Geng J

References (9)

Title : Neuroligin 2 governs synaptic morphology and function through RACK1-cofilin signaling in Drosophila - Sun_2023_Commun.Biol_6_1056
Author(s) : Sun Y , Li M , Geng J , Meng S , Tu R , Zhuang Y , Sun M , Rui M , Ou M , Xing G , Johnson TK , Xie W
Ref : Commun Biol , 6 :1056 , 2023
Abstract : Neuroligins are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins well-known for their genetic links to autism spectrum disorders. Neuroligins can function by regulating the actin cytoskeleton, however the factors and mechanisms involved are still largely unknown. Here, using the Drosophila neuromuscular junction as a model, we reveal that F-Actin assembly at the Drosophila NMJ is controlled through Cofilin signaling mediated by an interaction between DNlg2 and RACK1, factors not previously known to work together. The deletion of DNlg2 displays disrupted RACK1-Cofilin signaling pathway with diminished actin cytoskeleton proteo-stasis at the terminal of the NMJ, aberrant NMJ structure, reduced synaptic transmission, and abnormal locomotion at the third-instar larval stage. Overexpression of wildtype and activated Cofilin in muscles are sufficient to rescue the morphological and physiological defects in dnlg2 mutants, while inactivated Cofilin is not. Since the DNlg2 paralog DNlg1 is known to regulate F-actin assembly mainly via a specific interaction with WAVE complex, our present work suggests that the orchestration of F-actin by Neuroligins is a diverse and complex process critical for neural connectivity.
ESTHER : Sun_2023_Commun.Biol_6_1056
PubMedSearch : Sun_2023_Commun.Biol_6_1056
PubMedID: 37853189

Title : Pesticide Residues in Commonly Consumed Vegetables in Henan Province of China in 2020 - Ma_2022_Front.Public.Health_10_901485
Author(s) : Ma C , Wei D , Liu P , Fan K , Nie L , Song Y , Wang M , Wang L , Xu Q , Wang J , Shi J , Geng J , Zhao M , Jia Z , Huan C , Huo W , Wang C , Mao Z , Huang S , Zeng X
Ref : Front Public Health , 10 :901485 , 2022
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to control insect pests and regulate plant growth in China, which may result in the presence of some pesticide residues in the vegetables. However, few studies of monitoring pesticides have been conducted in Henan Province. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of pesticide residues in commonly consumed vegetables in the regions of Henan Province. METHODS: In this study, we collected 5,576 samples of 15 different vegetables in 17 areas from Henan Province during 2020. Eight kinds of pesticides were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), including procymidone, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, pendimethalin, isocarbophos, isazophos, fenthion and deltamethrin. The chi-square test was used to compare the detection rates of pesticide residues in different regions. RESULTS: Of all the pesticides above, procymidone, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, pendimethalin and isocarbophos were detected in vegetables, the detection rates were 27.0%, 16.2%, 11.4%, 3.5%, and 1.9%, respectively. However, isazophos, fenthion, and deltamethrin were not detected. In addition, procymidone, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cypermethrin were detected in urban areas, while pendimethalin was detected in rural areas. The detection rates of cypermethrin and pendimethalin in rural were 19.8% and 5.4%, respectively, which in urban were at relatively lower levels (13.7% and 1.9%, respectively) (P < 0.05). Compared the differences of pesticide detection rates among five areas of Henan province, we found that there were statistical differences in the detection rates of procymidone, cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin in different regions (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results have revealed that the pesticide residues are present. Higher detection rates and more types of pesticides were found in rural areas than urban areas. In addition, there were higher detection rates in Eastern Henan. The findings provided valuable information on the current pesticide residues status, which can be a reference of pesticide supervision and management.
ESTHER : Ma_2022_Front.Public.Health_10_901485
PubMedSearch : Ma_2022_Front.Public.Health_10_901485
PubMedID: 35757605

Title : Efficacy and safety of DBPR108 (prusogliptin) as an add-on to metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A 24-week, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, superiority, phase III clinical trial - Xu_2022_Diabetes.Obes.Metab__
Author(s) : Xu J , Ling H , Geng J , Huang Y , Xie Y , Zheng H , Niu H , Zhang T , Yuan J , Xiao X
Ref : Diabetes Obes Metab , : , 2022
Abstract : AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of DBPR108 (prusogliptin), a novel dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, as an add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that is inadequately controlled with metformin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this 24-week, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, superiority, phase III study, adult T2DM patients with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels ranging from 7.0-9.5% on stable metformin were enrolled and randomized (2:1) into the DBPR108+metformin and placebo+metformin groups. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in HbA1c at week 24 of DBPR108 versus placebo as an add-on therapy to metformin. RESULTS: At week 24, the least-square (LS) mean (standard error [SE]) change from baseline in HbA1c was significantly greater in the DBPR108 group (-0.70% [0.09%]) than that in the placebo group (-0.07% [0.11%]) (P-value <0.001), with a treatment difference of -0.63% (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.87, -0.39) on full analysis set. A higher proportion of patients achieved an HbA1c >=6.5% (19.7% vs. 8.5%) and HbA1c >=7.0% (50.0% vs. 21.1%) at week 24 in the DBPR108+metformin group. Furthermore, add-on DBPR108 produced greater reductions from baseline in fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose (2-h PPG) without causing weight gain. The overall frequency of adverse events (AEs) was similar between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: DBPR108 as add-on therapy to metformin offered a significant improvement in glycemic control, was superior to metformin monotherapy (placebo), and was safe and well-tolerated in T2DM patients that is inadequately controlled with metformin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
ESTHER : Xu_2022_Diabetes.Obes.Metab__
PubMedSearch : Xu_2022_Diabetes.Obes.Metab__
PubMedID: 35791646

Title : Toxicological effects of nano- and micro-polystyrene plastics on red tilapia: Are larger plastic particles more harmless? - Ding_2020_J.Hazard.Mater_396_122693
Author(s) : Ding J , Huang Y , Liu S , Zhang S , Zou H , Wang Z , Zhu W , Geng J
Ref : J Hazard Mater , 396 :122693 , 2020
Abstract : Nanoplastics (NPs) and microplastics (MPs) are a heterogeneous class of pollutants with diverse sizes in aquatic environments. To evaluate the hazardous effects of N/MPs with different sizes, the accumulation, oxidative stress, cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, neurotoxicity, and metabolomics changes were investigated in the red tilapia exposed to three sizes of polystyrene (PS) N/MPs (0.3, 5, and 70-90mum). After 14-d exposures, the largest particles (70-90mum) showed the highest accumulation levels in most cases. Exposures to PS-MPs (5 and 70-90mum) caused a more severe oxidative stress in red tilapia than PS-NPs. The activity of CYP3A-related enzyme was obviously inhibited by PS-NPs, whereas the CYP enzymes in the liver may not be sensitive to MP exposures. In the brain, only 5mumPS-MPs significantly inhibited the acetylcholinesterase activity. After exposures, the treatments with 0.3, 5, and 70-90mum N/MPs resulted in 31, 40, and 23 significantly differentially expressed metabolites, respectively, in which the pathway of tyrosine metabolism was significantly affected by all the three PS-N/MP exposures. Overall, the PS particles within the mum size posed more severe stress to red tilapia. Our results suggest that the toxicity of N/MPs may not show a simply monotonic negative correlation with their sizes.
ESTHER : Ding_2020_J.Hazard.Mater_396_122693
PubMedSearch : Ding_2020_J.Hazard.Mater_396_122693
PubMedID: 32353735

Title : Thiol inhibition of Hg cold vapor generation in SnCl2\/NaBH4 system: A homogeneous bioassay for H2O2\/glucose and butyrylcholinesterase\/pesticide sensing by atomic spectrometry - Chen_2020_Anal.Chim.Acta_1111_8
Author(s) : Chen P , Zheng C , Chen C , Huang K , Wang X , Hu P , Geng J
Ref : Anal Chim Acta , 1111 :8 , 2020
Abstract : Recently, the use of atomic spectrometry (AS) for biochemical analysis has attracted considerable attention due to its high sensitivity, selectivity and anti-interference ability. In this work, we conducted a detailed study on a phenomenon of thiol inhibition of mercury (Hg(2+)) cold vapor generation (CVG) and found L-cysteine (L-Cys), glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, beta-mercaptoethanol, and NaI can inhibit the CVG of Hg(2+), while EDTA has no inhibitory effect. Furthermore, changing the content of -SH can effectively adjust the CVG atomic fluorescence spectrometer (CVG-AFS) signal of Hg(2+). As as a consequence, an AS-based homogeneous bioassay was constructed by adjusting the oxidation ratio and production quantity of -SH in the system. The quantitative analysis of the system was demonstrated by using AFS as a representative detector. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glucose were used as representative analytes for the validation of Hg(2+) atomic fluorescence signal turn-off strategy, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as well as parathion (organophosphorus pesticides, OPs) as utilized as representative targets for the signal turn-on strategy. Under optimal experimental conditions, the homogeneous CVG-AFS sensor can be successfully used to detect 3 muM H2O2, 30 muM glucose, 0.25 U/L BChE, and 0.4 mug/mL parathion. In addition, the detection results of glucose and BChE in human serum samples agreed well with those obtained by using glucometer and kit, showing the promising potential of this method for practical applications. Therefore, this work provides a perspective for the construction of AS-based homogeneous bioassays and shows great potential for the detection of biomarkers.
ESTHER : Chen_2020_Anal.Chim.Acta_1111_8
PubMedSearch : Chen_2020_Anal.Chim.Acta_1111_8
PubMedID: 32312400

Title : Complete genome and transcriptomes of Streptococcus parasanguinis FW213: phylogenic relations and potential virulence mechanisms - Geng_2012_PLoS.One_7_e34769
Author(s) : Geng J , Chiu CH , Tang P , Chen Y , Shieh HR , Hu S , Chen YY
Ref : PLoS ONE , 7 :e34769 , 2012
Abstract : Streptococcus parasanguinis, a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, is also an opportunistic pathogen for subacute endocarditis. The complete genome of strain FW213 was determined using the traditional shotgun sequencing approach and further refined by the transcriptomes of cells in early exponential and early stationary growth phases in this study. The transcriptomes also discovered 10 transcripts encoding known hypothetical proteins, one pseudogene, five transcripts matched to the Rfam and additional 87 putative small RNAs within the intergenic regions defined by the GLIMMER analysis. The genome contains five acquired genomic islands (GIs) encoding proteins which potentially contribute to the overall pathogenic capacity and fitness of this microbe. The differential expression of the GIs and various open reading frames outside the GIs at the two growth phases suggested that FW213 possess a range of mechanisms to avoid host immune clearance, to colonize host tissues, to survive within oral biofilms and to overcome various environmental insults. Furthermore, the comparative genome analysis of five S. parasanguinis strains indicates that albeit S. parasanguinis strains are highly conserved, variations in the genome content exist. These variations may reflect differences in pathogenic potential between the strains.
ESTHER : Geng_2012_PLoS.One_7_e34769
PubMedSearch : Geng_2012_PLoS.One_7_e34769
PubMedID: 22529932

Title : Complete genome sequence of the ureolytic Streptococcus salivarius strain 57.I - Geng_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5596
Author(s) : Geng J , Huang SC , Li S , Hu S , Chen YY
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :5596 , 2011
Abstract : Streptococcus salivarius 57.I is one of the most abundant and highly ureolytic bacteria in the human mouth. It can utilize urea as the sole nitrogen source via the activity of urease. Complete genome sequencing of S. salivarius 57.I revealed a chromosome and a phage which are absent in strain SK126.
ESTHER : Geng_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5596
PubMedSearch : Geng_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5596
PubMedID: 21914897

Title : Genome sequence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain F2, a bioflocculant-producing bacterium - Li_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5531
Author(s) : Li A , Geng J , Cui D , Shu C , Zhang S , Yang J , Xing J , Wang J , Ma F , Hu S
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :5531 , 2011
Abstract : Agrobacterium tumefaciens F2 is an efficient bioflocculant-producing bacterium. But the genes related to the metabolic pathway of bioflocculant biosynthesis in strain F2 are unknown. We present the draft genome of A. tumefaciens F2. It could provide further insight into the biosynthetic mechanism of polysaccharide-like bioflocculant in strain F2.
ESTHER : Li_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5531
PubMedSearch : Li_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5531
PubMedID: 21914861
Gene_locus related to this paper: rhird-f7u6g7

Title : The Genomes of Oryza sativa: a history of duplications - Yu_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e38
Author(s) : Yu J , Wang J , Lin W , Li S , Li H , Zhou J , Ni P , Dong W , Hu S , Zeng C , Zhang J , Zhang Y , Li R , Xu Z , Li X , Zheng H , Cong L , Lin L , Yin J , Geng J , Li G , Shi J , Liu J , Lv H , Li J , Deng Y , Ran L , Shi X , Wang X , Wu Q , Li C , Ren X , Li D , Liu D , Zhang X , Ji Z , Zhao W , Sun Y , Zhang Z , Bao J , Han Y , Dong L , Ji J , Chen P , Wu S , Xiao Y , Bu D , Tan J , Yang L , Ye C , Xu J , Zhou Y , Yu Y , Zhang B , Zhuang S , Wei H , Liu B , Lei M , Yu H , Li Y , Xu H , Wei S , He X , Fang L , Huang X , Su Z , Tong W , Tong Z , Ye J , Wang L , Lei T , Chen C , Chen H , Huang H , Zhang F , Li N , Zhao C , Huang Y , Li L , Xi Y , Qi Q , Li W , Hu W , Tian X , Jiao Y , Liang X , Jin J , Gao L , Zheng W , Hao B , Liu S , Wang W , Yuan L , Cao M , McDermott J , Samudrala R , Wong GK , Yang H
Ref : PLoS Biol , 3 :e38 , 2005
Abstract : We report improved whole-genome shotgun sequences for the genomes of indica and japonica rice, both with multimegabase contiguity, or almost 1,000-fold improvement over the drafts of 2002. Tested against a nonredundant collection of 19,079 full-length cDNAs, 97.7% of the genes are aligned, without fragmentation, to the mapped super-scaffolds of one or the other genome. We introduce a gene identification procedure for plants that does not rely on similarity to known genes to remove erroneous predictions resulting from transposable elements. Using the available EST data to adjust for residual errors in the predictions, the estimated gene count is at least 38,000-40,000. Only 2%-3% of the genes are unique to any one subspecies, comparable to the amount of sequence that might still be missing. Despite this lack of variation in gene content, there is enormous variation in the intergenic regions. At least a quarter of the two sequences could not be aligned, and where they could be aligned, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rates varied from as little as 3.0 SNP/kb in the coding regions to 27.6 SNP/kb in the transposable elements. A more inclusive new approach for analyzing duplication history is introduced here. It reveals an ancient whole-genome duplication, a recent segmental duplication on Chromosomes 11 and 12, and massive ongoing individual gene duplications. We find 18 distinct pairs of duplicated segments that cover 65.7% of the genome; 17 of these pairs date back to a common time before the divergence of the grasses. More important, ongoing individual gene duplications provide a never-ending source of raw material for gene genesis and are major contributors to the differences between members of the grass family.
ESTHER : Yu_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e38
PubMedSearch : Yu_2005_PLoS.Biol_3_e38
PubMedID: 15685292
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q7XTC5 , orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8GSE8 , orysa-Q9S7P1 , orysa-Q9FYP7 , orysa-Q5ZBH3 , orysa-Q5ZA26 , orysa-Q5JLP6 , orysa-Q8H5P9 , orysa-Q8H5P5 , orysa-Q7F1Y5 , orysa-Q949C9 , orysa-cbp1 , orysa-cbp3 , orysa-cbpx , orysa-Q33B71 , orysa-Q8GSJ3 , orysa-LPL1 , orysa-Q6YSZ8 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q8LIG3 , orysa-Q6K7F5 , orysa-Q7F1B1 , orysa-Q8H4S9 , orysa-Q69UB1 , orysa-Q9FW17 , orysa-Q337C3 , orysa-Q7F959 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-Q6YTH5 , orysa-Q0JK71 , orysa-Q8S1D9 , orysa-Q5N8V4 , orysa-Q0JCY4 , orysa-Q8GTK2 , orysa-B9EWJ8 , orysa-Q8H3K6 , orysa-Q6ZDG8 , orysa-Q6ZDG6 , orysa-Q6ZDG5 , orysa-Q6ZDG4 , orysa-Q5NAI4 , orysa-Q658B2 , orysa-Q5JMQ8 , orysa-Q5QMD9 , orysa-Q5N7L1 , orysa-Q8RYV9 , orysa-Q8H3R3 , orysa-Q5SNH3 , orysa-Q8W0F0 , orysa-pir7a , orysa-pir7b , orysa-q2qlm4 , orysa-q2qm78 , orysa-q2qm82 , orysa-q2qn31 , orysa-q2qnj4 , orysa-q2qnt9 , orysa-q2qur1 , orysa-q2qx94 , orysa-q2qyi1 , orysa-q2qyj1 , orysa-q2r051 , orysa-q2r077 , orysa-q2ram0 , orysa-q2rat1 , orysa-q2rbb3 , orysa-Q4VWY7 , orysa-q5na00 , orysa-q5nbu1 , orysa-Q5QLC0 , orysa-q5smv5 , orysa-Q5VP27 , orysa-q5vrt2 , orysa-q5w6c5 , orysa-q5z5a3 , orysa-q5z9i2 , orysa-q5z417 , orysa-q5z901 , orysa-Q5ZAM8 , orysa-Q5ZBI5 , orysa-Q5ZCR3 , orysa-q6atz0 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysa-q6f358 , orysa-q6h6s1 , orysa-q6h7i6 , orysa-q6i5q3 , orysa-q6i5u7 , orysa-q6j657 , orysa-q6k3d9 , orysa-q6k4q2 , orysa-q6k880 , orysa-q6l5b6 , orysa-Q6L5F5 , orysa-q6l556 , orysj-q6yse8 , orysa-q6yy42 , orysa-q6yzk1 , orysa-q6z8b1 , orysa-q6z995 , orysa-q6zc62 , orysa-q6zia4 , orysa-q6zjq6 , orysa-q7x7y5 , orysa-Q7XC50 , orysa-q7xej4 , orysa-q7xem8 , orysa-q7xkj9 , orysa-q7xr62 , orysa-q7xr63 , orysa-q7xr64 , orysa-q7xsg1 , orysa-q7xsq2 , orysa-q7xts6 , orysa-q7xv53 , orysa-Q7XVB5 , orysa-Q8L562 , orysa-Q8LQS5 , orysa-Q8RZ40 , orysa-Q8RZ79 , orysa-Q8S0U8 , orysa-Q8S0V0 , orysa-Q8S125 , orysa-Q8SAY7 , orysa-Q8SAY9 , orysa-Q8W3C6 , orysa-Q8W3F2 , orysa-Q8W3F4 , orysa-Q8W3F6 , orysa-Q9LHX5 , orysa-q33aq0 , orysa-q53lh1 , orysa-q53m20 , orysa-q53nd8 , orysa-q60e79 , orysa-q60ew8 , orysa-q67iz2 , orysa-q67iz3 , orysa-q67iz7 , orysa-q67iz8 , orysa-q67j02 , orysa-q67j05 , orysa-q67j07 , orysa-q67j09 , orysa-q67j10 , orysa-q67tr6 , orysa-q67tv0 , orysa-q67uz1 , orysa-q67v34 , orysa-q67wz5 , orysa-q69j38 , orysa-q69k08 , orysa-q69md7 , orysa-q69me0 , orysa-q69pf3 , orysa-q69ti3 , orysa-q69xr2 , orysa-q69y12 , orysa-q69y21 , orysa-q75hy2 , orysa-q75i01 , orysa-Q94JD7 , orysa-Q0J0A4 , orysa-q651a8 , orysa-q651z3 , orysa-q652g4 , orysa-q688m0 , orysa-q688m8 , orysa-q688m9 , orysa-Q6H8G1 , orysi-a2wn01 , orysi-a2xc83 , orysi-a2yh83 , orysi-a2z179 , orysi-a2zef2 , orysi-b8a7e6 , orysi-b8a7e7 , orysi-b8bfe5 , orysi-b8bhp9 , orysj-a3b9l8 , orysj-b9eub8 , orysj-b9eya5 , orysj-b9fi05 , orysj-b9fkb0 , orysj-b9fn42 , orysj-b9gbb7 , orysj-cgep , orysj-PLA7 , orysj-q0d4u5 , orysj-q0djj0 , orysj-q0jaf0 , orysj-q5jl22 , orysj-q5jlw7 , orysj-q5z419 , orysj-q6h7q9 , orysj-q6yvk6 , orysj-q6z6i1 , orysj-q7f8x1 , orysj-q7xcx3 , orysj-q9fwm6 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2 , orysj-q69uw6 , orysj-q94d71 , orysj-q338c0 , orysi-b8bly4 , orysj-b9gbs4 , orysi-a2zb88 , orysj-b9gbs1 , orysi-b8b698 , orysj-pla4 , orysj-pla1