Boyer J

References (5)

Title : A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease - Sadler_2005_Development_132_3561
Author(s) : Sadler KC , Amsterdam A , Soroka C , Boyer J , Hopkins N
Ref : Development , 132 :3561 , 2005
Abstract : Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease.
ESTHER : Sadler_2005_Development_132_3561
PubMedSearch : Sadler_2005_Development_132_3561
PubMedID: 16000385

Title : Genome evolution in yeasts - Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
Author(s) : Dujon B , Sherman D , Fischer G , Durrens P , Casaregola S , Lafontaine I , De Montigny J , Marck C , Neuveglise C , Talla E , Goffard N , Frangeul L , Aigle M , Anthouard V , Babour A , Barbe V , Barnay S , Blanchin S , Beckerich JM , Beyne E , Bleykasten C , Boisrame A , Boyer J , Cattolico L , Confanioleri F , de Daruvar A , Despons L , Fabre E , Fairhead C , Ferry-Dumazet H , Groppi A , Hantraye F , Hennequin C , Jauniaux N , Joyet P , Kachouri R , Kerrest A , Koszul R , Lemaire M , Lesur I , Ma L , Muller H , Nicaud JM , Nikolski M , Oztas S , Ozier-Kalogeropoulos O , Pellenz S , Potier S , Richard GF , Straub ML , Suleau A , Swennen D , Tekaia F , Wesolowski-Louvel M , Westhof E , Wirth B , Zeniou-Meyer M , Zivanovic I , Bolotin-Fukuhara M , Thierry A , Bouchier C , Caudron B , Scarpelli C , Gaillardin C , Weissenbach J , Wincker P , Souciet JL
Ref : Nature , 430 :35 , 2004
Abstract : Identifying the mechanisms of eukaryotic genome evolution by comparative genomics is often complicated by the multiplicity of events that have taken place throughout the history of individual lineages, leaving only distorted and superimposed traces in the genome of each living organism. The hemiascomycete yeasts, with their compact genomes, similar lifestyle and distinct sexual and physiological properties, provide a unique opportunity to explore such mechanisms. We present here the complete, assembled genome sequences of four yeast species, selected to represent a broad evolutionary range within a single eukaryotic phylum, that after analysis proved to be molecularly as diverse as the entire phylum of chordates. A total of approximately 24,200 novel genes were identified, the translation products of which were classified together with Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins into about 4,700 families, forming the basis for interspecific comparisons. Analysis of chromosome maps and genome redundancies reveal that the different yeast lineages have evolved through a marked interplay between several distinct molecular mechanisms, including tandem gene repeat formation, segmental duplication, a massive genome duplication and extensive gene loss.
ESTHER : Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
PubMedSearch : Dujon_2004_Nature_430_35
PubMedID: 15229592
Gene_locus related to this paper: canga-apth1 , canga-ppme1 , canga-q6fik7 , canga-q6fiv5 , canga-q6fiw8 , canga-q6fj11 , canga-q6fjh6 , canga-q6fjl0 , canga-q6fjr8 , canga-q6fkj6 , canga-q6fkm9 , canga-q6fku7 , canga-q6fl14 , canga-q6flb5 , canga-q6fle9 , canga-q6flk8 , canga-q6fly1 , canga-q6fly9 , canga-q6fmz4 , canga-q6fnx4 , canga-q6fp28 , canga-q6fpa8 , canga-q6fpi6 , canga-q6fpv7 , canga-q6fpw6 , canga-q6fqj3 , canga-q6fr97 , canga-q6frt7 , canga-q6ftm9 , canga-q6ftu0 , canga-q6ftv9 , canga-q6ftz9 , canga-q6fuf8 , canga-q6fv41 , canga-q6fvu3 , canga-q6fw36 , canga-q6fw94 , canga-q6fwk6 , canga-q6fwm0 , canga-q6fxc7 , canga-q6fxd7 , debha-apth1 , debha-atg15 , debha-b5rtk1 , debha-b5rub4 , debha-b5rue8 , debha-b5rue9 , debha-bna7 , debha-ppme1 , debha-q6bgx3 , debha-q6bh69 , debha-q6bhb8 , debha-q6bhc1 , debha-q6bhd0 , debha-q6bhj7 , debha-q6bi97 , debha-q6biq7 , debha-q6bj53 , debha-q6bkd8 , debha-q6bks1 , debha-q6bky4 , debha-q6bm63 , debha-q6bmh3 , debha-q6bn89 , debha-q6bnj6 , debha-q6bp08 , debha-q6bpb4 , debha-q6bpc0 , debha-q6bpc6 , debha-q6bq10 , debha-q6bq11 , debha-q6bqd9 , debha-q6bqj6 , debha-q6br33 , debha-q6br93 , debha-q6brg1 , debha-q6brw7 , debha-q6bs23 , debha-q6bsc3 , debha-q6bsl8 , debha-q6bsx6 , debha-q6bta5 , debha-q6bty5 , debha-q6btz0 , debha-q6bu73 , debha-q6buk9 , debha-q6but7 , debha-q6bvc4 , debha-q6bvg4 , debha-q6bvg8 , debha-q6bvp4 , debha-q6bw82 , debha-q6bxr7 , debha-q6bxu9 , debha-q6bym5 , debha-q6byn7 , debha-q6bzj8 , debha-q6bzk2 , debha-q6bzm5 , klula-apth1 , klula-ppme1 , klula-q6cin9 , klula-q6ciu6 , klula-q6cj47 , klula-q6cjc8 , klula-q6cjq9 , klula-q6cjs1 , klula-q6cjv9 , klula-q6ckd7 , klula-q6ckk4 , klula-q6ckx4 , klula-q6cl20 , klula-q6clm1 , klula-q6cly8 , klula-q6clz7 , klula-q6cm48 , klula-q6cm49 , klula-q6cmt5 , klula-q6cn71 , klula-q6cnm1 , klula-q6cr74 , klula-q6cr90 , klula-q6crs0 , klula-q6crv8 , klula-q6crz9 , klula-q6cst8 , klula-q6csv8 , klula-q6ctp8 , klula-q6cu02 , klula-q6cu78 , klula-q6cu79 , klula-q6cuv3 , klula-q6cvd3 , klula-q6cw70 , klula-q6cw92 , klula-q6cwu7 , klula-q6cx84 , klula-q6cxa3 , klula-q6cy41 , yarli-apth1 , yarli-atg15 , yarli-BST1B , yarli-lip2 , yarli-LIP3 , yarli-LIP4 , yarli-LIP5 , yarli-LIP7 , yarli-LIP8 , yarli-lipa1 , yarli-ppme1 , yarli-q6bzp1 , yarli-q6bzv7 , yarli-q6c1f5 , yarli-q6c1f7 , yarli-q6c1r3 , yarli-q6c2z2 , yarli-q6c3h1 , yarli-q6c3i6 , yarli-q6c3l1 , yarli-q6c3u6 , yarli-q6c4h8 , yarli-q6c5j1 , yarli-q6c5m4 , yarli-q6c6m4 , yarli-q6c6p7 , yarli-q6c6v2 , yarli-q6c7h3 , yarli-q6c7i7 , yarli-q6c7j5 , yarli-q6c7y6 , yarli-q6c8m4 , yarli-q6c8q4 , yarli-q6c8u4 , yarli-q6c8y2 , yarli-q6c9r0 , yarli-q6c9r1 , yarli-q6c9u0 , yarli-q6c9v4 , yarli-q6c209 , yarli-q6c225 , yarli-q6c493 , yarli-q6c598 , yarli-q6c687 , yarli-q6c822 , yarli-q6cau6 , yarli-q6cax2 , yarli-q6caz1 , yarli-q6cb63 , yarli-q6cba7 , yarli-q6cbb1 , yarli-q6cbe6 , yarli-q6cby1 , yarli-q6ccr0 , yarli-q6cdg1 , yarli-q6cdi6 , yarli-q6cdv9 , yarli-q6ce37 , yarli-q6ceg0 , yarli-q6cep3 , yarli-q6cey5 , yarli-q6cf60 , yarli-q6cfp3 , yarli-q6cfx2 , yarli-q6cg13 , yarli-q6cg27 , yarli-q6cgj3 , yarli-q6chb8 , yarli-q6ci59 , yarli-q6c748 , canga-q6fpj0 , klula-q6cp11 , yarli-q6c4p0 , debha-q6btp5 , debha-kex1

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XV - Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
Author(s) : Dujon B , Albermann K , Aldea M , Alexandraki D , Ansorge W , Arino J , Benes V , Bohn C , Bolotin-Fukuhara M , Bordonne R , Boyer J , Camasses A , Casamayor A , Casas C , Cheret G , Cziepluch C , Daignan-Fornier B , Dang DV , de Haan M , Delius H , Durand P , Fairhead C , Feldmann H , Gaillon L , Galisson F , Gamo FJ , Gancedo C , Goffeau A , Goulding SE , Grivell LA , Habbig B , Hand NJ , Hani J , Hattenhorst U , Hebling U , Hernando Y , Herrero E , Heumann K , Hiesel R , Hilger F , Hofmann B , Hollenberg CP , Hughes B , Jauniaux JC , Kalogeropoulos A , Katsoulou C , Kordes E , Lafuente MJ , Landt O , Louis EJ , Maarse AC , Madania A , Mannhaupt G , Marck C , Martin RP , Mewes HW , Michaux G , Paces V , Parle-McDermott AG , Pearson BM , Perrin A , Pettersson B , Poch O , Pohl TM , Poirey R , Portetelle D , Pujol A , Purnelle B , Ramezani Rad M , Rechmann S , Schwager C , Schweizer M , Sor F , Sterky F , Tarassov IA , Teodoru C , Tettelin H , Thierry A , Tobiasch E , Tzermia M , Uhlen M , Unseld M , Valens M , Vandenbol M , Vetter I , Vlcek C , Voet M , Volckaert G , Voss H , Wambutt R , Wedler H , Wiemann S , Winsor B , Wolfe KH , Zollner A , Zumstein E , Kleine K
Ref : Nature , 387 :98 , 1997
Abstract : Chromosome XV was one of the last two chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be discovered. It is the third-largest yeast chromosome after chromosomes XII and IV, and is very similar in size to chromosome VII. It alone represents 9% of the yeast genome (8% if ribosomal DNA is included). When systematic sequencing of chromosome XV was started, 93 genes or markers were identified, and most of them were mapped. However, very little else was known about chromosome XV which, in contrast to shorter chromosomes, had not been the object of comprehensive genetic or molecular analysis. It was therefore decided to start sequencing chromosome XV only in the third phase of the European Yeast Genome Sequencing Programme, after experience was gained on chromosomes III, XI and II. The sequence of chromosome XV has been determined from a set of partly overlapping cosmid clones derived from a unique yeast strain, and physically mapped at 3.3-kilobase resolution before sequencing. As well as numerous new open reading frames (ORFs) and genes encoding tRNA or small RNA molecules, the sequence of 1,091,283 base pairs confirms the high proportion of orphan genes and reveals a number of ancestral and successive duplications with other yeast chromosomes.
ESTHER : Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
PubMedSearch : Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
PubMedID: 9169874
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-FSH3 , yeast-yo059

Title : Complete DNA sequence of yeast chromosome XI - Dujon_1994_Nature_369_371
Author(s) : Dujon B , Alexandraki D , Andre B , Ansorge W , Baladron V , Ballesta JP , Banrevi A , Bolle PA , Bolotin-Fukuhara M , Bossier P , Bou G , Boyer J , Bultrago MJ , Cheret G , Colleaux L , Dalgnan-Fornler B , del Rey F , Dlon C , Domdey H , Dsterhoft A , Dsterhus S , Entlan KD , Erfle H , Esteban PF , Feldmann H , Fernandes L , Robo GM , Fritz C , Fukuhara H , Gabel C , Gaillon L , Carcia-Cantalejo JM , Garcia-Ramirez JJ , Gent NE , Ghazvini M , Goffeau A , Gonzalez A , Grothues D , Guerreiro P , Hegemann J , Hewitt N , Hilger F , Hollenberg CP , Horaitis O , Indge KJ , Jacquier A , James CM , Jauniaux C , Jimenez A , Keuchel H , Kirchrath L , Kleine K , Ktter P , Legrain P , Liebl S , Louis EJ , Maia e Silva A , Marck C , Monnier AL , Mostl D , Mller S , Obermaier B , Oliver SG , Pallier C , Pascolo S , Pfeiffer F , Philippsen P , Planta RJ , Pohl FM , Pohl TM , Pohlmann R , Portetelle D , Purnelle B , Puzos V , Ramezani Rad M , Rasmussen SW , Remacha M , Revuelta JL , Richard GF , Rieger M , Rodrigues-Pousada C , Rose M , Rupp T , Santos MA , Schwager C , Sensen C , Skala J , Soares H , Sor F , Stegemann J , Tettelin H , Thierry A , Tzermia M , Urrestarazu LA , van Dyck L , Van Vliet-Reedijk JC , Valens M , Vandenbo M , Vilela C , Vissers S , von Wettstein D , Voss H , Wiemann S , Xu G , Zimmermann J , Haasemann M , Becker I , Mewes HW
Ref : Nature , 369 :371 , 1994
Abstract : The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XI has been determined. In addition to a compact arrangement of potential protein coding sequences, the 666,448-base-pair sequence has revealed general chromosome patterns; in particular, alternating regional variations in average base composition correlate with variations in local gene density along the chromosome. Significant discrepancies with the previously published genetic map demonstrate the need for using independent physical mapping criteria.
ESTHER : Dujon_1994_Nature_369_371
PubMedSearch : Dujon_1994_Nature_369_371
PubMedID: 8196765
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-mgll

Title : Inhibition of cholinesterases by histamine 2 receptor antagonist drugs - Laine-Cessac_1993_Res.Comm.Chem.Pathol.Pharmacol_79_185
Author(s) : Laine-Cessac P , Turcant A , Premel-Cabic A , Boyer J , Allain P
Ref : Research Communications in Chemical Pathology & Pharmacology , 79 :185 , 1993
Abstract : Many studies have demonstrated that histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) have in vitro anticholinesterase effects, but discrepancies about type and potency of this inhibitory effect exist among published results. Moreover, cholinesterase inhibition has not been shown in patients receiving H2RA. These discrepancies led us to study the in vitro antibutyryl- and in vitro antiacetylcholinesterase activities of ranitidine, cimetidine, nizatidine comparatively to pyridostigmines. Plasma cholinesterase activity (PCEA), erythrocyte cholinesterase activity (ECEA) and plasma ranitidine levels were measured in six patients before and during continuous IV infusion (150 or 200 mg/d) of ranitidine. Our in vitro results confirm the weak anticholinesterase activity of H2RA. Ranitidine is the most potent inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase (Ki = 61 microM). Ranitidine and nizatidine are the most potent inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (Ki' = 2.1 microM, Ki' = 5.1 microM, respectively) but one thousand times less effective than pyridostigmine (Ki = 0.003 microM). The results in patients show no statistically significant difference between PCEA and ECEA measured before and during ranitidine infusion (plasma ranitidine levels between 0.31 and 1.25 microM).
ESTHER : Laine-Cessac_1993_Res.Comm.Chem.Pathol.Pharmacol_79_185
PubMedSearch : Laine-Cessac_1993_Res.Comm.Chem.Pathol.Pharmacol_79_185
PubMedID: 8095733