Bornberg-Bauer E

References (8)

Title : Ant behaviour and brain gene expression of defending hosts depend on the ecological success of the intruding social parasite - Kaur_2019_Philos.Trans.R.Soc.Lond.B.Biol.Sci_374_20180192
Author(s) : Kaur R , Stoldt M , Jongepier E , Feldmeyer B , Menzel F , Bornberg-Bauer E , Foitzik S
Ref : Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci , 374 :20180192 , 2019
Abstract : The geographical mosaic theory of coevolution predicts that species interactions vary between locales. Depending on who leads the coevolutionary arms race, the effectivity of parasite attack or host defence strategies will explain parasite prevalence. Here, we compare behaviour and brain transcriptomes of Temnothorax longispinosus ant workers when defending their nest against an invading social parasite, the slavemaking ant Temnothorax americanus. A full-factorial design allowed us to test whether behaviour and gene expression are linked to parasite pressure on host populations or to the ecological success of parasite populations. Albeit host defences had been shown before to covary with local parasite pressure, we found parasite success to be much more important. Our chemical and behavioural analyses revealed that parasites from high prevalence sites carry lower concentrations of recognition cues and are less often attacked by hosts. This link was further supported by gene expression analysis. Our study reveals that host-parasite interactions are strongly influenced by social parasite strategies, so that variation in parasite prevalence is determined by parasite traits rather than the efficacy of host defence. Gene functions associated with parasite success indicated strong neuronal responses in hosts, including long-term changes in gene regulation, indicating an enduring impact of parasites on host behaviour. This article is part of the theme issue 'The coevolutionary biology of brood parasitism: from mechanism to pattern'.
ESTHER : Kaur_2019_Philos.Trans.R.Soc.Lond.B.Biol.Sci_374_20180192
PubMedSearch : Kaur_2019_Philos.Trans.R.Soc.Lond.B.Biol.Sci_374_20180192
PubMedID: 30967075
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9hyme-a0a4s2kts7

Title : Hemimetabolous genomes reveal molecular basis of termite eusociality - Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
Author(s) : Harrison MC , Jongepier E , Robertson HM , Arning N , Bitard-Feildel T , Chao H , Childers CP , Dinh H , Doddapaneni H , Dugan S , Gowin J , Greiner C , Han Y , Hu H , Hughes DST , Huylmans AK , Kemena C , Kremer LPM , Lee SL , Lopez-Ezquerra A , Mallet L , Monroy-Kuhn JM , Moser A , Murali SC , Muzny DM , Otani S , Piulachs MD , Poelchau M , Qu J , Schaub F , Wada-Katsumata A , Worley KC , Xie Q , Ylla G , Poulsen M , Gibbs RA , Schal C , Richards S , Belles X , Korb J , Bornberg-Bauer E
Ref : Nat Ecol Evol , 2 :557 , 2018
Abstract : Around 150 million years ago, eusocial termites evolved from within the cockroaches, 50 million years before eusocial Hymenoptera, such as bees and ants, appeared. Here, we report the 2-Gb genome of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, and the 1.3-Gb genome of the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus. We show evolutionary signatures of termite eusociality by comparing the genomes and transcriptomes of three termites and the cockroach against the background of 16 other eusocial and non-eusocial insects. Dramatic adaptive changes in genes underlying the production and perception of pheromones confirm the importance of chemical communication in the termites. These are accompanied by major changes in gene regulation and the molecular evolution of caste determination. Many of these results parallel molecular mechanisms of eusocial evolution in Hymenoptera. However, the specific solutions are remarkably different, thus revealing a striking case of convergence in one of the major evolutionary transitions in biological complexity.
ESTHER : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedSearch : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedID: 29403074
Gene_locus related to this paper: blage-a0a2p8y5s3 , blage-a0a2p8yjf8.2 , blage-a0a2p8xjb6

Title : The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea - Olsen_2016_Nature_530_331
Author(s) : Olsen JL , Rouze P , Verhelst B , Lin YC , Bayer T , Collen J , Dattolo E , De Paoli E , Dittami S , Maumus F , Michel G , Kersting A , Lauritano C , Lohaus R , Topel M , Tonon T , Vanneste K , Amirebrahimi M , Brakel J , Bostrom C , Chovatia M , Grimwood J , Jenkins JW , Jueterbock A , Mraz A , Stam WT , Tice H , Bornberg-Bauer E , Green PJ , Pearson GA , Procaccini G , Duarte CM , Schmutz J , Reusch TB , Van de Peer Y
Ref : Nature , 530 :331 , 2016
Abstract : Seagrasses colonized the sea on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever accomplished by flowering plants. Key angiosperm innovations that were lost include the entire repertoire of stomatal genes, genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoids and ethylene signalling, and genes for ultraviolet protection and phytochromes for far-red sensing. Seagrasses have also regained functions enabling them to adjust to full salinity. Their cell walls contain all of the polysaccharides typical of land plants, but also contain polyanionic, low-methylated pectins and sulfated galactans, a feature shared with the cell walls of all macroalgae and that is important for ion homoeostasis, nutrient uptake and O2/CO2 exchange through leaf epidermal cells. The Z. marina genome resource will markedly advance a wide range of functional ecological studies from adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming, to unravelling the mechanisms of osmoregulation under high salinities that may further inform our understanding of the evolution of salt tolerance in crop plants.
ESTHER : Olsen_2016_Nature_530_331
PubMedSearch : Olsen_2016_Nature_530_331
PubMedID: 26814964
Gene_locus related to this paper: zosmr-a0a0k9p2z2 , zosmr-a0a0k9q3d3 , zosmr-a0a0k9nzq4 , zosmr-a0a0k9pcd8 , zosmr-a0a0k9p120 , zosmr-a0a0k9npe9

Title : The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization - Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
Author(s) : Sadd BM , Barribeau SM , Bloch G , de Graaf DC , Dearden P , Elsik CG , Gadau J , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Hasselmann M , Lozier JD , Robertson HM , Smagghe G , Stolle E , Van Vaerenbergh M , Waterhouse RM , Bornberg-Bauer E , Klasberg S , Bennett AK , Camara F , Guigo R , Hoff K , Mariotti M , Munoz-Torres M , Murphy T , Santesmasses D , Amdam GV , Beckers M , Beye M , Biewer M , Bitondi MM , Blaxter ML , Bourke AF , Brown MJ , Buechel SD , Cameron R , Cappelle K , Carolan JC , Christiaens O , Ciborowski KL , Clarke DF , Colgan TJ , Collins DH , Cridge AG , Dalmay T , Dreier S , du Plessis L , Duncan E , Erler S , Evans J , Falcon T , Flores K , Freitas FC , Fuchikawa T , Gempe T , Hartfelder K , Hauser F , Helbing S , Humann FC , Irvine F , Jermiin LS , Johnson CE , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Kadowaki T , Kidner JH , Koch V , Kohler A , Kraus FB , Lattorff HM , Leask M , Lockett GA , Mallon EB , Antonio DS , Marxer M , Meeus I , Moritz RF , Nair A , Napflin K , Nissen I , Niu J , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Osborne A , Otte M , Pinheiro DG , Rossie N , Rueppell O , Santos CG , Schmid-Hempel R , Schmitt BD , Schulte C , Simoes ZL , Soares MP , Swevers L , Winnebeck EC , Wolschin F , Yu N , Zdobnov EM , Aqrawi PK , Blankenburg KP , Coyle M , Francisco L , Hernandez AG , Holder M , Hudson ME , Jackson L , Jayaseelan J , Joshi V , Kovar C , Lee SL , Mata R , Mathew T , Newsham IF , Ngo R , Okwuonu G , Pham C , Pu LL , Saada N , Santibanez J , Simmons D , Thornton R , Venkat A , Walden KK , Wu YQ , Debyser G , Devreese B , Asher C , Blommaert J , Chipman AD , Chittka L , Fouks B , Liu J , O'Neill MP , Sumner S , Puiu D , Qu J , Salzberg SL , Scherer SE , Muzny DM , Richards S , Robinson GE , Gibbs RA , Schmid-Hempel P , Worley KC
Ref : Genome Biol , 16 :76 , 2015
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats.
RESULTS: We report the high quality draft genome sequences of Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens, two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome features thought to underpin advanced eusociality are also present in bumblebees, indicating an earlier evolution in the bee lineage. Xenobiotic detoxification and immune genes are similarly depauperate in bumblebees and honeybees, and multiple categories of genes linked to social organization, including development and behavior, show high conservation. Key differences identified include a bias in bumblebee chemoreception towards gustation from olfaction, and striking differences in microRNAs, potentially responsible for gene regulation underlying social and other traits.
CONCLUSIONS: These two bumblebee genomes provide a foundation for post-genomic research on these key pollinators and insect societies. Overall, gene repertoires suggest that the route to advanced eusociality in bees was mediated by many small changes in many genes and processes, and not by notable expansion or depauperation.
ESTHER : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedSearch : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedID: 25908251

Title : The genome of Eucalyptus grandis - Myburg_2014_Nature_510_356
Author(s) : Myburg AA , Grattapaglia D , Tuskan GA , Hellsten U , Hayes RD , Grimwood J , Jenkins J , Lindquist E , Tice H , Bauer D , Goodstein DM , Dubchak I , Poliakov A , Mizrachi E , Kullan AR , Hussey SG , Pinard D , van der Merwe K , Singh P , van Jaarsveld I , Silva-Junior OB , Togawa RC , Pappas MR , Faria DA , Sansaloni CP , Petroli CD , Yang X , Ranjan P , Tschaplinski TJ , Ye CY , Li T , Sterck L , Vanneste K , Murat F , Soler M , Clemente HS , Saidi N , Cassan-Wang H , Dunand C , Hefer CA , Bornberg-Bauer E , Kersting AR , Vining K , Amarasinghe V , Ranik M , Naithani S , Elser J , Boyd AE , Liston A , Spatafora JW , Dharmwardhana P , Raja R , Sullivan C , Romanel E , Alves-Ferreira M , Kulheim C , Foley W , Carocha V , Paiva J , Kudrna D , Brommonschenkel SH , Pasquali G , Byrne M , Rigault P , Tibbits J , Spokevicius A , Jones RC , Steane DA , Vaillancourt RE , Potts BM , Joubert F , Barry K , Pappas GJ , Strauss SH , Jaiswal P , Grima-Pettenati J , Salse J , Van de Peer Y , Rokhsar DS , Schmutz J
Ref : Nature , 510 :356 , 2014
Abstract : Eucalypts are the world's most widely planted hardwood trees. Their outstanding diversity, adaptability and growth have made them a global renewable resource of fibre and energy. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640-megabase genome of Eucalyptus grandis. Of 36,376 predicted protein-coding genes, 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion thus far in plant genomes. Eucalyptus also shows the highest diversity of genes for specialized metabolites such as terpenes that act as chemical defence and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Genome sequencing of the E. grandis sister species E. globulus and a set of inbred E. grandis tree genomes reveals dynamic genome evolution and hotspots of inbreeding depression. The E. grandis genome is the first reference for the eudicot order Myrtales and is placed here sister to the eurosids. This resource expands our understanding of the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology.
ESTHER : Myburg_2014_Nature_510_356
PubMedSearch : Myburg_2014_Nature_510_356
PubMedID: 24919147
Gene_locus related to this paper: eucgr-a0a059d0n8 , eucgr-a0a059cm68 , eucgr-a0a059d783 , eucgr-a0a059af93 , eucgr-a0a059awi0 , eucgr-a0a059awt4 , eucgr-a0a059ar83 , eucgr-a0a059ayw5 , eucgr-a0a059az75 , eucgr-a0a059azj1 , eucgr-a0a059azq5 , eucgr-a0a059bkm2 , eucgr-a0a059bl38 , eucgr-a0a059a7m2 , eucgr-a0a059a6p6 , eucgr-a0a059a6p1 , eucgr-a0a059a5e9 , eucgr-a0a059cpq4 , eucgr-a0a059b8v5

Title : Molecular traces of alternative social organization in a termite genome - Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
Author(s) : Terrapon N , Li C , Robertson HM , Ji L , Meng X , Booth W , Chen Z , Childers CP , Glastad KM , Gokhale K , Gowin J , Gronenberg W , Hermansen RA , Hu H , Hunt BG , Huylmans AK , Khalil SM , Mitchell RD , Munoz-Torres MC , Mustard JA , Pan H , Reese JT , Scharf ME , Sun F , Vogel H , Xiao J , Yang W , Yang Z , Zhou J , Zhu J , Brent CS , Elsik CG , Goodisman MA , Liberles DA , Roe RM , Vargo EL , Vilcinskas A , Wang J , Bornberg-Bauer E , Korb J , Zhang G , Liebig J
Ref : Nat Commun , 5 :3636 , 2014
Abstract : Although eusociality evolved independently within several orders of insects, research into the molecular underpinnings of the transition towards social complexity has been confined primarily to Hymenoptera (for example, ants and bees). Here we sequence the genome and stage-specific transcriptomes of the dampwood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis (Blattodea) and compare them with similar data for eusocial Hymenoptera, to better identify commonalities and differences in achieving this significant transition. We show an expansion of genes related to male fertility, with upregulated gene expression in male reproductive individuals reflecting the profound differences in mating biology relative to the Hymenoptera. For several chemoreceptor families, we show divergent numbers of genes, which may correspond to the more claustral lifestyle of these termites. We also show similarities in the number and expression of genes related to caste determination mechanisms. Finally, patterns of DNA methylation and alternative splicing support a hypothesized epigenetic regulation of caste differentiation.
ESTHER : Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
PubMedSearch : Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
PubMedID: 24845553
Gene_locus related to this paper: zoone-a0a067r283 , zoone-a0a067qst6 , zoone-a0a067rbc7 , zoone-a0a067qz43 , zoone-a0a067qn94 , zoone-a0a067rbw9 , zoone-a0a067qx93 , zoone-a0a067rcf4 , zoone-a0a067r8q8 , zoone-a0a067rh81 , zoone-a0a067r506 , zoone-a0a067qxd4 , zoone-a0a067qy86 , zoone-a0a067qsw2 , zoone-a0a067qfp9 , zoone-a0a067ru91 , zoone-a0a067rwu7 , zoone-a0a067rmu8 , zoone-a0a067r773 , zoone-a0a067qlt8 , zoone-a0a067qhm6 , zoone-a0a067qjz2 , zoone-a0a067qs20 , zoone-a0a067rmu4 , zoone-a0a067qty7 , zoone-a0a067rk35 , zoone-a0a067rk64 , zoone-a0a067rj74 , zoone-a0a067rp97 , zoone-a0a067rjm1

Title : The genome sequence of the leaf-cutter ant Atta cephalotes reveals insights into its obligate symbiotic lifestyle - Suen_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002007
Author(s) : Suen G , Teiling C , Li L , Holt C , Abouheif E , Bornberg-Bauer E , Bouffard P , Caldera EJ , Cash E , Cavanaugh A , Denas O , Elhaik E , Fave MJ , Gadau J , Gibson JD , Graur D , Grubbs KJ , Hagen DE , Harkins TT , Helmkampf M , Hu H , Johnson BR , Kim J , Marsh SE , Moeller JA , Munoz-Torres MC , Murphy MC , Naughton MC , Nigam S , Overson R , Rajakumar R , Reese JT , Scott JJ , Smith CR , Tao S , Tsutsui ND , Viljakainen L , Wissler L , Yandell MD , Zimmer F , Taylor J , Slater SC , Clifton SW , Warren WC , Elsik CG , Smith CD , Weinstock GM , Gerardo NM , Currie CR
Ref : PLoS Genet , 7 :e1002007 , 2011
Abstract : Leaf-cutter ants are one of the most important herbivorous insects in the Neotropics, harvesting vast quantities of fresh leaf material. The ants use leaves to cultivate a fungus that serves as the colony's primary food source. This obligate ant-fungus mutualism is one of the few occurrences of farming by non-humans and likely facilitated the formation of their massive colonies. Mature leaf-cutter ant colonies contain millions of workers ranging in size from small garden tenders to large soldiers, resulting in one of the most complex polymorphic caste systems within ants. To begin uncovering the genomic underpinnings of this system, we sequenced the genome of Atta cephalotes using 454 pyrosequencing. One prediction from this ant's lifestyle is that it has undergone genetic modifications that reflect its obligate dependence on the fungus for nutrients. Analysis of this genome sequence is consistent with this hypothesis, as we find evidence for reductions in genes related to nutrient acquisition. These include extensive reductions in serine proteases (which are likely unnecessary because proteolysis is not a primary mechanism used to process nutrients obtained from the fungus), a loss of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis (suggesting that this amino acid is obtained from the fungus), and the absence of a hexamerin (which sequesters amino acids during larval development in other insects). Following recent reports of genome sequences from other insects that engage in symbioses with beneficial microbes, the A. cephalotes genome provides new insights into the symbiotic lifestyle of this ant and advances our understanding of host-microbe symbioses.
ESTHER : Suen_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002007
PubMedSearch : Suen_2011_PLoS.Genet_7_e1002007
PubMedID: 21347285
Gene_locus related to this paper: acrec-f4w848 , acrec-f4wah1 , acrec-f4wai9 , acrec-f4wda7 , acrec-f4wfh7 , acrec-f4wk54 , acrec-f4wng2 , acrec-f4wpb7 , acrec-f4wpb8 , acrec-f4wpb9 , acrec-f4x2j7 , acrec-f4x3l5 , acrec-f4x6y6 , acrec-f4x7w5 , acrec-f4x7w6 , acrec-f4x378 , acrec-f4x808 , attce-h9hc46 , solin-e9ige7 , attce-w4wts9 , attce-w4x506 , attce-w4vya2 , attce-w4vyi5 , attce-w4wib4 , attce-w4wkj3 , attce-w4x3s7 , attce-w4x3u4 , attce-w4wu92 , attce-w4w1m9 , attce-w4x2m8 , attce-w4w776 , attce-w4x1t1 , attce-a0a158nl98 , attce-a0a158nmi0 , attce-a0a158nqx5 , attce-a0a158nr47.2 , attce-a0a158ns84 , attce-a0a158nvq4 , attce-a0a158nij4 , attce-a0a158nhg2 , attce-a0a158nhn7 , attce-a0a158nbh6 , attce-a0a158ne04 , attce-a0a158nyf0

Title : Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species - Werren_2010_Science_327_343
Author(s) : Werren JH , Richards S , Desjardins CA , Niehuis O , Gadau J , Colbourne JK , Beukeboom LW , Desplan C , Elsik CG , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Kitts P , Lynch JA , Murphy T , Oliveira DC , Smith CD , van de Zande L , Worley KC , Zdobnov EM , Aerts M , Albert S , Anaya VH , Anzola JM , Barchuk AR , Behura SK , Bera AN , Berenbaum MR , Bertossa RC , Bitondi MM , Bordenstein SR , Bork P , Bornberg-Bauer E , Brunain M , Cazzamali G , Chaboub L , Chacko J , Chavez D , Childers CP , Choi JH , Clark ME , Claudianos C , Clinton RA , Cree AG , Cristino AS , Dang PM , Darby AC , de Graaf DC , Devreese B , Dinh HH , Edwards R , Elango N , Elhaik E , Ermolaeva O , Evans JD , Foret S , Fowler GR , Gerlach D , Gibson JD , Gilbert DG , Graur D , Grunder S , Hagen DE , Han Y , Hauser F , Hultmark D , Hunter HCt , Hurst GD , Jhangian SN , Jiang H , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Junier T , Kadowaki T , Kamping A , Kapustin Y , Kechavarzi B , Kim J , Kiryutin B , Koevoets T , Kovar CL , Kriventseva EV , Kucharski R , Lee H , Lee SL , Lees K , Lewis LR , Loehlin DW , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Lopez JA , Lozado RJ , Maglott D , Maleszka R , Mayampurath A , Mazur DJ , McClure MA , Moore AD , Morgan MB , Muller J , Munoz-Torres MC , Muzny DM , Nazareth LV , Neupert S , Nguyen NB , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Okwuonu GO , Pannebakker BA , Pejaver VR , Peng Z , Pratt SC , Predel R , Pu LL , Ranson H , Raychoudhury R , Rechtsteiner A , Reese JT , Reid JG , Riddle M , Robertson HM , Romero-Severson J , Rosenberg M , Sackton TB , Sattelle DB , Schluns H , Schmitt T , Schneider M , Schuler A , Schurko AM , Shuker DM , Simoes ZL , Sinha S , Smith Z , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Springauf A , Stafflinger E , Stage DE , Stanke M , Tanaka Y , Telschow A , Trent C , Vattathil S , Verhulst EC , Viljakainen L , Wanner KW , Waterhouse RM , Whitfield JB , Wilkes TE , Williamson MS , Willis JH , Wolschin F , Wyder S , Yamada T , Yi SV , Zecher CN , Zhang L , Gibbs RA , Williamson M
Ref : Science , 327 :343 , 2010
Abstract : We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging genetic model, particularly for evolutionary and developmental genetics. Key findings include the identification of a functional DNA methylation tool kit; hymenopteran-specific genes including diverse venoms; lateral gene transfers among Pox viruses, Wolbachia, and Nasonia; and the rapid evolution of genes involved in nuclear-mitochondrial interactions that are implicated in speciation. Newly developed genome resources advance Nasonia for genetic research, accelerate mapping and cloning of quantitative trait loci, and will ultimately provide tools and knowledge for further increasing the utility of parasitoids as pest insect-control agents.
ESTHER : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedSearch : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedID: 20075255
Gene_locus related to this paper: nasvi-ACHE1 , nasvi-ACHE2 , nasvi-k7in31 , nasvi-k7iwl9 , nasvi-k7iyk8 , nasvi-k7jlv1 , nasvi-k7in32 , nasvi-k7ind2 , nasvi-k7inh0 , nasvi-k7inh1 , nasvi-k7inh2 , nasvi-k7inp9 , nasvi-k7iun7 , nasvi-k7iv21 , nasvi-k7ivn5 , nasvi-k7ivn6 , nasvi-k7iw29 , nasvi-k7iwk5 , nasvi-k7iwl8 , nasvi-k7iz24 , nasvi-k7izb4 , nasvi-k7j5u6 , nasvi-k7j6y1 , nasvi-k7j6y2 , nasvi-k7j6y4 , nasvi-k7j718 , nasvi-k7j755 , nasvi-k7j756 , nasvi-k7j757 , nasvi-k7j7k5 , nasvi-k7j7n7 , nasvi-k7j7r8 , nasvi-k7j7s8 , nasvi-k7j7s9 , nasvi-k7j811 , nasvi-k7iny8 , nasvi-k7izf2 , nasvi-k7iwe2 , nasvi-k7j6w4 , nasvi-k7izl9 , nasvi-k7jf39 , nasvi-k7izl8 , nasvi-k7irf1 , nasvi-k7j7l1