , Zheng XH , Chen L , Skupski M , Subramanian G , Thomas PD , Zhang J , Gabor Miklos GL , Nelson C , Broder S , Clark AG , Nadeau J , McKusick VA , Zinder N , Levine AJ , Roberts RJ , Simon M , Slayman C , Hunkapiller M , Bolanos R , Delcher A , Dew I , Fasulo D , Flanigan M , Florea L , Halpern A , Hannenhalli S , Kravitz S , Levy S , Mobarry C , Reinert K , Remington K , Abu-Threideh J , Beasley E , Biddick K , Bonazzi V , Brandon R , Cargill M , Chandramouliswaran I , Charlab R , Chaturvedi K , Deng Z , Di Francesco V , Dunn P , Eilbeck K , Evangelista C , Gabrielian AE , Gan W , Ge W , Gong F , Gu Z , Guan P , Heiman TJ , Higgins ME , Ji RR , Ke Z , Ketchum KA , Lai Z , Lei Y , Li Z , Li J , Liang Y , Lin X , Lu F , Merkulov GV , Milshina N , Moore HM , Naik AK , Narayan VA , Neelam B , Nusskern D , Rusch DB , Salzberg S , Shao W , Shue B , Sun J , Wang Z , Wang A , Wang X , Wang J , Wei M , Wides R , Xiao C , Yan C , Yao A , Ye J , Zhan M , Zhang W , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhong F , Zhong W , Zhu S , Zhao S , Gilbert D , Baumhueter S , Spier G , Carter C , Cravchik A , Woodage T , Ali F , An H , Awe A , Baldwin D , Baden H , Barnstead M , Barrow I , Beeson K , Busam D , Carver A , Center A , Cheng ML , Curry L , Danaher S , Davenport L , Desilets R , Dietz S , Dodson K , Doup L , Ferriera S , Garg N , Gluecksmann A , Hart B , Haynes J , Haynes C , Heiner C , Hladun S , Hostin D , Houck J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Johnson J , Kalush F , Kline L , Koduru S , Love A , Mann F , May D , McCawley S , McIntosh T , McMullen I , Moy M , Moy L , Murphy B , Nelson K , Pfannkoch C , Pratts E , Puri V , Qureshi H , Reardon M , Rodriguez R , Rogers YH , Romblad D , Ruhfel B , Scott R , Sitter C , Smallwood M , Stewart E , Strong R , Suh E , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tse S , Vech C , Wang G , Wetter J , Williams S , Williams M , Windsor S , Winn-Deen E , Wolfe K , Zaveri J , Zaveri K , Abril JF , Guigo R , Campbell MJ , Sjolander KV , Karlak B , Kejariwal A , Mi H , Lazareva B , Hatton T , Narechania A , Diemer K , Muruganujan A , Guo N , Sato S , Bafna V , Istrail S , Lippert R , Schwartz R , Walenz B , Yooseph S , Allen D , Basu A , Baxendale J , Blick L , Caminha M , Carnes-Stine J , Caulk P , Chiang YH , Coyne M , Dahlke C , Mays A , Dombroski M , Donnelly M , Ely D , Esparham S , Fosler C , Gire H , Glanowski S , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gorokhov M , Graham K , Gropman B , Harris M , Heil J , Henderson S , Hoover J , Jennings D , Jordan C , Jordan J , Kasha J , Kagan L , Kraft C , Levitsky A , Lewis M , Liu X , Lopez J , Ma D , Majoros W , McDaniel J , Murphy S , Newman M , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nodell M , Pan S , Peck J , Peterson M , Rowe W , Sanders R , Scott J , Simpson M , Smith T , Sprague A , Stockwell T , Turner R , Venter E , Wang M , Wen M , Wu D , Wu M , Xia A , Zandieh A , Zhu X
Ref : Science , 291 :1304 , 2001
Abstract : A 2.91-billion base pair (bp) consensus sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome was generated by the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method. The 14.8-billion bp DNA sequence was generated over 9 months from 27,271,853 high-quality sequence reads (5.11-fold coverage of the genome) from both ends of plasmid clones made from the DNA of five individuals. Two assembly strategies-a whole-genome assembly and a regional chromosome assembly-were used, each combining sequence data from Celera and the publicly funded genome effort. The public data were shredded into 550-bp segments to create a 2.9-fold coverage of those genome regions that had been sequenced, without including biases inherent in the cloning and assembly procedure used by the publicly funded group. This brought the effective coverage in the assemblies to eightfold, reducing the number and size of gaps in the final assembly over what would be obtained with 5.11-fold coverage. The two assembly strategies yielded very similar results that largely agree with independent mapping data. The assemblies effectively cover the euchromatic regions of the human chromosomes. More than 90% of the genome is in scaffold assemblies of 100,000 bp or more, and 25% of the genome is in scaffolds of 10 million bp or larger. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed 26,588 protein-encoding transcripts for which there was strong corroborating evidence and an additional approximately 12,000 computationally derived genes with mouse matches or other weak supporting evidence. Although gene-dense clusters are obvious, almost half the genes are dispersed in low G+C sequence separated by large tracts of apparently noncoding sequence. Only 1.1% of the genome is spanned by exons, whereas 24% is in introns, with 75% of the genome being intergenic DNA. Duplications of segmental blocks, ranging in size up to chromosomal lengths, are abundant throughout the genome and reveal a complex evolutionary history. Comparative genomic analysis indicates vertebrate expansions of genes associated with neuronal function, with tissue-specific developmental regulation, and with the hemostasis and immune systems. DNA sequence comparisons between the consensus sequence and publicly funded genome data provided locations of 2.1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A random pair of human haploid genomes differed at a rate of 1 bp per 1250 on average, but there was marked heterogeneity in the level of polymorphism across the genome. Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge.
ESTHER : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedSearch : Venter_2001_Science_291_1304
PubMedID: 11181995
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD11 , human-ACHE , human-BCHE , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CMBL , human-ABHD17A , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LYPLAL1 , human-NDRG2 , human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X , human-NLGN4Y , human-PAFAH2 , human-PREPL , human-RBBP9 , human-SPG21

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3