Sodergren E

References (17)

Title : Whole genome sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum strain Bosnia A: the genome is related to yaws treponemes but contains few loci similar to syphilis treponemes - Staudova_2014_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_8_e3261
Author(s) : Staudova B , Strouhal M , Zobanikova M , Cejkova D , Fulton LL , Chen L , Giacani L , Centurion-Lara A , Bruisten SM , Sodergren E , Weinstock GM , Smajs D
Ref : PLoS Negl Trop Dis , 8 :e3261 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: T. pallidum subsp. endemicum (TEN) is the causative agent of bejel (also known as endemic syphilis). Clinical symptoms of syphilis and bejel are overlapping and the epidemiological context is important for correct diagnosis of both diseases. In contrast to syphilis, caused by T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA), TEN infections are usually spread by direct contact or contaminated utensils rather than by sexual contact. Bejel is most often seen in western Africa and in the Middle East. The strain Bosnia A was isolated in 1950 in Bosnia, southern Europe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The complete genome of the Bosnia A strain was amplified and sequenced using the pooled segment genome sequencing (PSGS) method and a combination of three next-generation sequencing techniques (SOLiD, Roche 454, and Illumina). Using this approach, a total combined average genome coverage of 513x was achieved. The size of the Bosnia A genome was found to be 1,137,653 bp, i.e. 1.6-2.8 kbp shorter than any previously published genomes of uncultivable pathogenic treponemes. Conserved gene synteny was found in the Bosnia A genome compared to other sequenced syphilis and yaws treponemes. The TEN Bosnia A genome was distinct but very similar to the genome of yaws-causing T. pallidum subsp. pertenue (TPE) strains. Interestingly, the TEN Bosnia A genome was found to contain several sequences, which so far, have been uniquely identified only in syphilis treponemes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome of TEN Bosnia A contains several sequences thought to be unique to TPA strains; these sequences very likely represent remnants of recombination events during the evolution of TEN treponemes. This finding emphasizes a possible role of repeated horizontal gene transfer between treponemal subspecies in shaping the Bosnia A genome.
ESTHER : Staudova_2014_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_8_e3261
PubMedSearch : Staudova_2014_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_8_e3261
PubMedID: 25375929
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-TP0902

Title : Propionibacterium acnes strain populations in the human skin microbiome associated with acne - Fitz-Gibbon_2013_J.Invest.Dermatol_133_2152
Author(s) : Fitz-Gibbon S , Tomida S , Chiu BH , Nguyen L , Du C , Liu M , Elashoff D , Erfe MC , Loncaric A , Kim J , Modlin RL , Miller JF , Sodergren E , Craft N , Weinstock GM , Li H
Ref : Journal of Investigative Dermatology , 133 :2152 , 2013
Abstract : The human skin microbiome has important roles in skin health and disease. However, bacterial population structure and diversity at the strain level is poorly understood. We compared the skin microbiome at the strain level and genome level of Propionibacterium acnes, a dominant skin commensal, between 49 acne patients and 52 healthy individuals by sampling the pilosebaceous units on their noses. Metagenomic analysis demonstrated that although the relative abundances of P. acnes were similar, the strain population structures were significantly different in the two cohorts. Certain strains were highly associated with acne, and other strains were enriched in healthy skin. By sequencing 66 previously unreported P. acnes strains and comparing 71 P. acnes genomes, we identified potential genetic determinants of various P. acnes strains in association with acne or health. Our analysis suggests that acquired DNA sequences and bacterial immune elements may have roles in determining virulence properties of P. acnes strains, and some could be future targets for therapeutic interventions. This study demonstrates a previously unreported paradigm of commensal strain populations that could explain the pathogenesis of human diseases. It underscores the importance of strain-level analysis of the human microbiome to define the role of commensals in health and disease.
ESTHER : Fitz-Gibbon_2013_J.Invest.Dermatol_133_2152
PubMedSearch : Fitz-Gibbon_2013_J.Invest.Dermatol_133_2152
PubMedID: 23337890
Gene_locus related to this paper: proac-q6a5t3 , proac-q6a981

Title : Whole genome sequences of three Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue strains: yaws and syphilis treponemes differ in less than 0.2\% of the genome sequence - Cejkova_2012_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_6_e1471
Author(s) : Cejkova D , Zobanikova M , Chen L , Pospisilova P , Strouhal M , Qin X , Mikalova L , Norris SJ , Muzny DM , Gibbs RA , Fulton LL , Sodergren E , Weinstock GM , Smajs D
Ref : PLoS Negl Trop Dis , 6 :e1471 , 2012
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The yaws treponemes, Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE) strains, are closely related to syphilis causing strains of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA). Both yaws and syphilis are distinguished on the basis of epidemiological characteristics, clinical symptoms, and several genetic signatures of the corresponding causative agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To precisely define genetic differences between TPA and TPE, high-quality whole genome sequences of three TPE strains (Samoa D, CDC-2, Gauthier) were determined using next-generation sequencing techniques. TPE genome sequences were compared to four genomes of TPA strains (Nichols, DAL-1, SS14, Chicago). The genome structure was identical in all three TPE strains with similar length ranging between 1,139,330 bp and 1,139,744 bp. No major genome rearrangements were found when compared to the four TPA genomes. The whole genome nucleotide divergence (d(A)) between TPA and TPE subspecies was 4.7 and 4.8 times higher than the observed nucleotide diversity (pi) among TPA and TPE strains, respectively, corresponding to 99.8% identity between TPA and TPE genomes. A set of 97 (9.9%) TPE genes encoded proteins containing two or more amino acid replacements or other major sequence changes. The TPE divergent genes were mostly from the group encoding potential virulence factors and genes encoding proteins with unknown function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothetical genes, with genetic differences, consistently found between TPE and TPA strains are candidates for syphilitic treponemes virulence factors. Seventeen TPE genes were predicted under positive selection, and eleven of them coded either for predicted exported proteins or membrane proteins suggesting their possible association with the cell surface. Sequence changes between TPE and TPA strains and changes specific to individual strains represent suitable targets for subspecies- and strain-specific molecular diagnostics.
ESTHER : Cejkova_2012_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_6_e1471
PubMedSearch : Cejkova_2012_PLoS.Negl.Trop.Dis_6_e1471
PubMedID: 22292095
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-TP0902

Title : A high-resolution map of human evolutionary constraint using 29 mammals - Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
Author(s) : Lindblad-Toh K , Garber M , Zuk O , Lin MF , Parker BJ , Washietl S , Kheradpour P , Ernst J , Jordan G , Mauceli E , Ward LD , Lowe CB , Holloway AK , Clamp M , Gnerre S , Alfoldi J , Beal K , Chang J , Clawson H , Cuff J , Di Palma F , Fitzgerald S , Flicek P , Guttman M , Hubisz MJ , Jaffe DB , Jungreis I , Kent WJ , Kostka D , Lara M , Martins AL , Massingham T , Moltke I , Raney BJ , Rasmussen MD , Robinson J , Stark A , Vilella AJ , Wen J , Xie X , Zody MC , Baldwin J , Bloom T , Chin CW , Heiman D , Nicol R , Nusbaum C , Young S , Wilkinson J , Worley KC , Kovar CL , Muzny DM , Gibbs RA , Cree A , Dihn HH , Fowler G , Jhangiani S , Joshi V , Lee S , Lewis LR , Nazareth LV , Okwuonu G , Santibanez J , Warren WC , Mardis ER , Weinstock GM , Wilson RK , Delehaunty K , Dooling D , Fronik C , Fulton L , Fulton B , Graves T , Minx P , Sodergren E , Birney E , Margulies EH , Herrero J , Green ED , Haussler D , Siepel A , Goldman N , Pollard KS , Pedersen JS , Lander ES , Kellis M
Ref : Nature , 478 :476 , 2011
Abstract : The comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome has undergone purifying selection, and locate constrained elements covering approximately 4.2% of the genome. We use evolutionary signatures and comparisons with experimental data sets to suggest candidate functions for approximately 60% of constrained bases. These elements reveal a small number of new coding exons, candidate stop codon readthrough events and over 10,000 regions of overlapping synonymous constraint within protein-coding exons. We find 220 candidate RNA structural families, and nearly a million elements overlapping potential promoter, enhancer and insulator regions. We report specific amino acid residues that have undergone positive selection, 280,000 non-coding elements exapted from mobile elements and more than 1,000 primate- and human-accelerated elements. Overlap with disease-associated variants indicates that our findings will be relevant for studies of human biology, health and disease.
ESTHER : Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
PubMedSearch : Lindblad-Toh_2011_Nature_478_476
PubMedID: 21993624
Gene_locus related to this paper: cavpo-1plip , cavpo-2plrp , cavpo-h0v1b7 , cavpo-h0v5v8 , cavpo-h0vj36 , cavpo-lipli , rabit-1hlip , rabit-1plip , rabit-g1t6x7 , rabit-LIPH , myolu-l7n1c2 , myolu-g1pqd9 , cavpo-h0uyz6 , cavpo-h0vi56 , rabit-g1tbj4 , myolu-g1p5c0 , rabit-g1sds3 , rabit-g1sye0 , cavpo-h0v0r2 , cavpo-h0v7s5 , rabit-g1sp43 , myolu-g1p4p3 , cavpo-h0vw09 , rabit-g1ssu3 , myolu-g1pds0 , rabit-g1sic4 , cavpo-h0v2c4 , myolu-g1pg61 , myolu-g1pnb1 , myolu-g1pu06 , myolu-g1qa15 , myolu-g1qfu0 , rabit-g1sn99 , rabit-g1snq9 , rabit-g1sns7 , rabit-g1tuu8 , rabit-g1tzq7 , cavpo-h0v2i2 , cavpo-h0v2j0 , cavpo-h0vsf5 , cavpo-a0a286x8d3 , cavpo-a0a286xbr3 , cavpo-a0a286y0i8 , cavpo-a0a286y4p3 , myolu-g1q2n9 , cavpo-h0v1p4 , myolu-g1pan8 , myolu-g1paq0 , myolu-g1par4 , myolu-g1prn3 , myolu-g1q3i0 , myolu-g1q463 , myolu-g1pat6 , myolu-g1q859 , rabit-g1sul9 , rabit-g1sun0 , rabit-g1sup0 , myolu-l7n125 , myolu-g1pan2 , rabit-g1sxd0 , cavpo-h0v8j4 , rabit-d5fit0 , rabit-g1tkr5 , myolu-g1nty6 , myolu-g1p1p3 , cavpo-h0vdd5 , myolu-g1pdp2 , rabit-g1tmm5 , cavpo-h0vhq3 , myolu-g1nth4 , cavpo-h0vqx6 , rabit-g1tqr7 , myolu-g1p1e9 , cavpo-h0v8y6 , rabit-g1skt3 , myolu-g1nzg3 , cavpo-h0v5z0 , rabit-g1sgz5 , myolu-g1pkg5 , rabit-g1tmw5 , rabit-g1t134 , cavpo-a0a286x9v5 , myolu-g1qc57 , myolu-g1q061 , rabit-g1tnp4 , rabit-g1tyf7 , cavpo-h0w2w1 , rabit-g1ta36 , cavpo-h0w342 , myolu-g1q4e3 , rabit-g1sqa1 , cavpo-h0uxk7 , myolu-g1p353 , cavpo-h0vpm0 , rabit-a0a5f9cru6 , cavpo-a0a286xtc0

Title : A catalog of reference genomes from the human microbiome - Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK , Worley KC , Creasy HH , Wortman JR , Rusch DB , Mitreva M , Sodergren E , Chinwalla AT , Feldgarden M , Gevers D , Haas BJ , Madupu R , Ward DV , Birren BW , Gibbs RA , Methe B , Petrosino JF , Strausberg RL , Sutton GG , White OR , Wilson RK , Durkin S , Giglio MG , Gujja S , Howarth C , Kodira CD , Kyrpides N , Mehta T , Muzny DM , Pearson M , Pepin K , Pati A , Qin X , Yandava C , Zeng Q , Zhang L , Berlin AM , Chen L , Hepburn TA , Johnson J , McCorrison J , Miller J , Minx P , Nusbaum C , Russ C , Sykes SM , Tomlinson CM , Young S , Warren WC , Badger J , Crabtree J , Markowitz VM , Orvis J , Cree A , Ferriera S , Fulton LL , Fulton RS , Gillis M , Hemphill LD , Joshi V , Kovar C , Torralba M , Wetterstrand KA , Abouellleil A , Wollam AM , Buhay CJ , Ding Y , Dugan S , Fitzgerald MG , Holder M , Hostetler J , Clifton SW , Allen-Vercoe E , Earl AM , Farmer CN , Liolios K , Surette MG , Xu Q , Pohl C , Wilczek-Boney K , Zhu D
Ref : Science , 328 :994 , 2010
Abstract : The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms, including prokaryotes, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes, that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses on describing the diversity of microbial species that are associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains, previously unidentified ("novel") polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length greater than 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any nonreference entry in the nonredundant subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (approximately 97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for approximately 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic data sets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by our group for quality assurance are presented.
ESTHER : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2010_Science_328_994
PubMedID: 20489017
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-pepx

Title : The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution - Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Tellam RL , Worley KC , Gibbs RA , Muzny DM , Weinstock GM , Adelson DL , Eichler EE , Elnitski L , Guigo R , Hamernik DL , Kappes SM , Lewin HA , Lynn DJ , Nicholas FW , Reymond A , Rijnkels M , Skow LC , Zdobnov EM , Schook L , Womack J , Alioto T , Antonarakis SE , Astashyn A , Chapple CE , Chen HC , Chrast J , Camara F , Ermolaeva O , Henrichsen CN , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Kokocinski F , Landrum M , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Searle SM , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Ucla C , Wyss C , Anzola JM , Gerlach D , Elhaik E , Graur D , Reese JT , Edgar RC , McEwan JC , Payne GM , Raison JM , Junier T , Kriventseva EV , Eyras E , Plass M , Donthu R , Larkin DM , Reecy J , Yang MQ , Chen L , Cheng Z , Chitko-McKown CG , Liu GE , Matukumalli LK , Song J , Zhu B , Bradley DG , Brinkman FS , Lau LP , Whiteside MD , Walker A , Wheeler TT , Casey T , German JB , Lemay DG , Maqbool NJ , Molenaar AJ , Seo S , Stothard P , Baldwin CL , Baxter R , Brinkmeyer-Langford CL , Brown WC , Childers CP , Connelley T , Ellis SA , Fritz K , Glass EJ , Herzig CT , Iivanainen A , Lahmers KK , Bennett AK , Dickens CM , Gilbert JG , Hagen DE , Salih H , Aerts J , Caetano AR , Dalrymple B , Garcia JF , Gill CA , Hiendleder SG , Memili E , Spurlock D , Williams JL , Alexander L , Brownstein MJ , Guan L , Holt RA , Jones SJ , Marra MA , Moore R , Moore SS , Roberts A , Taniguchi M , Waterman RC , Chacko J , Chandrabose MM , Cree A , Dao MD , Dinh HH , Gabisi RA , Hines S , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Kovar CL , Lewis LR , Liu YS , Lopez J , Morgan MB , Nguyen NB , Okwuonu GO , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Wright RA , Buhay C , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Herdandez J , Holder M , Sabo A , Egan A , Goodell J , Wilczek-Boney K , Fowler GR , Hitchens ME , Lozado RJ , Moen C , Steffen D , Warren JT , Zhang J , Chiu R , Schein JE , Durbin KJ , Havlak P , Jiang H , Liu Y , Qin X , Ren Y , Shen Y , Song H , Bell SN , Davis C , Johnson AJ , Lee S , Nazareth LV , Patel BM , Pu LL , Vattathil S , Williams RL, Jr. , Curry S , Hamilton C , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Barris W , Bennett GL , Eggen A , Green RD , Harhay GP , Hobbs M , Jann O , Keele JW , Kent MP , Lien S , McKay SD , McWilliam S , Ratnakumar A , Schnabel RD , Smith T , Snelling WM , Sonstegard TS , Stone RT , Sugimoto Y , Takasuga A , Taylor JF , Van Tassell CP , Macneil MD , Abatepaulo AR , Abbey CA , Ahola V , Almeida IG , Amadio AF , Anatriello E , Bahadue SM , Biase FH , Boldt CR , Carroll JA , Carvalho WA , Cervelatti EP , Chacko E , Chapin JE , Cheng Y , Choi J , Colley AJ , de Campos TA , De Donato M , Santos IK , de Oliveira CJ , Deobald H , Devinoy E , Donohue KE , Dovc P , Eberlein A , Fitzsimmons CJ , Franzin AM , Garcia GR , Genini S , Gladney CJ , Grant JR , Greaser ML , Green JA , Hadsell DL , Hakimov HA , Halgren R , Harrow JL , Hart EA , Hastings N , Hernandez M , Hu ZL , Ingham A , Iso-Touru T , Jamis C , Jensen K , Kapetis D , Kerr T , Khalil SS , Khatib H , Kolbehdari D , Kumar CG , Kumar D , Leach R , Lee JC , Li C , Logan KM , Malinverni R , Marques E , Martin WF , Martins NF , Maruyama SR , Mazza R , McLean KL , Medrano JF , Moreno BT , More DD , Muntean CT , Nandakumar HP , Nogueira MF , Olsaker I , Pant SD , Panzitta F , Pastor RC , Poli MA , Poslusny N , Rachagani S , Ranganathan S , Razpet A , Riggs PK , Rincon G , Rodriguez-Osorio N , Rodriguez-Zas SL , Romero NE , Rosenwald A , Sando L , Schmutz SM , Shen L , Sherman L , Southey BR , Lutzow YS , Sweedler JV , Tammen I , Telugu BP , Urbanski JM , Utsunomiya YT , Verschoor CP , Waardenberg AJ , Wang Z , Ward R , Weikard R , Welsh TH, Jr. , White SN , Wilming LG , Wunderlich KR , Yang J , Zhao FQ
Ref : Science , 324 :522 , 2009
Abstract : To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
ESTHER : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedID: 19390049
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-2neur , bovin-a0jnh8 , bovin-a5d7b7 , bovin-ACHE , bovin-balip , bovin-dpp4 , bovin-dpp6 , bovin-e1bi31 , bovin-e1bn79 , bovin-est8 , bovin-f1mbd6 , bovin-f1mi11 , bovin-f1mr65 , bovin-f1n1l4 , bovin-g3mxp5 , bovin-q0vcc8 , bovin-q2kj30 , bovin-q3t0r6 , bovin-thyro

Title : Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum strain SS14 determined with oligonucleotide arrays - Matejkova_2008_BMC.Microbiol_8_76
Author(s) : Matejkova P , Strouhal M , Smajs D , Norris SJ , Palzkill T , Petrosino JF , Sodergren E , Norton JE , Singh J , Richmond TA , Molla MN , Albert TJ , Weinstock GM
Ref : BMC Microbiol , 8 :76 , 2008
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum remains the enigmatic pathogen, since no virulence factors have been identified and the pathogenesis of the disease is poorly understood. Increasing rates of new syphilis cases per year have been observed recently.
RESULTS: The genome of the SS14 strain was sequenced to high accuracy by an oligonucleotide array strategy requiring hybridization to only three arrays (Comparative Genome Sequencing, CGS). Gaps in the resulting sequence were filled with targeted dideoxy-terminators (DDT) sequencing and the sequence was confirmed by whole genome fingerprinting (WGF). When compared to the Nichols strain, 327 single nucleotide substitutions (224 transitions, 103 transversions), 14 deletions, and 18 insertions were found. On the proteome level, the highest frequency of amino acid-altering substitution polymorphisms was in novel genes, while the lowest was in housekeeping genes, as expected by their evolutionary conservation. Evidence was also found for hypervariable regions and multiple regions showing intrastrain heterogeneity in the T. pallidum chromosome. CONCLUSION: The observed genetic changes do not have influence on the ability of Treponema pallidum to cause syphilitic infection, since both SS14 and Nichols are virulent in rabbit. However, this is the first assessment of the degree of variation between the two syphilis pathogens and paves the way for phylogenetic studies of this fascinating organism.
ESTHER : Matejkova_2008_BMC.Microbiol_8_76
PubMedSearch : Matejkova_2008_BMC.Microbiol_8_76
PubMedID: 18482458
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-naptd , trepa-TP0902

Title : The genome of the model beetle and pest Tribolium castaneum - Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
Author(s) : Richards S , Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Brown SJ , Denell R , Beeman RW , Gibbs R , Bucher G , Friedrich M , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Klingler M , Lorenzen M , Roth S , Schroder R , Tautz D , Zdobnov EM , Muzny D , Attaway T , Bell S , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Chavez D , Clerk-Blankenburg KP , Cree A , Dao M , Davis C , Chacko J , Dinh H , Dugan-Rocha S , Fowler G , Garner TT , Garnes J , Gnirke A , Hawes A , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Jackson L , Kovar C , Kowis A , Lee S , Lewis LR , Margolis J , Morgan M , Nazareth LV , Nguyen N , Okwuonu G , Parker D , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Savard J , Scherer SE , Schneider B , Sodergren E , Vattahil S , Villasana D , White CS , Wright R , Park Y , Lord J , Oppert B , Brown S , Wang L , Weinstock G , Liu Y , Worley K , Elsik CG , Reese JT , Elhaik E , Landan G , Graur D , Arensburger P , Atkinson P , Beidler J , Demuth JP , Drury DW , Du YZ , Fujiwara H , Maselli V , Osanai M , Robertson HM , Tu Z , Wang JJ , Wang S , Song H , Zhang L , Werner D , Stanke M , Morgenstern B , Solovyev V , Kosarev P , Brown G , Chen HC , Ermolaeva O , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Souvorov A , Mackey AJ , Waterhouse RM , Wyder S , Kriventseva EV , Kadowaki T , Bork P , Aranda M , Bao R , Beermann A , Berns N , Bolognesi R , Bonneton F , Bopp D , Butts T , Chaumot A , Denell RE , Ferrier DE , Gordon CM , Jindra M , Lan Q , Lattorff HM , Laudet V , von Levetsow C , Liu Z , Lutz R , Lynch JA , da Fonseca RN , Posnien N , Reuter R , Schinko JB , Schmitt C , Schoppmeier M , Shippy TD , Simonnet F , Marques-Souza H , Tomoyasu Y , Trauner J , Van der Zee M , Vervoort M , Wittkopp N , Wimmer EA , Yang X , Jones AK , Sattelle DB , Ebert PR , Nelson D , Scott JG , Muthukrishnan S , Kramer KJ , Arakane Y , Zhu Q , Hogenkamp D , Dixit R , Jiang H , Zou Z , Marshall J , Elpidina E , Vinokurov K , Oppert C , Evans J , Lu Z , Zhao P , Sumathipala N , Altincicek B , Vilcinskas A , Williams M , Hultmark D , Hetru C , Hauser F , Cazzamali G , Williamson M , Li B , Tanaka Y , Predel R , Neupert S , Schachtner J , Verleyen P , Raible F , Walden KK , Angeli S , Foret S , Schuetz S , Maleszka R , Miller SC , Grossmann D
Ref : Nature , 452 :949 , 2008
Abstract : Tribolium castaneum is a member of the most species-rich eukaryotic order, a powerful model organism for the study of generalized insect development, and an important pest of stored agricultural products. We describe its genome sequence here. This omnivorous beetle has evolved the ability to interact with a diverse chemical environment, as shown by large expansions in odorant and gustatory receptors, as well as P450 and other detoxification enzymes. Development in Tribolium is more representative of other insects than is Drosophila, a fact reflected in gene content and function. For example, Tribolium has retained more ancestral genes involved in cell-cell communication than Drosophila, some being expressed in the growth zone crucial for axial elongation in short-germ development. Systemic RNA interference in T. castaneum functions differently from that in Caenorhabditis elegans, but nevertheless offers similar power for the elucidation of gene function and identification of targets for selective insect control.
ESTHER : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedSearch : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedID: 18362917
Gene_locus related to this paper: trica-ACHE1 , trica-ACHE2 , trica-d2a0g9 , trica-d2a0h0 , trica-d2a0w9 , trica-d2a0x0 , trica-d2a0x1 , trica-d2a0x3 , trica-d2a0x4.1 , trica-d2a0x4.2 , trica-d2a0x6 , trica-d2a2b8 , trica-d2a2h1 , trica-d2a3c3 , trica-d2a3g9 , trica-d2a5y5 , trica-d2a309 , trica-d2a514 , trica-d2a515 , trica-d2a516 , trica-d2a577 , trica-d2a578 , trica-d6w6x8 , trica-d6w7f9 , trica-d6w7h2 , trica-d6w8e7 , trica-d6w9c0 , trica-d6w855 , trica-d6wac8 , trica-d6wan4 , trica-d6wd50 , trica-d6wd73 , trica-d6wd74 , trica-A0A139WM97 , trica-d6wfu3 , trica-d6wgl2 , trica-d6wj57 , trica-d6wj59 , trica-d6wjs3 , trica-d6wl31 , trica-d6wnv1 , trica-d6wpl0 , trica-d6wqd6 , trica-d6wqr4 , trica-d6ws52 , trica-d6wsm0 , trica-d6wu38 , trica-d6wu39 , trica-d6wu40 , trica-d6wu41 , trica-d6wu44 , trica-d6wvk5 , trica-d6wvz7 , trica-d6wwu9 , trica-d6wwv0 , trica-d6wxz0 , trica-d6wyy1 , trica-d6wyy2 , trica-d6x0z2 , trica-d6x0z5 , trica-d6x0z6 , trica-d6x4b2 , trica-d6x4e8 , trica-d6x4e9 , trica-d6x197 , trica-d7eip7 , trica-d7eld3 , trica-d7us45 , trica-q5wm43 , trica-q5zex9 , trica-d6wie5 , trica-d6w7t0 , trica-d6x4h0 , trica-d6x4h1 , trica-a0a139wae8 , trica-a0a139wc96 , trica-d6x325 , trica-d2a4s2 , trica-d6wvw8

Title : Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome - Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Rogers J , Katze MG , Bumgarner R , Weinstock GM , Mardis ER , Remington KA , Strausberg RL , Venter JC , Wilson RK , Batzer MA , Bustamante CD , Eichler EE , Hahn MW , Hardison RC , Makova KD , Miller W , Milosavljevic A , Palermo RE , Siepel A , Sikela JM , Attaway T , Bell S , Bernard KE , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Dao M , Davis C , Delehaunty KD , Ding Y , Dinh HH , Dugan-Rocha S , Fulton LA , Gabisi RA , Garner TT , Godfrey J , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Kirkness EF , Cree A , Fowler RG , Lee S , Lewis LR , Li Z , Liu YS , Moore SM , Muzny D , Nazareth LV , Ngo DN , Okwuonu GO , Pai G , Parker D , Paul HA , Pfannkoch C , Pohl CS , Rogers YH , Ruiz SJ , Sabo A , Santibanez J , Schneider BW , Smith SM , Sodergren E , Svatek AF , Utterback TR , Vattathil S , Warren W , White CS , Chinwalla AT , Feng Y , Halpern AL , Hillier LW , Huang X , Minx P , Nelson JO , Pepin KH , Qin X , Sutton GG , Venter E , Walenz BP , Wallis JW , Worley KC , Yang SP , Jones SM , Marra MA , Rocchi M , Schein JE , Baertsch R , Clarke L , Csuros M , Glasscock J , Harris RA , Havlak P , Jackson AR , Jiang H , Liu Y , Messina DN , Shen Y , Song HX , Wylie T , Zhang L , Birney E , Han K , Konkel MK , Lee J , Smit AF , Ullmer B , Wang H , Xing J , Burhans R , Cheng Z , Karro JE , Ma J , Raney B , She X , Cox MJ , Demuth JP , Dumas LJ , Han SG , Hopkins J , Karimpour-Fard A , Kim YH , Pollack JR , Vinar T , Addo-Quaye C , Degenhardt J , Denby A , Hubisz MJ , Indap A , Kosiol C , Lahn BT , Lawson HA , Marklein A , Nielsen R , Vallender EJ , Clark AG , Ferguson B , Hernandez RD , Hirani K , Kehrer-Sawatzki H , Kolb J , Patil S , Pu LL , Ren Y , Smith DG , Wheeler DA , Schenck I , Ball EV , Chen R , Cooper DN , Giardine B , Hsu F , Kent WJ , Lesk A , Nelson DL , O'Brien W E , Prufer K , Stenson PD , Wallace JC , Ke H , Liu XM , Wang P , Xiang AP , Yang F , Barber GP , Haussler D , Karolchik D , Kern AD , Kuhn RM , Smith KE , Zwieg AS
Ref : Science , 316 :222 , 2007
Abstract : The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedID: 17431167
Gene_locus related to this paper: macmu-3neur , macmu-ACHE , macmu-BCHE , macmu-f6rul6 , macmu-f6sz31 , macmu-f6the6 , macmu-f6unj2 , macmu-f6wtx1 , macmu-f6zkq5 , macmu-f7aa58 , macmu-f7ai42 , macmu-f7aim4 , macmu-f7buk8 , macmu-f7cfi8 , macmu-f7cnr2 , macmu-f7cu68 , macmu-f7flv1 , macmu-f7ggk1 , macmu-f7hir7 , macmu-g7n054 , macmu-KANSL3 , macmu-TEX30 , macmu-Y4neur , macmu-g7n4x3 , macmu-i2cy02 , macmu-f7ba84 , macmu-CES2 , macmu-h9er02 , macmu-a0a1d5rbr3 , macmu-a0a1d5q4k5 , macmu-g7mxj6 , macmu-f7dn71 , macmu-f7hkw9 , macmu-f7hm08 , macmu-g7mke4 , macmu-a0a1d5rh04 , macmu-h9fud6 , macmu-f6qwx1 , macmu-f7h4t2 , macmu-h9zaw9 , macmu-f7h550 , macmu-a0a1d5q9w1 , macmu-f7gkb9 , macmu-f7hp78 , macmu-a0a1d5qvu5

Title : The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3 - Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
Author(s) : Muzny DM , Scherer SE , Kaul R , Wang J , Yu J , Sudbrak R , Buhay CJ , Chen R , Cree A , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Gill R , Gunaratne P , Harris RA , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hodgson AV , Hume J , Jackson A , Khan ZM , Kovar-Smith C , Lewis LR , Lozado RJ , Metzker ML , Milosavljevic A , Miner GR , Morgan MB , Nazareth LV , Scott G , Sodergren E , Song XZ , Steffen D , Wei S , Wheeler DA , Wright MW , Worley KC , Yuan Y , Zhang Z , Adams CQ , Ansari-Lari MA , Ayele M , Brown MJ , Chen G , Chen Z , Clendenning J , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Davis C , Delgado O , Dinh HH , Dong W , Draper H , Ernst S , Fu G , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Garcia DK , Gillett W , Gu J , Hao B , Haugen E , Havlak P , He X , Hennig S , Hu S , Huang W , Jackson LR , Jacob LS , Kelly SH , Kube M , Levy R , Li Z , Liu B , Liu J , Liu W , Lu J , Maheshwari M , Nguyen BV , Okwuonu GO , Palmeiri A , Pasternak S , Perez LM , Phelps KA , Plopper FJ , Qiang B , Raymond C , Rodriguez R , Saenphimmachak C , Santibanez J , Shen H , Shen Y , Subramanian S , Tabor PE , Verduzco D , Waldron L , Wang Q , Williams GA , Wong GK , Yao Z , Zhang J , Zhang X , Zhao G , Zhou J , Zhou Y , Nelson D , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Naylor SL , Yang H , Olson M , Weinstock G , Gibbs RA
Ref : Nature , 440 :1194 , 2006
Abstract : After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chromosomes. Chromosome 3 comprises just four contigs, one of which currently represents the longest unbroken stretch of finished DNA sequence known so far. The chromosome is remarkable in having the lowest rate of segmental duplication in the genome. It also includes a chemokine receptor gene cluster as well as numerous loci involved in multiple human cancers such as the gene encoding FHIT, which contains the most common constitutive fragile site in the genome, FRA3B. Using genomic sequence from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque, we were able to characterize the breakpoints defining a large pericentric inversion that occurred some time after the split of Homininae from Ponginae, and propose an evolutionary history of the inversion.
ESTHER : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedSearch : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedID: 16641997
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-AADACL2 , human-ABHD5 , human-ABHD6 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD14A , human-APEH , human-BCHE , human-CIB , human-LIPH , human-MGLL , human-NLGN1 , human-PLA1A

Title : The genome sequence of Mannheimia haemolytica A1: insights into virulence, natural competence, and Pasteurellaceae phylogeny - Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
Author(s) : Gioia J , Qin X , Jiang H , Clinkenbeard K , Lo R , Liu Y , Fox GE , Yerrapragada S , McLeod MP , McNeill TZ , Hemphill L , Sodergren E , Wang Q , Muzny DM , Homsi FJ , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :7257 , 2006
Abstract : The draft genome sequence of Mannheimia haemolytica A1, the causative agent of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), is presented. Strain ATCC BAA-410, isolated from the lung of a calf with BRDC, was the DNA source. The annotated genome includes 2,839 coding sequences, 1,966 of which were assigned a function and 436 of which are unique to M. haemolytica. Through genome annotation many features of interest were identified, including bacteriophages and genes related to virulence, natural competence, and transcriptional regulation. In addition to previously described virulence factors, M. haemolytica encodes adhesins, including the filamentous hemagglutinin FhaB and two trimeric autotransporter adhesins. Two dual-function immunoglobulin-protease/adhesins are also present, as is a third immunoglobulin protease. Genes related to iron acquisition and drug resistance were identified and are likely important for survival in the host and virulence. Analysis of the genome indicates that M. haemolytica is naturally competent, as genes for natural competence and DNA uptake signal sequences (USS) are present. Comparison of competence loci and USS in other species in the family Pasteurellaceae indicates that M. haemolytica, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Haemophilus ducreyi form a lineage distinct from other Pasteurellaceae. This observation was supported by a phylogenetic analysis using sequences of predicted housekeeping genes.
ESTHER : Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
PubMedSearch : Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
PubMedID: 17015664
Gene_locus related to this paper: pasha-a7jrr2 , pasha-a7js08 , pasha-a7jsd4 , pasha-a7jsj9 , pasha-a7ju47 , pasmu-q9cjt9

Title : The genome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum - Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
Author(s) : Eichinger L , Pachebat JA , Glockner G , Rajandream MA , Sucgang R , Berriman M , Song J , Olsen R , Szafranski K , Xu Q , Tunggal B , Kummerfeld S , Madera M , Konfortov BA , Rivero F , Bankier AT , Lehmann R , Hamlin N , Davies R , Gaudet P , Fey P , Pilcher K , Chen G , Saunders D , Sodergren E , Davis P , Kerhornou A , Nie X , Hall N , Anjard C , Hemphill L , Bason N , Farbrother P , Desany B , Just E , Morio T , Rost R , Churcher C , Cooper J , Haydock S , van Driessche N , Cronin A , Goodhead I , Muzny D , Mourier T , Pain A , Lu M , Harper D , Lindsay R , Hauser H , James K , Quiles M , Madan Babu M , Saito T , Buchrieser C , Wardroper A , Felder M , Thangavelu M , Johnson D , Knights A , Loulseged H , Mungall K , Oliver K , Price C , Quail MA , Urushihara H , Hernandez J , Rabbinowitsch E , Steffen D , Sanders M , Ma J , Kohara Y , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Spiegler S , Tivey A , Sugano S , White B , Walker D , Woodward J , Winckler T , Tanaka Y , Shaulsky G , Schleicher M , Weinstock G , Rosenthal A , Cox EC , Chisholm RL , Gibbs R , Loomis WF , Platzer M , Kay RR , Williams J , Dear PH , Noegel AA , Barrell B , Kuspa A
Ref : Nature , 435 :43 , 2005
Abstract : The social amoebae are exceptional in their ability to alternate between unicellular and multicellular forms. Here we describe the genome of the best-studied member of this group, Dictyostelium discoideum. The gene-dense chromosomes of this organism encode approximately 12,500 predicted proteins, a high proportion of which have long, repetitive amino acid tracts. There are many genes for polyketide synthases and ABC transporters, suggesting an extensive secondary metabolism for producing and exporting small molecules. The genome is rich in complex repeats, one class of which is clustered and may serve as centromeres. Partial copies of the extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) element are found at the ends of each chromosome, suggesting a novel telomere structure and the use of a common mechanism to maintain both the rDNA and chromosomal termini. A proteome-based phylogeny shows that the amoebozoa diverged from the animal-fungal lineage after the plant-animal split, but Dictyostelium seems to have retained more of the diversity of the ancestral genome than have plants, animals or fungi.
ESTHER : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedSearch : Eichinger_2005_Nature_435_43
PubMedID: 15875012
Gene_locus related to this paper: dicdi-abhd , dicdi-ACHE , dicdi-apra , dicdi-cinbp , dicdi-CMBL , dicdi-crysp , dicdi-DPOA , dicdi-P90528 , dicdi-ppme1 , dicdi-Q8MYE7 , dicdi-q54cf7 , dicdi-q54cl7 , dicdi-q54cm0 , dicdi-q54ct5 , dicdi-q54cu1 , dicdi-q54d54 , dicdi-q54d66 , dicdi-q54dj5 , dicdi-q54dy7 , dicdi-q54ek1 , dicdi-q54eq6 , dicdi-q54et1 , dicdi-q54et7 , dicdi-q54f01 , dicdi-q54g24 , dicdi-q54g47 , dicdi-q54gi7 , dicdi-q54gw5 , dicdi-q54gx3 , dicdi-q54h23 , dicdi-q54h73 , dicdi-q54i38 , dicdi-q54ie5 , dicdi-q54in4 , dicdi-q54kz1 , dicdi-q54l36 , dicdi-q54li1 , dicdi-q54m29 , dicdi-q54n21 , dicdi-q54n35 , dicdi-q54n85 , dicdi-q54qe7 , dicdi-q54qi3 , dicdi-q54qk2 , dicdi-q54rl3 , dicdi-q54rl8 , dicdi-q54sy6 , dicdi-q54sz3 , dicdi-q54t49 , dicdi-q54t91 , dicdi-q54th2 , dicdi-q54u01 , dicdi-q54vc2 , dicdi-q54vw1 , dicdi-q54xe3 , dicdi-q54xl3 , dicdi-q54xu1 , dicdi-q54xu2 , dicdi-q54y48 , dicdi-q54yd0 , dicdi-q54ye0 , dicdi-q54yl1 , dicdi-q54yr8 , dicdi-q54z90 , dicdi-q55bx3 , dicdi-q55d01 , dicdi-q55d81 , dicdi-q55du6 , dicdi-q55eu1 , dicdi-q55eu8 , dicdi-q55fk4 , dicdi-q55gk7 , dicdi-Q54ZA6 , dicdi-q86h82 , dicdi-Q86HC9 , dicdi-Q86HM5 , dicdi-Q86HM6 , dicdi-q86iz7 , dicdi-q86jb6 , dicdi-Q86KU7 , dicdi-q550s3 , dicdi-q552c0 , dicdi-q553t5 , dicdi-q555e5 , dicdi-q555h0 , dicdi-q555h1 , dicdi-q557k5 , dicdi-q558u2 , dicdi-Q869Q8 , dicdi-u554 , dicdi-y9086 , dicdi-q54r44 , dicdi-f172a

Title : The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome - Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
Author(s) : Ross MT , Grafham DV , Coffey AJ , Scherer S , McLay K , Muzny D , Platzer M , Howell GR , Burrows C , Bird CP , Frankish A , Lovell FL , Howe KL , Ashurst JL , Fulton RS , Sudbrak R , Wen G , Jones MC , Hurles ME , Andrews TD , Scott CE , Searle S , Ramser J , Whittaker A , Deadman R , Carter NP , Hunt SE , Chen R , Cree A , Gunaratne P , Havlak P , Hodgson A , Metzker ML , Richards S , Scott G , Steffen D , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Ainscough R , Ambrose KD , Ansari-Lari MA , Aradhya S , Ashwell RI , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Ballabio A , Banerjee R , Barker GE , Barlow KF , Barrett IP , Bates KN , Beare DM , Beasley H , Beasley O , Beck A , Bethel G , Blechschmidt K , Brady N , Bray-Allen S , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Brown MJ , Bonnin D , Bruford EA , Buhay C , Burch P , Burford D , Burgess J , Burrill W , Burton J , Bye JM , Carder C , Carrel L , Chako J , Chapman JC , Chavez D , Chen E , Chen G , Chen Y , Chen Z , Chinault C , Ciccodicola A , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Clerc-Blankenburg K , Clifford K , Cobley V , Cole CG , Conquer JS , Corby N , Connor RE , David R , Davies J , Davis C , Davis J , Delgado O , Deshazo D , Dhami P , Ding Y , Dinh H , Dodsworth S , Draper H , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunham A , Dunn M , Durbin KJ , Dutta I , Eades T , Ellwood M , Emery-Cohen A , Errington H , Evans KL , Faulkner L , Francis F , Frankland J , Fraser AE , Galgoczy P , Gilbert J , Gill R , Glockner G , Gregory SG , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gu Y , Gwilliam R , Hamilton C , Hart EA , Hawes A , Heath PD , Heitmann K , Hennig S , Hernandez J , Hinzmann B , Ho S , Hoffs M , Howden PJ , Huckle EJ , Hume J , Hunt PJ , Hunt AR , Isherwood J , Jacob L , Johnson D , Jones S , de Jong PJ , Joseph SS , Keenan S , Kelly S , Kershaw JK , Khan Z , Kioschis P , Klages S , Knights AJ , Kosiura A , Kovar-Smith C , Laird GK , Langford C , Lawlor S , Leversha M , Lewis L , Liu W , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loulseged H , Loveland JE , Lovell JD , Lozado R , Lu J , Lyne R , Ma J , Maheshwari M , Matthews LH , McDowall J , Mclaren S , McMurray A , Meidl P , Meitinger T , Milne S , Miner G , Mistry SL , Morgan M , Morris S , Muller I , Mullikin JC , Nguyen N , Nordsiek G , Nyakatura G , O'Dell CN , Okwuonu G , Palmer S , Pandian R , Parker D , Parrish J , Pasternak S , Patel D , Pearce AV , Pearson DM , Pelan SE , Perez L , Porter KM , Ramsey Y , Reichwald K , Rhodes S , Ridler KA , Schlessinger D , Schueler MG , Sehra HK , Shaw-Smith C , Shen H , Sheridan EM , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Sotheran EC , Steingruber HE , Steward CA , Storey R , Swann RM , Swarbreck D , Tabor PE , Taudien S , Taylor T , Teague B , Thomas K , Thorpe A , Timms K , Tracey A , Trevanion S , Tromans AC , d'Urso M , Verduzco D , Villasana D , Waldron L , Wall M , Wang Q , Warren J , Warry GL , Wei X , West A , Whitehead SL , Whiteley MN , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams G , Williams L , Williamson A , Williamson H , Wilming L , Woodmansey RL , Wray PW , Yen J , Zhang J , Zhou J , Zoghbi H , Zorilla S , Buck D , Reinhardt R , Poustka A , Rosenthal A , Lehrach H , Meindl A , Minx PJ , Hillier LW , Willard HF , Wilson RK , Waterston RH , Rice CM , Vaudin M , Coulson A , Nelson DL , Weinstock G , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Gibbs RA , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR
Ref : Nature , 434 :325 , 2005
Abstract : The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
ESTHER : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedSearch : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedID: 15772651
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X

Title : Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution - Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
Author(s) : Richards S , Liu Y , Bettencourt BR , Hradecky P , Letovsky S , Nielsen R , Thornton K , Hubisz MJ , Chen R , Meisel RP , Couronne O , Hua S , Smith MA , Zhang P , Liu J , Bussemaker HJ , van Batenburg MF , Howells SL , Scherer SE , Sodergren E , Matthews BB , Crosby MA , Schroeder AJ , Ortiz-Barrientos D , Rives CM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Scott G , Steffen D , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Havlak P , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan MB , Miner G , Hamilton C , Huang Y , Waldron L , Verduzco D , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Dubchak I , Noor MA , Anderson W , White KP , Clark AG , Schaeffer SW , Gelbart W , Weinstock GM , Gibbs RA
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1 , 2005
Abstract : We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled, leading to a minimum of 921 syntenic blocks shared between the species. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 25-55 million years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences between the species--but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.
ESTHER : Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
PubMedSearch : Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
PubMedID: 15632085
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-BEM46 , drome-GH02439 , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5di70 , drops-b5djn7 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dm12 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5du62 , drops-b5dud8 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dy09 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-b5e1k7 , drops-CG4390 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-est5c , drops-nrtac , drops-q2lyp3 , drops-q2lyp4 , drops-q2lyu3 , drops-q2lz68 , drops-q2m0u9 , drops-q2m169 , drops-q28wj5 , drops-q28wt2 , drops-q28wt8 , drops-q28zi3 , drops-q28zz1 , drops-q29a22 , drops-q29ad8 , drops-q29ad9 , drops-q29ae0 , drops-q29ae1 , drops-q29ay7 , drops-q29ay8 , drops-q29ay9 , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29br3 , drops-q29d59 , drops-q29dc9 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29dp4 , drops-q29dw3 , drops-q29dw4 , drops-q29e16 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q29f35 , drops-q29f66 , drops-q29fi0 , drops-q29fw0 , drops-q29fw9 , drops-q29g93 , drops-q29gb0 , drops-q29gs6 , drops-q29h54 , drops-b5dmp7 , drops-q29hd2 , drops-q29hu2 , drops-q29hu3 , drops-q29hv0 , drops-q29i09 , drops-q29js9 , drops-q29jt5 , drops-q29jt6 , drops-q29jy5 , drops-q29k25 , drops-q29kd5 , drops-q29kd6 , drops-q29ke5 , drops-q29kq9 , drops-q29kr1 , drops-q29kr3 , drops-q29kr5 , drops-q29kr8 , drops-q29kr9 , drops-q29ks6 , drops-q29kz0 , drops-q29kz1 , drops-q29l31 , drops-q29lf8 , drops-q29lv0 , drops-q29m07 , drops-q29m08 , drops-q29m27 , drops-q29m66 , drops-q29m81 , drops-q29mj7 , drops-q29mv2 , drops-q29mx0 , drops-q29n87 , drops-q29na5 , drops-q29na6 , drops-q29pe4 , drops-q29pk4 , drops-q290i1 , drops-q290k3 , drops-q290v8 , drops-q290v9 , drops-q290w0 , drops-q290z8 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q291y3 , drops-q292f5 , drops-q292g6 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q293y7 , drops-q294n3 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p0 , drops-q294p1 , drops-q294p3 , drops-q294p4 , drops-q294u9 , drops-q295h3 , drops-q296h2 , drops-q296x1 , drops-q296x2 , drops-q297h5 , drops-q298u8 , drope-b4gkk1

Title : Complete genome sequence of Rickettsia typhi and comparison with sequences of other rickettsiae - McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
Author(s) : McLeod MP , Qin X , Karpathy SE , Gioia J , Highlander SK , Fox GE , McNeill TZ , Jiang H , Muzny D , Jacob LS , Hawes AC , Sodergren E , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan M , Fan G , Amin AG , Gibbs RA , Hong C , Yu XJ , Walker DH , Weinstock GM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 186 :5842 , 2004
Abstract : Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of murine typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium with a life cycle involving both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Here we present the complete genome sequence of R. typhi (1,111,496 bp) and compare it to the two published rickettsial genome sequences: R. prowazekii and R. conorii. We identified 877 genes in R. typhi encoding 3 rRNAs, 33 tRNAs, 3 noncoding RNAs, and 838 proteins, 3 of which are frameshifts. In addition, we discovered more than 40 pseudogenes, including the entire cytochrome c oxidase system. The three rickettsial genomes share 775 genes: 23 are found only in R. prowazekii and R. typhi, 15 are found only in R. conorii and R. typhi, and 24 are unique to R. typhi. Although most of the genes are colinear, there is a 35-kb inversion in gene order, which is close to the replication terminus, in R. typhi, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. In addition, we found a 124-kb R. typhi-specific inversion, starting 19 kb from the origin of replication, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. Inversions in this region are also seen in the unpublished genome sequences of R. sibirica and R. rickettsii, indicating that this region is a hot spot for rearrangements. Genome comparisons also revealed a 12-kb insertion in the R. prowazekii genome, relative to R. typhi and R. conorii, which appears to have occurred after the typhus (R. prowazekii and R. typhi) and spotted fever (R. conorii) groups diverged. The three-way comparison allowed further in silico analysis of the SpoT split genes, leading us to propose that the stringent response system is still functional in these rickettsiae.
ESTHER : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedSearch : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedID: 15317790
Gene_locus related to this paper: ricco-PTRB , ricty-q68vs9 , ricty-q68w06 , ricty-q68w12 , ricty-q68w56 , ricty-q68wq9 , ricty-q68wt4 , ricty-q68x29 , ricty-q68xj3

Title : Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes - Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
Author(s) : Seshadri R , Myers GS , Tettelin H , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Dodson RJ , Davidsen TM , DeBoy RT , Fouts DE , Haft DH , Selengut J , Ren Q , Brinkac LM , Madupu R , Kolonay J , Durkin SA , Daugherty SC , Shetty J , Shvartsbeyn A , Gebregeorgis E , Geer K , Tsegaye G , Malek J , Ayodeji B , Shatsman S , McLeod MP , Smajs D , Howell JK , Pal S , Amin A , Vashisth P , McNeill TZ , Xiang Q , Sodergren E , Baca E , Weinstock GM , Norris SJ , Fraser CM , Paulsen IT
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :5646 , 2004
Abstract : We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function.
ESTHER : Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
PubMedSearch : Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
PubMedID: 15064399
Gene_locus related to this paper: trede-q73j01 , trede-q73kf5 , trede-q73kp3 , trede-q73ks1 , trede-q73nf8 , trede-q73qt5 , trede-q73qv0 , trede-q73ra4 , trede-q73ri8 , trede-Q93EK3 , trede-TDE0521

Title : Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete - Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Norris SJ , Weinstock GM , White O , Sutton GG , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Clayton R , Ketchum KA , Sodergren E , Hardham JM , McLeod MP , Salzberg S , Peterson J , Khalak H , Richardson D , Howell JK , Chidambaram M , Utterback T , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Cotton MD , Fujii C , Garland S , Hatch B , Horst K , Roberts K , Sandusky M , Weidman J , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 281 :375 , 1998
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum was determined and shown to be 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted coding sequences (open reading frames). Systems for DNA replication, transcription, translation, and repair are intact, but catabolic and biosynthetic activities are minimized. The number of identifiable transporters is small, and no phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase carbohydrate transporters were found. Potential virulence factors include a family of 12 potential membrane proteins and several putative hemolysins. Comparison of the T. pallidum genome sequence with that of another pathogenic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, identified unique and common genes and substantiates the considerable diversity observed among pathogenic spirochetes.
ESTHER : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedID: 9665876
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-naptd , trepa-TP0902 , trepa-TP0952