Robertson HM

References (11)

Title : Hemimetabolous genomes reveal molecular basis of termite eusociality - Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
Author(s) : Harrison MC , Jongepier E , Robertson HM , Arning N , Bitard-Feildel T , Chao H , Childers CP , Dinh H , Doddapaneni H , Dugan S , Gowin J , Greiner C , Han Y , Hu H , Hughes DST , Huylmans AK , Kemena C , Kremer LPM , Lee SL , Lopez-Ezquerra A , Mallet L , Monroy-Kuhn JM , Moser A , Murali SC , Muzny DM , Otani S , Piulachs MD , Poelchau M , Qu J , Schaub F , Wada-Katsumata A , Worley KC , Xie Q , Ylla G , Poulsen M , Gibbs RA , Schal C , Richards S , Belles X , Korb J , Bornberg-Bauer E
Ref : Nat Ecol Evol , 2 :557 , 2018
Abstract : Around 150 million years ago, eusocial termites evolved from within the cockroaches, 50 million years before eusocial Hymenoptera, such as bees and ants, appeared. Here, we report the 2-Gb genome of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, and the 1.3-Gb genome of the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus. We show evolutionary signatures of termite eusociality by comparing the genomes and transcriptomes of three termites and the cockroach against the background of 16 other eusocial and non-eusocial insects. Dramatic adaptive changes in genes underlying the production and perception of pheromones confirm the importance of chemical communication in the termites. These are accompanied by major changes in gene regulation and the molecular evolution of caste determination. Many of these results parallel molecular mechanisms of eusocial evolution in Hymenoptera. However, the specific solutions are remarkably different, thus revealing a striking case of convergence in one of the major evolutionary transitions in biological complexity.
ESTHER : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedSearch : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedID: 29403074
Gene_locus related to this paper: blage-a0a2p8y5s3 , blage-a0a2p8yjf8.2 , blage-a0a2p8xjb6

Title : Quantitative trait locus mapping and functional genomics of an organophosphate resistance trait in the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera - Coates_2016_Insect.Mol.Biol_25_1
Author(s) : Coates BS , Alves AP , Wang H , Zhou X , Nowatzki T , Chen H , Rangasamy M , Robertson HM , Whitfield CW , Walden KK , Kachman SD , French BW , Meinke LJ , Hawthorne D , Abel CA , Sappington TW , Siegfried BD , Miller NJ
Ref : Insect Molecular Biology , 25 :1 , 2016
Abstract : The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is an insect pest of corn and population suppression with chemical insecticides is an important management tool. Traits conferring organophosphate insecticide resistance have increased in frequency amongst D. v. virgifera populations, resulting in the reduced efficacy in many corn-growing regions of the USA. We used comparative functional genomic and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping approaches to investigate the genetic basis of D. v. virgifera resistance to the organophosphate methyl-parathion. RNA from adult methyl-parathion resistant and susceptible adults was hybridized to 8331 microarray probes. The results predicted that 11 transcripts were significantly up-regulated in resistant phenotypes, with the most significant (fold increases >/= 2.43) being an alpha-esterase-like transcript. Differential expression was validated only for the alpha-esterase (ST020027A20C03), with 11- to 13-fold greater expression in methyl-parathion resistant adults (P < 0.05). Progeny with a segregating methyl-parathion resistance trait were obtained from a reciprocal backcross design. QTL analyses of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotype data predicted involvement of a single genome interval. These data suggest that a specific carboyxesterase may function in field-evolved corn rootworm resistance to organophosphates, even though direct linkage between the QTL and this locus could not be established.
ESTHER : Coates_2016_Insect.Mol.Biol_25_1
PubMedSearch : Coates_2016_Insect.Mol.Biol_25_1
PubMedID: 26566705
Gene_locus related to this paper: diavi-a0a0s2sw77 , diavi-a0a0s2swc2

Title : The whole genome sequence of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), reveals insights into the biology and adaptive evolution of a highly invasive pest species - Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
Author(s) : Papanicolaou A , Schetelig MF , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Benoit JB , Bourtzis K , Castanera P , Cavanaugh JP , Chao H , Childers C , Curril I , Dinh H , Doddapaneni H , Dolan A , Dugan S , Friedrich M , Gasperi G , Geib S , Georgakilas G , Gibbs RA , Giers SD , Gomulski LM , Gonzalez-Guzman M , Guillem-Amat A , Han Y , Hatzigeorgiou AG , Hernandez-Crespo P , Hughes DS , Jones JW , Karagkouni D , Koskinioti P , Lee SL , Malacrida AR , Manni M , Mathiopoulos K , Meccariello A , Murali SC , Murphy TD , Muzny DM , Oberhofer G , Ortego F , Paraskevopoulou MD , Poelchau M , Qu J , Reczko M , Robertson HM , Rosendale AJ , Rosselot AE , Saccone G , Salvemini M , Savini G , Schreiner P , Scolari F , Siciliano P , Sim SB , Tsiamis G , Urena E , Vlachos IS , Werren JH , Wimmer EA , Worley KC , Zacharopoulou A , Richards S , Handler AM
Ref : Genome Biol , 17 :192 , 2016
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a major destructive insect pest due to its broad host range, which includes hundreds of fruits and vegetables. It exhibits a unique ability to invade and adapt to ecological niches throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, though medfly infestations have been prevented and controlled by the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of integrated pest management programs (IPMs). The genetic analysis and manipulation of medfly has been subject to intensive study in an effort to improve SIT efficacy and other aspects of IPM control.
RESULTS: The 479 Mb medfly genome is sequenced from adult flies from lines inbred for 20 generations. A high-quality assembly is achieved having a contig N50 of 45.7 kb and scaffold N50 of 4.06 Mb. In-depth curation of more than 1800 messenger RNAs shows specific gene expansions that can be related to invasiveness and host adaptation, including gene families for chemoreception, toxin and insecticide metabolism, cuticle proteins, opsins, and aquaporins. We identify genes relevant to IPM control, including those required to improve SIT.
CONCLUSIONS: The medfly genome sequence provides critical insights into the biology of one of the most serious and widespread agricultural pests. This knowledge should significantly advance the means of controlling the size and invasive potential of medfly populations. Its close relationship to Drosophila, and other insect species important to agriculture and human health, will further comparative functional and structural studies of insect genomes that should broaden our understanding of gene family evolution.
ESTHER : Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
PubMedSearch : Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
PubMedID: 27659211

Title : The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization - Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
Author(s) : Sadd BM , Barribeau SM , Bloch G , de Graaf DC , Dearden P , Elsik CG , Gadau J , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Hasselmann M , Lozier JD , Robertson HM , Smagghe G , Stolle E , Van Vaerenbergh M , Waterhouse RM , Bornberg-Bauer E , Klasberg S , Bennett AK , Camara F , Guigo R , Hoff K , Mariotti M , Munoz-Torres M , Murphy T , Santesmasses D , Amdam GV , Beckers M , Beye M , Biewer M , Bitondi MM , Blaxter ML , Bourke AF , Brown MJ , Buechel SD , Cameron R , Cappelle K , Carolan JC , Christiaens O , Ciborowski KL , Clarke DF , Colgan TJ , Collins DH , Cridge AG , Dalmay T , Dreier S , du Plessis L , Duncan E , Erler S , Evans J , Falcon T , Flores K , Freitas FC , Fuchikawa T , Gempe T , Hartfelder K , Hauser F , Helbing S , Humann FC , Irvine F , Jermiin LS , Johnson CE , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Kadowaki T , Kidner JH , Koch V , Kohler A , Kraus FB , Lattorff HM , Leask M , Lockett GA , Mallon EB , Antonio DS , Marxer M , Meeus I , Moritz RF , Nair A , Napflin K , Nissen I , Niu J , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Osborne A , Otte M , Pinheiro DG , Rossie N , Rueppell O , Santos CG , Schmid-Hempel R , Schmitt BD , Schulte C , Simoes ZL , Soares MP , Swevers L , Winnebeck EC , Wolschin F , Yu N , Zdobnov EM , Aqrawi PK , Blankenburg KP , Coyle M , Francisco L , Hernandez AG , Holder M , Hudson ME , Jackson L , Jayaseelan J , Joshi V , Kovar C , Lee SL , Mata R , Mathew T , Newsham IF , Ngo R , Okwuonu G , Pham C , Pu LL , Saada N , Santibanez J , Simmons D , Thornton R , Venkat A , Walden KK , Wu YQ , Debyser G , Devreese B , Asher C , Blommaert J , Chipman AD , Chittka L , Fouks B , Liu J , O'Neill MP , Sumner S , Puiu D , Qu J , Salzberg SL , Scherer SE , Muzny DM , Richards S , Robinson GE , Gibbs RA , Schmid-Hempel P , Worley KC
Ref : Genome Biol , 16 :76 , 2015
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats.
RESULTS: We report the high quality draft genome sequences of Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens, two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome features thought to underpin advanced eusociality are also present in bumblebees, indicating an earlier evolution in the bee lineage. Xenobiotic detoxification and immune genes are similarly depauperate in bumblebees and honeybees, and multiple categories of genes linked to social organization, including development and behavior, show high conservation. Key differences identified include a bias in bumblebee chemoreception towards gustation from olfaction, and striking differences in microRNAs, potentially responsible for gene regulation underlying social and other traits.
CONCLUSIONS: These two bumblebee genomes provide a foundation for post-genomic research on these key pollinators and insect societies. Overall, gene repertoires suggest that the route to advanced eusociality in bees was mediated by many small changes in many genes and processes, and not by notable expansion or depauperation.
ESTHER : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedSearch : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedID: 25908251

Title : Molecular traces of alternative social organization in a termite genome - Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
Author(s) : Terrapon N , Li C , Robertson HM , Ji L , Meng X , Booth W , Chen Z , Childers CP , Glastad KM , Gokhale K , Gowin J , Gronenberg W , Hermansen RA , Hu H , Hunt BG , Huylmans AK , Khalil SM , Mitchell RD , Munoz-Torres MC , Mustard JA , Pan H , Reese JT , Scharf ME , Sun F , Vogel H , Xiao J , Yang W , Yang Z , Zhou J , Zhu J , Brent CS , Elsik CG , Goodisman MA , Liberles DA , Roe RM , Vargo EL , Vilcinskas A , Wang J , Bornberg-Bauer E , Korb J , Zhang G , Liebig J
Ref : Nat Commun , 5 :3636 , 2014
Abstract : Although eusociality evolved independently within several orders of insects, research into the molecular underpinnings of the transition towards social complexity has been confined primarily to Hymenoptera (for example, ants and bees). Here we sequence the genome and stage-specific transcriptomes of the dampwood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis (Blattodea) and compare them with similar data for eusocial Hymenoptera, to better identify commonalities and differences in achieving this significant transition. We show an expansion of genes related to male fertility, with upregulated gene expression in male reproductive individuals reflecting the profound differences in mating biology relative to the Hymenoptera. For several chemoreceptor families, we show divergent numbers of genes, which may correspond to the more claustral lifestyle of these termites. We also show similarities in the number and expression of genes related to caste determination mechanisms. Finally, patterns of DNA methylation and alternative splicing support a hypothesized epigenetic regulation of caste differentiation.
ESTHER : Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
PubMedSearch : Terrapon_2014_Nat.Commun_5_3636
PubMedID: 24845553
Gene_locus related to this paper: zoone-a0a067r283 , zoone-a0a067qst6 , zoone-a0a067rbc7 , zoone-a0a067qz43 , zoone-a0a067qn94 , zoone-a0a067rbw9 , zoone-a0a067qx93 , zoone-a0a067rcf4 , zoone-a0a067r8q8 , zoone-a0a067rh81 , zoone-a0a067r506 , zoone-a0a067qxd4 , zoone-a0a067qy86 , zoone-a0a067qsw2 , zoone-a0a067qfp9 , zoone-a0a067ru91 , zoone-a0a067rwu7 , zoone-a0a067rmu8 , zoone-a0a067r773 , zoone-a0a067qlt8 , zoone-a0a067qhm6 , zoone-a0a067qjz2 , zoone-a0a067qs20 , zoone-a0a067rmu4 , zoone-a0a067qty7 , zoone-a0a067rk35 , zoone-a0a067rk64 , zoone-a0a067rj74 , zoone-a0a067rp97 , zoone-a0a067rjm1

Title : Genome of the house fly, Musca domestica L., a global vector of diseases with adaptations to a septic environment - Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
Author(s) : Scott JG , Warren WC , Beukeboom LW , Bopp D , Clark AG , Giers SD , Hediger M , Jones AK , Kasai S , Leichter CA , Li M , Meisel RP , Minx P , Murphy TD , Nelson DR , Reid WR , Rinkevich FD , Robertson HM , Sackton TB , Sattelle DB , Thibaud-Nissen F , Tomlinson C , van de Zande L , Walden KK , Wilson RK , Liu N
Ref : Genome Biol , 15 :466 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Adult house flies, Musca domestica L., are mechanical vectors of more than 100 devastating diseases that have severe consequences for human and animal health. House fly larvae play a vital role as decomposers of animal wastes, and thus live in intimate association with many animal pathogens. RESULTS: We have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the house fly using DNA from female flies. The sequenced genome is 691 Mb. Compared with Drosophila melanogaster, the genome contains a rich resource of shared and novel protein coding genes, a significantly higher amount of repetitive elements, and substantial increases in copy number and diversity of both the recognition and effector components of the immune system, consistent with life in a pathogen-rich environment. There are 146 P450 genes, plus 11 pseudogenes, in M. domestica, representing a significant increase relative to D. melanogaster and suggesting the presence of enhanced detoxification in house flies. Relative to D. melanogaster, M. domestica has also evolved an expanded repertoire of chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins, many associated with gustation. CONCLUSIONS: This represents the first genome sequence of an insect that lives in intimate association with abundant animal pathogens. The house fly genome provides a rich resource for enabling work on innovative methods of insect control, for understanding the mechanisms of insecticide resistance, genetic adaptation to high pathogen loads, and for exploring the basic biology of this important pest. The genome of this species will also serve as a close out-group to Drosophila in comparative genomic studies.
ESTHER : Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
PubMedSearch : Scott_2014_Genome.Biol_15_466
PubMedID: 25315136
Gene_locus related to this paper: musdo-a0a1i8n2v5 , musdo-a0a1i8n5k8

Title : Finding the missing honey bee genes: lessons learned from a genome upgrade - Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Worley KC , Bennett AK , Beye M , Camara F , Childers CP , de Graaf DC , Debyser G , Deng J , Devreese B , Elhaik E , Evans JD , Foster LJ , Graur D , Guigo R , Hoff KJ , Holder ME , Hudson ME , Hunt GJ , Jiang H , Joshi V , Khetani RS , Kosarev P , Kovar CL , Ma J , Maleszka R , Moritz RF , Munoz-Torres MC , Murphy TD , Muzny DM , Newsham IF , Reese JT , Robertson HM , Robinson GE , Rueppell O , Solovyev V , Stanke M , Stolle E , Tsuruda JM , Vaerenbergh MV , Waterhouse RM , Weaver DB , Whitfield CW , Wu Y , Zdobnov EM , Zhang L , Zhu D , Gibbs RA
Ref : BMC Genomics , 15 :86 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The first generation of genome sequence assemblies and annotations have had a significant impact upon our understanding of the biology of the sequenced species, the phylogenetic relationships among species, the study of populations within and across species, and have informed the biology of humans. As only a few Metazoan genomes are approaching finished quality (human, mouse, fly and worm), there is room for improvement of most genome assemblies. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) genome, published in 2006, was noted for its bimodal GC content distribution that affected the quality of the assembly in some regions and for fewer genes in the initial gene set (OGSv1.0) compared to what would be expected based on other sequenced insect genomes.
RESULTS: Here, we report an improved honey bee genome assembly (Amel_4.5) with a new gene annotation set (OGSv3.2), and show that the honey bee genome contains a number of genes similar to that of other insect genomes, contrary to what was suggested in OGSv1.0. The new genome assembly is more contiguous and complete and the new gene set includes ~5000 more protein-coding genes, 50% more than previously reported. About 1/6 of the additional genes were due to improvements to the assembly, and the remaining were inferred based on new RNAseq and protein data.
CONCLUSIONS: Lessons learned from this genome upgrade have important implications for future genome sequencing projects. Furthermore, the improvements significantly enhance genomic resources for the honey bee, a key model for social behavior and essential to global ecology through pollination.
ESTHER : Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
PubMedID: 24479613

Title : The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex - Colbourne_2011_Science_331_555
Author(s) : Colbourne JK , Pfrender ME , Gilbert D , Thomas WK , Tucker A , Oakley TH , Tokishita S , Aerts A , Arnold GJ , Basu MK , Bauer DJ , Caceres CE , Carmel L , Casola C , Choi JH , Detter JC , Dong Q , Dusheyko S , Eads BD , Frohlich T , Geiler-Samerotte KA , Gerlach D , Hatcher P , Jogdeo S , Krijgsveld J , Kriventseva EV , Kultz D , Laforsch C , Lindquist E , Lopez J , Manak JR , Muller J , Pangilinan J , Patwardhan RP , Pitluck S , Pritham EJ , Rechtsteiner A , Rho M , Rogozin IB , Sakarya O , Salamov A , Schaack S , Shapiro H , Shiga Y , Skalitzky C , Smith Z , Souvorov A , Sung W , Tang Z , Tsuchiya D , Tu H , Vos H , Wang M , Wolf YI , Yamagata H , Yamada T , Ye Y , Shaw JR , Andrews J , Crease TJ , Tang H , Lucas SM , Robertson HM , Bork P , Koonin EV , Zdobnov EM , Grigoriev IV , Lynch M , Boore JL
Ref : Science , 331 :555 , 2011
Abstract : We describe the draft genome of the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex, which is only 200 megabases and contains at least 30,907 genes. The high gene count is a consequence of an elevated rate of gene duplication resulting in tandem gene clusters. More than a third of Daphnia's genes have no detectable homologs in any other available proteome, and the most amplified gene families are specific to the Daphnia lineage. The coexpansion of gene families interacting within metabolic pathways suggests that the maintenance of duplicated genes is not random, and the analysis of gene expression under different environmental conditions reveals that numerous paralogs acquire divergent expression patterns soon after duplication. Daphnia-specific genes, including many additional loci within sequenced regions that are otherwise devoid of annotations, are the most responsive genes to ecological challenges.
ESTHER : Colbourne_2011_Science_331_555
PubMedSearch : Colbourne_2011_Science_331_555
PubMedID: 21292972
Gene_locus related to this paper: dappu-e9fut0 , dappu-e9fut9 , dappu-e9fvw6 , dappu-e9fxt4 , dappu-e9fyr6 , dappu-e9fzg6 , dappu-e9g1e2 , dappu-e9g1e6 , dappu-e9g1e7 , dappu-e9g1e8 , dappu-e9g1v3 , dappu-e9g1z2 , dappu-e9gb99 , dappu-e9gba0 , dappu-e9gcb4 , dappu-e9gdv5 , dappu-e9gdv7 , dappu-e9gi24 , dappu-e9gj77 , dappu-e9gja7 , dappu-e9gmp5 , dappu-e9gmr0 , dappu-e9gn32 , dappu-e9gp76 , dappu-e9gp82 , dappu-e9gp98 , dappu-e9gp99 , dappu-e9gvl2 , dappu-e9gzn7 , dappu-e9h1p4 , dappu-e9h2c8 , dappu-e9h2c9 , dappu-e9h6x9 , dappu-e9h6y4 , dappu-e9h7w9 , dappu-e9h8r4 , dappu-e9hd06 , dappu-e9hh56 , dappu-e9hh57 , dappu-e9hh59 , dappu-e9hmp4 , dappu-e9hp64 , dappu-e9hp65 , dappu-e9hpy8 , dappu-e9htg8 , dapul-ACHE1 , dapul-ACHE2 , dappu-e9gnj1 , dappu-e9gu36 , dappu-e9hpc4 , dappu-e9gb07 , dappu-e9glp6 , dappu-e9glp5 , dappu-e9gjv2 , dappu-e9h0c7 , dappu-e9g4g2 , dappu-e9gw69 , dappu-e9h3h9 , dappu-e9g545 , dappu-e9gw71 , dappu-e9gw68 , dappu-e9h3e7 , dappu-e9gfg9 , dappu-e9fvy6 , dappu-e9hgt2

Title : Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species - Werren_2010_Science_327_343
Author(s) : Werren JH , Richards S , Desjardins CA , Niehuis O , Gadau J , Colbourne JK , Beukeboom LW , Desplan C , Elsik CG , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Kitts P , Lynch JA , Murphy T , Oliveira DC , Smith CD , van de Zande L , Worley KC , Zdobnov EM , Aerts M , Albert S , Anaya VH , Anzola JM , Barchuk AR , Behura SK , Bera AN , Berenbaum MR , Bertossa RC , Bitondi MM , Bordenstein SR , Bork P , Bornberg-Bauer E , Brunain M , Cazzamali G , Chaboub L , Chacko J , Chavez D , Childers CP , Choi JH , Clark ME , Claudianos C , Clinton RA , Cree AG , Cristino AS , Dang PM , Darby AC , de Graaf DC , Devreese B , Dinh HH , Edwards R , Elango N , Elhaik E , Ermolaeva O , Evans JD , Foret S , Fowler GR , Gerlach D , Gibson JD , Gilbert DG , Graur D , Grunder S , Hagen DE , Han Y , Hauser F , Hultmark D , Hunter HCt , Hurst GD , Jhangian SN , Jiang H , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Junier T , Kadowaki T , Kamping A , Kapustin Y , Kechavarzi B , Kim J , Kiryutin B , Koevoets T , Kovar CL , Kriventseva EV , Kucharski R , Lee H , Lee SL , Lees K , Lewis LR , Loehlin DW , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Lopez JA , Lozado RJ , Maglott D , Maleszka R , Mayampurath A , Mazur DJ , McClure MA , Moore AD , Morgan MB , Muller J , Munoz-Torres MC , Muzny DM , Nazareth LV , Neupert S , Nguyen NB , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Okwuonu GO , Pannebakker BA , Pejaver VR , Peng Z , Pratt SC , Predel R , Pu LL , Ranson H , Raychoudhury R , Rechtsteiner A , Reese JT , Reid JG , Riddle M , Robertson HM , Romero-Severson J , Rosenberg M , Sackton TB , Sattelle DB , Schluns H , Schmitt T , Schneider M , Schuler A , Schurko AM , Shuker DM , Simoes ZL , Sinha S , Smith Z , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Springauf A , Stafflinger E , Stage DE , Stanke M , Tanaka Y , Telschow A , Trent C , Vattathil S , Verhulst EC , Viljakainen L , Wanner KW , Waterhouse RM , Whitfield JB , Wilkes TE , Williamson MS , Willis JH , Wolschin F , Wyder S , Yamada T , Yi SV , Zecher CN , Zhang L , Gibbs RA , Williamson M
Ref : Science , 327 :343 , 2010
Abstract : We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging genetic model, particularly for evolutionary and developmental genetics. Key findings include the identification of a functional DNA methylation tool kit; hymenopteran-specific genes including diverse venoms; lateral gene transfers among Pox viruses, Wolbachia, and Nasonia; and the rapid evolution of genes involved in nuclear-mitochondrial interactions that are implicated in speciation. Newly developed genome resources advance Nasonia for genetic research, accelerate mapping and cloning of quantitative trait loci, and will ultimately provide tools and knowledge for further increasing the utility of parasitoids as pest insect-control agents.
ESTHER : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedSearch : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedID: 20075255
Gene_locus related to this paper: nasvi-ACHE1 , nasvi-ACHE2 , nasvi-k7in31 , nasvi-k7iwl9 , nasvi-k7iyk8 , nasvi-k7jlv1 , nasvi-k7in32 , nasvi-k7ind2 , nasvi-k7inh0 , nasvi-k7inh1 , nasvi-k7inh2 , nasvi-k7inp9 , nasvi-k7iun7 , nasvi-k7iv21 , nasvi-k7ivn5 , nasvi-k7ivn6 , nasvi-k7iw29 , nasvi-k7iwk5 , nasvi-k7iwl8 , nasvi-k7iz24 , nasvi-k7izb4 , nasvi-k7j5u6 , nasvi-k7j6y1 , nasvi-k7j6y2 , nasvi-k7j6y4 , nasvi-k7j718 , nasvi-k7j755 , nasvi-k7j756 , nasvi-k7j757 , nasvi-k7j7k5 , nasvi-k7j7n7 , nasvi-k7j7r8 , nasvi-k7j7s8 , nasvi-k7j7s9 , nasvi-k7j811 , nasvi-k7iny8 , nasvi-k7izf2 , nasvi-k7iwe2 , nasvi-k7j6w4 , nasvi-k7izl9 , nasvi-k7jf39 , nasvi-k7izl8 , nasvi-k7irf1 , nasvi-k7j7l1

Title : Genome sequences of the human body louse and its primary endosymbiont provide insights into the permanent parasitic lifestyle - Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
Author(s) : Kirkness EF , Haas BJ , Sun W , Braig HR , Perotti MA , Clark JM , Lee SH , Robertson HM , Kennedy RC , Elhaik E , Gerlach D , Kriventseva EV , Elsik CG , Graur D , Hill CA , Veenstra JA , Walenz B , Tubio JM , Ribeiro JM , Rozas J , Johnston JS , Reese JT , Popadic A , Tojo M , Raoult D , Reed DL , Tomoyasu Y , Kraus E , Mittapalli O , Margam VM , Li HM , Meyer JM , Johnson RM , Romero-Severson J , Vanzee JP , Alvarez-Ponce D , Vieira FG , Aguade M , Guirao-Rico S , Anzola JM , Yoon KS , Strycharz JP , Unger MF , Christley S , Lobo NF , Seufferheld MJ , Wang N , Dasch GA , Struchiner CJ , Madey G , Hannick LI , Bidwell S , Joardar V , Caler E , Shao R , Barker SC , Cameron S , Bruggner RV , Regier A , Johnson J , Viswanathan L , Utterback TR , Sutton GG , Lawson D , Waterhouse RM , Venter JC , Strausberg RL , Berenbaum MR , Collins FH , Zdobnov EM , Pittendrigh BR
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 107 :12168 , 2010
Abstract : As an obligatory parasite of humans, the body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus) is an important vector for human diseases, including epidemic typhus, relapsing fever, and trench fever. Here, we present genome sequences of the body louse and its primary bacterial endosymbiont Candidatus Riesia pediculicola. The body louse has the smallest known insect genome, spanning 108 Mb. Despite its status as an obligate parasite, it retains a remarkably complete basal insect repertoire of 10,773 protein-coding genes and 57 microRNAs. Representing hemimetabolous insects, the genome of the body louse thus provides a reference for studies of holometabolous insects. Compared with other insect genomes, the body louse genome contains significantly fewer genes associated with environmental sensing and response, including odorant and gustatory receptors and detoxifying enzymes. The unique architecture of the 18 minicircular mitochondrial chromosomes of the body louse may be linked to the loss of the gene encoding the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein. The genome of the obligatory louse endosymbiont Candidatus Riesia pediculicola encodes less than 600 genes on a short, linear chromosome and a circular plasmid. The plasmid harbors a unique arrangement of genes required for the synthesis of pantothenate, an essential vitamin deficient in the louse diet. The human body louse, its primary endosymbiont, and the bacterial pathogens that it vectors all possess genomes reduced in size compared with their free-living close relatives. Thus, the body louse genome project offers unique information and tools to use in advancing understanding of coevolution among vectors, symbionts, and pathogens.
ESTHER : Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
PubMedSearch : Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
PubMedID: 20566863
Gene_locus related to this paper: pedhb-ACHE1 , pedhb-ACHE2 , pedhc-e0v9b5 , pedhc-e0v9b6 , pedhc-e0v9b7 , pedhc-e0vbv5 , pedhc-e0vcd0 , pedhc-e0vcl7 , pedhc-e0vd69 , pedhc-e0ve50 , pedhc-e0vel6 , pedhc-e0vel7 , pedhc-e0vf98 , pedhc-e0vfs8 , pedhc-e0vfv0 , pedhc-e0vg01 , pedhc-e0vha2 , pedhc-e0vha4 , pedhc-e0vi52 , pedhc-e0vp42 , pedhc-e0vqu6 , pedhc-e0vuj9 , pedhc-e0vup6 , pedhc-e0vv55 , pedhc-e0vwv3 , pedhc-e0vxf7 , pedhc-e0vxg1 , pedhc-e0w4a6 , pedhc-e0w4c8 , pedhc-e0w271 , pedhc-e0w444 , pedhc-e0vym0 , pedhc-e0vdk9 , pedhc-e0vk10 , pedhc-e0vgw4 , pedhc-e0vgw7 , pedhc-e0vga1 , pedhc-e0w3s1 , pedhc-e0vzt2

Title : The genome of the model beetle and pest Tribolium castaneum - Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
Author(s) : Richards S , Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Brown SJ , Denell R , Beeman RW , Gibbs R , Bucher G , Friedrich M , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Klingler M , Lorenzen M , Roth S , Schroder R , Tautz D , Zdobnov EM , Muzny D , Attaway T , Bell S , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Chavez D , Clerk-Blankenburg KP , Cree A , Dao M , Davis C , Chacko J , Dinh H , Dugan-Rocha S , Fowler G , Garner TT , Garnes J , Gnirke A , Hawes A , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Jackson L , Kovar C , Kowis A , Lee S , Lewis LR , Margolis J , Morgan M , Nazareth LV , Nguyen N , Okwuonu G , Parker D , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Savard J , Scherer SE , Schneider B , Sodergren E , Vattahil S , Villasana D , White CS , Wright R , Park Y , Lord J , Oppert B , Brown S , Wang L , Weinstock G , Liu Y , Worley K , Elsik CG , Reese JT , Elhaik E , Landan G , Graur D , Arensburger P , Atkinson P , Beidler J , Demuth JP , Drury DW , Du YZ , Fujiwara H , Maselli V , Osanai M , Robertson HM , Tu Z , Wang JJ , Wang S , Song H , Zhang L , Werner D , Stanke M , Morgenstern B , Solovyev V , Kosarev P , Brown G , Chen HC , Ermolaeva O , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Souvorov A , Mackey AJ , Waterhouse RM , Wyder S , Kriventseva EV , Kadowaki T , Bork P , Aranda M , Bao R , Beermann A , Berns N , Bolognesi R , Bonneton F , Bopp D , Butts T , Chaumot A , Denell RE , Ferrier DE , Gordon CM , Jindra M , Lan Q , Lattorff HM , Laudet V , von Levetsow C , Liu Z , Lutz R , Lynch JA , da Fonseca RN , Posnien N , Reuter R , Schinko JB , Schmitt C , Schoppmeier M , Shippy TD , Simonnet F , Marques-Souza H , Tomoyasu Y , Trauner J , Van der Zee M , Vervoort M , Wittkopp N , Wimmer EA , Yang X , Jones AK , Sattelle DB , Ebert PR , Nelson D , Scott JG , Muthukrishnan S , Kramer KJ , Arakane Y , Zhu Q , Hogenkamp D , Dixit R , Jiang H , Zou Z , Marshall J , Elpidina E , Vinokurov K , Oppert C , Evans J , Lu Z , Zhao P , Sumathipala N , Altincicek B , Vilcinskas A , Williams M , Hultmark D , Hetru C , Hauser F , Cazzamali G , Williamson M , Li B , Tanaka Y , Predel R , Neupert S , Schachtner J , Verleyen P , Raible F , Walden KK , Angeli S , Foret S , Schuetz S , Maleszka R , Miller SC , Grossmann D
Ref : Nature , 452 :949 , 2008
Abstract : Tribolium castaneum is a member of the most species-rich eukaryotic order, a powerful model organism for the study of generalized insect development, and an important pest of stored agricultural products. We describe its genome sequence here. This omnivorous beetle has evolved the ability to interact with a diverse chemical environment, as shown by large expansions in odorant and gustatory receptors, as well as P450 and other detoxification enzymes. Development in Tribolium is more representative of other insects than is Drosophila, a fact reflected in gene content and function. For example, Tribolium has retained more ancestral genes involved in cell-cell communication than Drosophila, some being expressed in the growth zone crucial for axial elongation in short-germ development. Systemic RNA interference in T. castaneum functions differently from that in Caenorhabditis elegans, but nevertheless offers similar power for the elucidation of gene function and identification of targets for selective insect control.
ESTHER : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedSearch : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedID: 18362917
Gene_locus related to this paper: trica-ACHE1 , trica-ACHE2 , trica-d2a0g9 , trica-d2a0h0 , trica-d2a0w9 , trica-d2a0x0 , trica-d2a0x1 , trica-d2a0x3 , trica-d2a0x4.1 , trica-d2a0x4.2 , trica-d2a0x6 , trica-d2a2b8 , trica-d2a2h1 , trica-d2a3c3 , trica-d2a3g9 , trica-d2a5y5 , trica-d2a309 , trica-d2a514 , trica-d2a515 , trica-d2a516 , trica-d2a577 , trica-d2a578 , trica-d6w6x8 , trica-d6w7f9 , trica-d6w7h2 , trica-d6w8e7 , trica-d6w9c0 , trica-d6w855 , trica-d6wac8 , trica-d6wan4 , trica-d6wd50 , trica-d6wd73 , trica-d6wd74 , trica-A0A139WM97 , trica-d6wfu3 , trica-d6wgl2 , trica-d6wj57 , trica-d6wj59 , trica-d6wjs3 , trica-d6wl31 , trica-d6wnv1 , trica-d6wpl0 , trica-d6wqd6 , trica-d6wqr4 , trica-d6ws52 , trica-d6wsm0 , trica-d6wu38 , trica-d6wu39 , trica-d6wu40 , trica-d6wu41 , trica-d6wu44 , trica-d6wvk5 , trica-d6wvz7 , trica-d6wwu9 , trica-d6wwv0 , trica-d6wxz0 , trica-d6wyy1 , trica-d6wyy2 , trica-d6x0z2 , trica-d6x0z5 , trica-d6x0z6 , trica-d6x4b2 , trica-d6x4e8 , trica-d6x4e9 , trica-d6x197 , trica-d7eip7 , trica-d7eld3 , trica-d7us45 , trica-q5wm43 , trica-q5zex9 , trica-d6wie5 , trica-d6w7t0 , trica-d6x4h0 , trica-d6x4h1 , trica-a0a139wae8 , trica-a0a139wc96 , trica-d6x325 , trica-d2a4s2 , trica-d6wvw8