de Daruvar A

References (5)

Title : Life on arginine for Mycoplasma hominis: clues from its minimal genome and comparison with other human urogenital mycoplasmas - Pereyre_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000677
Author(s) : Pereyre S , Sirand-Pugnet P , Beven L , Charron A , Renaudin H , Barre A , Avenaud P , Jacob D , Couloux A , Barbe V , de Daruvar A , Blanchard A , Bebear C
Ref : PLoS Genet , 5 :e1000677 , 2009
Abstract : Mycoplasma hominis is an opportunistic human mycoplasma. Two other pathogenic human species, M. genitalium and Ureaplasma parvum, reside within the same natural niche as M. hominis: the urogenital tract. These three species have overlapping, but distinct, pathogenic roles. They have minimal genomes and, thus, reduced metabolic capabilities characterized by distinct energy-generating pathways. Analysis of the M. hominis PG21 genome sequence revealed that it is the second smallest genome among self-replicating free living organisms (665,445 bp, 537 coding sequences (CDSs)). Five clusters of genes were predicted to have undergone horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between M. hominis and the phylogenetically distant U. parvum species. We reconstructed M. hominis metabolic pathways from the predicted genes, with particular emphasis on energy-generating pathways. The Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas pathway was incomplete, with a single enzyme absent. We identified the three proteins constituting the arginine dihydrolase pathway. This pathway was found essential to promote growth in vivo. The predicted presence of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase suggested that arginine catabolism is more complex than initially described. This enzyme may have been acquired by HGT from non-mollicute bacteria. Comparison of the three minimal mollicute genomes showed that 247 CDSs were common to all three genomes, whereas 220 CDSs were specific to M. hominis, 172 CDSs were specific to M. genitalium, and 280 CDSs were specific to U. parvum. Within these species-specific genes, two major sets of genes could be identified: one including genes involved in various energy-generating pathways, depending on the energy source used (glucose, urea, or arginine) and another involved in cytadherence and virulence. Therefore, a minimal mycoplasma cell, not including cytadherence and virulence-related genes, could be envisaged containing a core genome (247 genes), plus a set of genes required for providing energy. For M. hominis, this set would include 247+9 genes, resulting in a theoretical minimal genome of 256 genes.
ESTHER : Pereyre_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000677
PubMedSearch : Pereyre_2009_PLoS.Genet_5_e1000677
PubMedID: 19816563
Gene_locus related to this paper: mychp-d1j8v6

Title : Being pathogenic, plastic, and sexual while living with a nearly minimal bacterial genome - Sirand-Pugnet_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e75
Author(s) : Sirand-Pugnet P , Lartigue C , Marenda M , Jacob D , Barre A , Barbe V , Schenowitz C , Mangenot S , Couloux A , Segurens B , de Daruvar A , Blanchard A , Citti C
Ref : PLoS Genet , 3 :e75 , 2007
Abstract : Mycoplasmas are commonly described as the simplest self-replicating organisms, whose evolution was mainly characterized by genome downsizing with a proposed evolutionary scenario similar to that of obligate intracellular bacteria such as insect endosymbionts. Thus far, analysis of mycoplasma genomes indicates a low level of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) implying that DNA acquisition is strongly limited in these minimal bacteria. In this study, the genome of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae was sequenced. Comparative genomic data and phylogenetic tree reconstruction revealed that approximately 18% of its small genome (877,438 bp) has undergone HGT with the phylogenetically distinct mycoides cluster, which is composed of significant ruminant pathogens. HGT involves genes often found as clusters, several of which encode lipoproteins that usually play an important role in mycoplasma-host interaction. A decayed form of a conjugative element also described in a member of the mycoides cluster was found in the M. agalactiae genome, suggesting that HGT may have occurred by mobilizing a related genetic element. The possibility of HGT events among other mycoplasmas was evaluated with the available sequenced genomes. Our data indicate marginal levels of HGT among Mycoplasma species except for those described above and, to a lesser extent, for those observed in between the two bird pathogens, M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. This first description of large-scale HGT among mycoplasmas sharing the same ecological niche challenges the generally accepted evolutionary scenario in which gene loss is the main driving force of mycoplasma evolution. The latter clearly differs from that of other bacteria with small genomes, particularly obligate intracellular bacteria that are isolated within host cells. Consequently, mycoplasmas are not only able to subvert complex hosts but presumably have retained sexual competence, a trait that may prevent them from genome stasis and contribute to adaptation to new hosts.
ESTHER : Sirand-Pugnet_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e75
PubMedSearch : Sirand-Pugnet_2007_PLoS.Genet_3_e75
PubMedID: 17511520
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycap-a5ixe1 , mycap-a5ixe2 , mycap-a5ixk0 , mycap-a5ixt9 , mycap-a5iy19 , mycap-a5iza3 , mycap-a5ixl0

Title : Large-scale identification of human genes implicated in epidermal barrier function - Toulza_2007_Genome.Biol_8_R107
Author(s) : Toulza E , Mattiuzzo NR , Galliano MF , Jonca N , Dossat C , Jacob D , de Daruvar A , Wincker P , Serre G , Guerrin M
Ref : Genome Biol , 8 :R107 , 2007
Abstract : BACKGROUND: During epidermal differentiation, keratinocytes progressing through the suprabasal layers undergo complex and tightly regulated biochemical modifications leading to cornification and desquamation. The last living cells, the granular keratinocytes (GKs), produce almost all of the proteins and lipids required for the protective barrier function before their programmed cell death gives rise to corneocytes. We present here the first analysis of the transcriptome of human GKs, purified from healthy epidermis by an original approach. RESULTS: Using the ORESTES method, 22,585 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced that matched 3,387 genes. Despite normalization provided by this method (mean 4.6 ORESTES per gene), some highly transcribed genes, including that encoding dermokine, were overrepresented. About 330 expressed genes displayed less than 100 ESTs in UniGene clusters and are most likely to be specific for GKs and potentially involved in barrier function. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative expression of 73 genes in the basal and granular layers of epidermis by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, 33 were identified as new, highly specific markers of GKs, including those encoding a protease, protease inhibitors and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. We identified filaggrin 2 (also called ifapsoriasin), a poorly characterized member of the epidermal differentiation complex, as well as three new lipase genes clustered with paralogous genes on chromosome 10q23.31. A new gene of unknown function, C1orf81, is specifically disrupted in the human genome by a frameshift mutation. CONCLUSION: These data increase the present knowledge of genes responsible for the formation of the skin barrier and suggest new candidates for genodermatoses of unknown origin.
ESTHER : Toulza_2007_Genome.Biol_8_R107
PubMedSearch : Toulza_2007_Genome.Biol_8_R107
PubMedID: 17562024

Title : Genome evolution in yeasts - Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
Author(s) : Dujon B , Sherman D , Fischer G , Durrens P , Casaregola S , Lafontaine I , De Montigny J , Marck C , Neuveglise C , Talla E , Goffard N , Frangeul L , Aigle M , Anthouard V , Babour A , Barbe V , Barnay S , Blanchin S , Beckerich JM , Beyne E , Bleykasten C , Boisrame A , Boyer J , Cattolico L , Confanioleri F , de Daruvar A , Despons L , Fabre E , Fairhead C , Ferry-Dumazet H , Groppi A , Hantraye F , Hennequin C , Jauniaux N , Joyet P , Kachouri R , Kerrest A , Koszul R , Lemaire M , Lesur I , Ma L , Muller H , Nicaud JM , Nikolski M , Oztas S , Ozier-Kalogeropoulos O , Pellenz S , Potier S , Richard GF , Straub ML , Suleau A , Swennen D , Tekaia F , Wesolowski-Louvel M , Westhof E , Wirth B , Zeniou-Meyer M , Zivanovic I , Bolotin-Fukuhara M , Thierry A , Bouchier C , Caudron B , Scarpelli C , Gaillardin C , Weissenbach J , Wincker P , Souciet JL
Ref : Nature , 430 :35 , 2004
Abstract : Identifying the mechanisms of eukaryotic genome evolution by comparative genomics is often complicated by the multiplicity of events that have taken place throughout the history of individual lineages, leaving only distorted and superimposed traces in the genome of each living organism. The hemiascomycete yeasts, with their compact genomes, similar lifestyle and distinct sexual and physiological properties, provide a unique opportunity to explore such mechanisms. We present here the complete, assembled genome sequences of four yeast species, selected to represent a broad evolutionary range within a single eukaryotic phylum, that after analysis proved to be molecularly as diverse as the entire phylum of chordates. A total of approximately 24,200 novel genes were identified, the translation products of which were classified together with Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins into about 4,700 families, forming the basis for interspecific comparisons. Analysis of chromosome maps and genome redundancies reveal that the different yeast lineages have evolved through a marked interplay between several distinct molecular mechanisms, including tandem gene repeat formation, segmental duplication, a massive genome duplication and extensive gene loss.
ESTHER : Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
PubMedSearch : Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
PubMedID: 15229592
Gene_locus related to this paper: canga-apth1 , canga-ppme1 , canga-q6fik7 , canga-q6fiv5 , canga-q6fiw8 , canga-q6fj11 , canga-q6fjh6 , canga-q6fjl0 , canga-q6fjr8 , canga-q6fkj6 , canga-q6fkm9 , canga-q6fku7 , canga-q6fl14 , canga-q6flb5 , canga-q6fle9 , canga-q6flk8 , canga-q6fly1 , canga-q6fly9 , canga-q6fmz4 , canga-q6fnx4 , canga-q6fp28 , canga-q6fpa8 , canga-q6fpi6 , canga-q6fpv7 , canga-q6fpw6 , canga-q6fqj3 , canga-q6fr97 , canga-q6frt7 , canga-q6ftm9 , canga-q6ftu0 , canga-q6ftv9 , canga-q6ftz9 , canga-q6fuf8 , canga-q6fv41 , canga-q6fvu3 , canga-q6fw36 , canga-q6fw94 , canga-q6fwk6 , canga-q6fwm0 , canga-q6fxc7 , canga-q6fxd7 , debha-apth1 , debha-atg15 , debha-b5rtk1 , debha-b5rub4 , debha-b5rue8 , debha-b5rue9 , debha-bna7 , debha-ppme1 , debha-q6bgx3 , debha-q6bh69 , debha-q6bhb8 , debha-q6bhc1 , debha-q6bhd0 , debha-q6bhj7 , debha-q6bi97 , debha-q6biq7 , debha-q6bj53 , debha-q6bkd8 , debha-q6bks1 , debha-q6bky4 , debha-q6bm63 , debha-q6bmh3 , debha-q6bn89 , debha-q6bnj6 , debha-q6bp08 , debha-q6bpb4 , debha-q6bpc0 , debha-q6bpc6 , debha-q6bq10 , debha-q6bq11 , debha-q6bqd9 , debha-q6bqj6 , debha-q6br33 , debha-q6br93 , debha-q6brg1 , debha-q6brw7 , debha-q6bs23 , debha-q6bsc3 , debha-q6bsl8 , debha-q6bsx6 , debha-q6bta5 , debha-q6bty5 , debha-q6btz0 , debha-q6bu73 , debha-q6buk9 , debha-q6but7 , debha-q6bvc4 , debha-q6bvg4 , debha-q6bvg8 , debha-q6bvp4 , debha-q6bw82 , debha-q6bxr7 , debha-q6bxu9 , debha-q6bym5 , debha-q6byn7 , debha-q6bzj8 , debha-q6bzk2 , debha-q6bzm5 , klula-apth1 , klula-ppme1 , klula-q6cin9 , klula-q6ciu6 , klula-q6cj47 , klula-q6cjc8 , klula-q6cjq9 , klula-q6cjs1 , klula-q6cjv9 , klula-q6ckd7 , klula-q6ckk4 , klula-q6ckx4 , klula-q6cl20 , klula-q6clm1 , klula-q6cly8 , klula-q6clz7 , klula-q6cm48 , klula-q6cm49 , klula-q6cmt5 , klula-q6cn71 , klula-q6cnm1 , klula-q6cr74 , klula-q6cr90 , klula-q6crs0 , klula-q6crv8 , klula-q6crz9 , klula-q6cst8 , klula-q6csv8 , klula-q6ctp8 , klula-q6cu02 , klula-q6cu78 , klula-q6cu79 , klula-q6cuv3 , klula-q6cvd3 , klula-q6cw70 , klula-q6cw92 , klula-q6cwu7 , klula-q6cx84 , klula-q6cxa3 , klula-q6cy41 , yarli-apth1 , yarli-atg15 , yarli-BST1B , yarli-lip2 , yarli-LIP3 , yarli-LIP4 , yarli-LIP5 , yarli-LIP7 , yarli-LIP8 , yarli-lipa1 , yarli-ppme1 , yarli-q6bzp1 , yarli-q6bzv7 , yarli-q6c1f5 , yarli-q6c1f7 , yarli-q6c1r3 , yarli-q6c2z2 , yarli-q6c3h1 , yarli-q6c3i6 , yarli-q6c3l1 , yarli-q6c3u6 , yarli-q6c4h8 , yarli-q6c5j1 , yarli-q6c5m4 , yarli-q6c6m4 , yarli-q6c6p7 , yarli-q6c6v2 , yarli-q6c7h3 , yarli-q6c7i7 , yarli-q6c7j5 , yarli-q6c7y6 , yarli-q6c8m4 , yarli-q6c8q4 , yarli-q6c8u4 , yarli-q6c8y2 , yarli-q6c9r0 , yarli-q6c9r1 , yarli-q6c9u0 , yarli-q6c9v4 , yarli-q6c209 , yarli-q6c225 , yarli-q6c493 , yarli-q6c598 , yarli-q6c687 , yarli-q6c822 , yarli-q6cau6 , yarli-q6cax2 , yarli-q6caz1 , yarli-q6cb63 , yarli-q6cba7 , yarli-q6cbb1 , yarli-q6cbe6 , yarli-q6cby1 , yarli-q6ccr0 , yarli-q6cdg1 , yarli-q6cdi6 , yarli-q6cdv9 , yarli-q6ce37 , yarli-q6ceg0 , yarli-q6cep3 , yarli-q6cey5 , yarli-q6cf60 , yarli-q6cfp3 , yarli-q6cfx2 , yarli-q6cg13 , yarli-q6cg27 , yarli-q6cgj3 , yarli-q6chb8 , yarli-q6ci59 , yarli-q6c748 , canga-q6fpj0 , klula-q6cp11 , yarli-q6c4p0 , debha-q6btp5 , debha-kex1

Title : Comparative genomics of Listeria species - Glaser_2001_Science_294_849
Author(s) : Glaser P , Frangeul L , Buchrieser C , Rusniok C , Amend A , Baquero F , Berche P , Bloecker H , Brandt P , Chakraborty T , Charbit A , Chetouani F , Couve E , de Daruvar A , Dehoux P , Domann E , Dominguez-Bernal G , Duchaud E , Durant L , Dussurget O , Entian KD , Fsihi H , Portillo FG , Garrido P , Gautier L , Goebel W , Gomez-Lopez N , Hain T , Hauf J , Jackson D , Jones LM , Kaerst U , Kreft J , Kuhn M , Kunst F , Kurapkat G , Madueno E , Maitournam A , Vicente JM , Ng E , Nedjari H , Nordsiek G , Novella S , de Pablos B , Perez-Diaz JC , Purcell R , Remmel B , Rose M , Schlueter T , Simoes N , Tierrez A , Vazquez-Boland JA , Voss H , Wehland J , Cossart P
Ref : Science , 294 :849 , 2001
Abstract : Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen with a high mortality rate that has also emerged as a paradigm for intracellular parasitism. We present and compare the genome sequences of L. monocytogenes (2,944,528 base pairs) and a nonpathogenic species, L. innocua (3,011,209 base pairs). We found a large number of predicted genes encoding surface and secreted proteins, transporters, and transcriptional regulators, consistent with the ability of both species to adapt to diverse environments. The presence of 270 L. monocytogenes and 149 L. innocua strain-specific genes (clustered in 100 and 63 islets, respectively) suggests that virulence in Listeria results from multiple gene acquisition and deletion events.
ESTHER : Glaser_2001_Science_294_849
PubMedSearch : Glaser_2001_Science_294_849
PubMedID: 11679669
Gene_locus related to this paper: lisin-LIN0589 , lisin-LIN0754 , lisin-LIN0850 , lisin-LIN0949 , lisin-LIN0950 , lisin-LIN0976 , lisin-LIN1094 , lisin-LIN1546 , lisin-LIN1782 , lisin-LIN2180 , lisin-LIN2214 , lisin-LIN2363 , lisin-LIN2527 , lisin-LIN2544 , lisin-LIN2547 , lisin-LIN2722 , lisin-LIN2825 , lisin-LIN2898 , lismc-c1l0d9 , lismo-LMO0110 , lismo-LMO0493 , lismo-LMO0580 , lismo-LMO0752 , lismo-LMO0760 , lismo-LMO0857 , lismo-LMO0950 , lismo-LMO0951 , lismo-LMO0977 , lismo-LMO1128 , lismo-LMO1258 , lismo-LMO1511 , lismo-LMO1674 , lismo-LMO2074 , lismo-LMO2089 , lismo-LMO2109 , lismo-LMO2262 , lismo-LMO2433 , lismo-LMO2450 , lismo-LMO2452 , lismo-LMO2453 , lismo-LMO2578 , lismo-LMO2677 , lismo-LMO2755 , lismo-metx