Liu YS

References (4)

Title : Selecting cells expressing high levels of recombinant proteins using the GPI-anchored protein with selenocysteine system - Liu_2021_J.Biosci.Bioeng_131_225
Author(s) : Liu YS , Matabaro E , Gao XD , Fujita M
Ref : J Biosci Bioeng , 131 :225 , 2021
Abstract : Most biopharmaceutical proteins are produced in mammalian cells because they have the advantageous capacity for protein folding, assembly, and posttranslational modifications. To satisfy the increasing demand for these proteins for clinical purposes and studies, traditional methods to improve protein productivity have included gene amplification, host cell engineering, medium optimization, and screening methods. However, screening and selection of high-producing cell lines remain complex and time consuming. In this study, we established a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein with a selenocysteine (GPS) system to select cells producing high levels of target secretory proteins. Recombinant lysosomal acid lipase (LIPA) and alpha-galactosidase A (GALA) were fused with a GPI attachment signal sequence and a selenocysteine insertion sequence after an in-frame UGA codon. Under these conditions, most of the recombinant proteins were secreted into the culture medium, but some were found to be GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface. When sodium selenite was supplied into the culture medium, the amount of GPI-anchored LIPA and GALA was increased. High-expressing cells were selected by detecting surface GPI-anchored LIPA. The GPI-anchored protein was then eliminated by knocking out the GPI biosynthesis gene PIGK, in these cells, all LIPA was in secreted form. Our system provides a promising method of isolating cells that highly express recombinant proteins from large cell populations.
ESTHER : Liu_2021_J.Biosci.Bioeng_131_225
PubMedSearch : Liu_2021_J.Biosci.Bioeng_131_225
PubMedID: 33158753

Title : Multi-biomarker responses as indication of contaminant effects in Gambusia affinis from impacted rivers by municipal effluents - Huang_2016_Sci.Total.Environ_563-564_273
Author(s) : Huang GY , Liu YS , Liang YQ , Shi WJ , Hu LX , Tian F , Chen J , Ying GG
Ref : Sci Total Environ , 563-564 :273 , 2016
Abstract : This study investigated toxic effects in mosquitofish from two urban rivers of South China impacted by municipal effluents by using multiple biomarkers including fish morphology, biochemical indicators and transcriptional responses, and explored potential cause-effect relationship with a list of chemicals (metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides). The results showed significant alterations in metallothionein (MT) protein and mRNA expression in mosquitofish collected from the two rivers and a strong association between MT protein and mRNA expression levels and heavy metals in the river water. Both ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity and cytochromes P450 1A (CYP1A) mRNA expression were significantly enhanced in mosquitofish at most sampling sites. There existed a strong correlation between EROD activity and CYP1A mRNA expression levels, but no clear correlations between these responses and PAHs in the river water possibly because of the presence of many other agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the two rivers. Significant acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was observed in mosquitofish brain samples. The pesticides in the two rivers showed an influence on the AChE activity, which was also found to be significantly negatively correlated to fipronil concentrations. Moreover, the result also indicates that metals and pesticides present in the two rivers might cause the observed estrogenic and androgenic effects in mosquitofish. The findings from this study clearly showed morphological, biochemical and transcriptional responses in mosquitofish due to chemical contamination of the two urban rivers. This multi-biomarker approach using mosquitofish can be applied to evaluate contamination of riverine environments.
ESTHER : Huang_2016_Sci.Total.Environ_563-564_273
PubMedSearch : Huang_2016_Sci.Total.Environ_563-564_273
PubMedID: 27135591

Title : The genome sequence of taurine cattle: a window to ruminant biology and evolution - Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Tellam RL , Worley KC , Gibbs RA , Muzny DM , Weinstock GM , Adelson DL , Eichler EE , Elnitski L , Guigo R , Hamernik DL , Kappes SM , Lewin HA , Lynn DJ , Nicholas FW , Reymond A , Rijnkels M , Skow LC , Zdobnov EM , Schook L , Womack J , Alioto T , Antonarakis SE , Astashyn A , Chapple CE , Chen HC , Chrast J , Camara F , Ermolaeva O , Henrichsen CN , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Kokocinski F , Landrum M , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Searle SM , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Ucla C , Wyss C , Anzola JM , Gerlach D , Elhaik E , Graur D , Reese JT , Edgar RC , McEwan JC , Payne GM , Raison JM , Junier T , Kriventseva EV , Eyras E , Plass M , Donthu R , Larkin DM , Reecy J , Yang MQ , Chen L , Cheng Z , Chitko-McKown CG , Liu GE , Matukumalli LK , Song J , Zhu B , Bradley DG , Brinkman FS , Lau LP , Whiteside MD , Walker A , Wheeler TT , Casey T , German JB , Lemay DG , Maqbool NJ , Molenaar AJ , Seo S , Stothard P , Baldwin CL , Baxter R , Brinkmeyer-Langford CL , Brown WC , Childers CP , Connelley T , Ellis SA , Fritz K , Glass EJ , Herzig CT , Iivanainen A , Lahmers KK , Bennett AK , Dickens CM , Gilbert JG , Hagen DE , Salih H , Aerts J , Caetano AR , Dalrymple B , Garcia JF , Gill CA , Hiendleder SG , Memili E , Spurlock D , Williams JL , Alexander L , Brownstein MJ , Guan L , Holt RA , Jones SJ , Marra MA , Moore R , Moore SS , Roberts A , Taniguchi M , Waterman RC , Chacko J , Chandrabose MM , Cree A , Dao MD , Dinh HH , Gabisi RA , Hines S , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Kovar CL , Lewis LR , Liu YS , Lopez J , Morgan MB , Nguyen NB , Okwuonu GO , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Wright RA , Buhay C , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Herdandez J , Holder M , Sabo A , Egan A , Goodell J , Wilczek-Boney K , Fowler GR , Hitchens ME , Lozado RJ , Moen C , Steffen D , Warren JT , Zhang J , Chiu R , Schein JE , Durbin KJ , Havlak P , Jiang H , Liu Y , Qin X , Ren Y , Shen Y , Song H , Bell SN , Davis C , Johnson AJ , Lee S , Nazareth LV , Patel BM , Pu LL , Vattathil S , Williams RL, Jr. , Curry S , Hamilton C , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Barris W , Bennett GL , Eggen A , Green RD , Harhay GP , Hobbs M , Jann O , Keele JW , Kent MP , Lien S , McKay SD , McWilliam S , Ratnakumar A , Schnabel RD , Smith T , Snelling WM , Sonstegard TS , Stone RT , Sugimoto Y , Takasuga A , Taylor JF , Van Tassell CP , Macneil MD , Abatepaulo AR , Abbey CA , Ahola V , Almeida IG , Amadio AF , Anatriello E , Bahadue SM , Biase FH , Boldt CR , Carroll JA , Carvalho WA , Cervelatti EP , Chacko E , Chapin JE , Cheng Y , Choi J , Colley AJ , de Campos TA , De Donato M , Santos IK , de Oliveira CJ , Deobald H , Devinoy E , Donohue KE , Dovc P , Eberlein A , Fitzsimmons CJ , Franzin AM , Garcia GR , Genini S , Gladney CJ , Grant JR , Greaser ML , Green JA , Hadsell DL , Hakimov HA , Halgren R , Harrow JL , Hart EA , Hastings N , Hernandez M , Hu ZL , Ingham A , Iso-Touru T , Jamis C , Jensen K , Kapetis D , Kerr T , Khalil SS , Khatib H , Kolbehdari D , Kumar CG , Kumar D , Leach R , Lee JC , Li C , Logan KM , Malinverni R , Marques E , Martin WF , Martins NF , Maruyama SR , Mazza R , McLean KL , Medrano JF , Moreno BT , More DD , Muntean CT , Nandakumar HP , Nogueira MF , Olsaker I , Pant SD , Panzitta F , Pastor RC , Poli MA , Poslusny N , Rachagani S , Ranganathan S , Razpet A , Riggs PK , Rincon G , Rodriguez-Osorio N , Rodriguez-Zas SL , Romero NE , Rosenwald A , Sando L , Schmutz SM , Shen L , Sherman L , Southey BR , Lutzow YS , Sweedler JV , Tammen I , Telugu BP , Urbanski JM , Utsunomiya YT , Verschoor CP , Waardenberg AJ , Wang Z , Ward R , Weikard R , Welsh TH, Jr. , White SN , Wilming LG , Wunderlich KR , Yang J , Zhao FQ
Ref : Science , 324 :522 , 2009
Abstract : To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
ESTHER : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2009_Science_324_522
PubMedID: 19390049
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-2neur , bovin-a0jnh8 , bovin-a5d7b7 , bovin-ACHE , bovin-balip , bovin-dpp4 , bovin-dpp6 , bovin-e1bi31 , bovin-e1bn79 , bovin-est8 , bovin-f1mbd6 , bovin-f1mi11 , bovin-f1mr65 , bovin-f1n1l4 , bovin-g3mxp5 , bovin-q0vcc8 , bovin-q2kj30 , bovin-q3t0r6 , bovin-thyro

Title : Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome - Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Rogers J , Katze MG , Bumgarner R , Weinstock GM , Mardis ER , Remington KA , Strausberg RL , Venter JC , Wilson RK , Batzer MA , Bustamante CD , Eichler EE , Hahn MW , Hardison RC , Makova KD , Miller W , Milosavljevic A , Palermo RE , Siepel A , Sikela JM , Attaway T , Bell S , Bernard KE , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Dao M , Davis C , Delehaunty KD , Ding Y , Dinh HH , Dugan-Rocha S , Fulton LA , Gabisi RA , Garner TT , Godfrey J , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Kirkness EF , Cree A , Fowler RG , Lee S , Lewis LR , Li Z , Liu YS , Moore SM , Muzny D , Nazareth LV , Ngo DN , Okwuonu GO , Pai G , Parker D , Paul HA , Pfannkoch C , Pohl CS , Rogers YH , Ruiz SJ , Sabo A , Santibanez J , Schneider BW , Smith SM , Sodergren E , Svatek AF , Utterback TR , Vattathil S , Warren W , White CS , Chinwalla AT , Feng Y , Halpern AL , Hillier LW , Huang X , Minx P , Nelson JO , Pepin KH , Qin X , Sutton GG , Venter E , Walenz BP , Wallis JW , Worley KC , Yang SP , Jones SM , Marra MA , Rocchi M , Schein JE , Baertsch R , Clarke L , Csuros M , Glasscock J , Harris RA , Havlak P , Jackson AR , Jiang H , Liu Y , Messina DN , Shen Y , Song HX , Wylie T , Zhang L , Birney E , Han K , Konkel MK , Lee J , Smit AF , Ullmer B , Wang H , Xing J , Burhans R , Cheng Z , Karro JE , Ma J , Raney B , She X , Cox MJ , Demuth JP , Dumas LJ , Han SG , Hopkins J , Karimpour-Fard A , Kim YH , Pollack JR , Vinar T , Addo-Quaye C , Degenhardt J , Denby A , Hubisz MJ , Indap A , Kosiol C , Lahn BT , Lawson HA , Marklein A , Nielsen R , Vallender EJ , Clark AG , Ferguson B , Hernandez RD , Hirani K , Kehrer-Sawatzki H , Kolb J , Patil S , Pu LL , Ren Y , Smith DG , Wheeler DA , Schenck I , Ball EV , Chen R , Cooper DN , Giardine B , Hsu F , Kent WJ , Lesk A , Nelson DL , O'Brien W E , Prufer K , Stenson PD , Wallace JC , Ke H , Liu XM , Wang P , Xiang AP , Yang F , Barber GP , Haussler D , Karolchik D , Kern AD , Kuhn RM , Smith KE , Zwieg AS
Ref : Science , 316 :222 , 2007
Abstract : The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2007_Science_316_222
PubMedID: 17431167
Gene_locus related to this paper: macmu-3neur , macmu-ACHE , macmu-BCHE , macmu-f6rul6 , macmu-f6sz31 , macmu-f6the6 , macmu-f6unj2 , macmu-f6wtx1 , macmu-f6zkq5 , macmu-f7aa58 , macmu-f7ai42 , macmu-f7aim4 , macmu-f7buk8 , macmu-f7cfi8 , macmu-f7cnr2 , macmu-f7cu68 , macmu-f7flv1 , macmu-f7ggk1 , macmu-f7hir7 , macmu-g7n054 , macmu-KANSL3 , macmu-TEX30 , macmu-Y4neur , macmu-g7n4x3 , macmu-i2cy02 , macmu-f7ba84 , macmu-CES2 , macmu-h9er02 , macmu-a0a1d5rbr3 , macmu-a0a1d5q4k5 , macmu-g7mxj6 , macmu-f7dn71 , macmu-f7hkw9 , macmu-f7hm08 , macmu-g7mke4 , macmu-a0a1d5rh04 , macmu-h9fud6 , macmu-f6qwx1 , macmu-f7h4t2 , macmu-h9zaw9 , macmu-f7h550 , macmu-a0a1d5q9w1 , macmu-f7gkb9 , macmu-f7hp78 , macmu-a0a1d5qvu5