Doddapaneni H

References (6)

Title : Hemimetabolous genomes reveal molecular basis of termite eusociality - Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
Author(s) : Harrison MC , Jongepier E , Robertson HM , Arning N , Bitard-Feildel T , Chao H , Childers CP , Dinh H , Doddapaneni H , Dugan S , Gowin J , Greiner C , Han Y , Hu H , Hughes DST , Huylmans AK , Kemena C , Kremer LPM , Lee SL , Lopez-Ezquerra A , Mallet L , Monroy-Kuhn JM , Moser A , Murali SC , Muzny DM , Otani S , Piulachs MD , Poelchau M , Qu J , Schaub F , Wada-Katsumata A , Worley KC , Xie Q , Ylla G , Poulsen M , Gibbs RA , Schal C , Richards S , Belles X , Korb J , Bornberg-Bauer E
Ref : Nat Ecol Evol , 2 :557 , 2018
Abstract : Around 150 million years ago, eusocial termites evolved from within the cockroaches, 50 million years before eusocial Hymenoptera, such as bees and ants, appeared. Here, we report the 2-Gb genome of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, and the 1.3-Gb genome of the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus. We show evolutionary signatures of termite eusociality by comparing the genomes and transcriptomes of three termites and the cockroach against the background of 16 other eusocial and non-eusocial insects. Dramatic adaptive changes in genes underlying the production and perception of pheromones confirm the importance of chemical communication in the termites. These are accompanied by major changes in gene regulation and the molecular evolution of caste determination. Many of these results parallel molecular mechanisms of eusocial evolution in Hymenoptera. However, the specific solutions are remarkably different, thus revealing a striking case of convergence in one of the major evolutionary transitions in biological complexity.
ESTHER : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedSearch : Harrison_2018_Nat.Ecol.Evol_2_557
PubMedID: 29403074
Gene_locus related to this paper: blage-a0a2p8y5s3 , blage-a0a2p8yjf8.2 , blage-a0a2p8xjb6

Title : The whole genome sequence of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), reveals insights into the biology and adaptive evolution of a highly invasive pest species - Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
Author(s) : Papanicolaou A , Schetelig MF , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Benoit JB , Bourtzis K , Castanera P , Cavanaugh JP , Chao H , Childers C , Curril I , Dinh H , Doddapaneni H , Dolan A , Dugan S , Friedrich M , Gasperi G , Geib S , Georgakilas G , Gibbs RA , Giers SD , Gomulski LM , Gonzalez-Guzman M , Guillem-Amat A , Han Y , Hatzigeorgiou AG , Hernandez-Crespo P , Hughes DS , Jones JW , Karagkouni D , Koskinioti P , Lee SL , Malacrida AR , Manni M , Mathiopoulos K , Meccariello A , Murali SC , Murphy TD , Muzny DM , Oberhofer G , Ortego F , Paraskevopoulou MD , Poelchau M , Qu J , Reczko M , Robertson HM , Rosendale AJ , Rosselot AE , Saccone G , Salvemini M , Savini G , Schreiner P , Scolari F , Siciliano P , Sim SB , Tsiamis G , Urena E , Vlachos IS , Werren JH , Wimmer EA , Worley KC , Zacharopoulou A , Richards S , Handler AM
Ref : Genome Biol , 17 :192 , 2016
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata, is a major destructive insect pest due to its broad host range, which includes hundreds of fruits and vegetables. It exhibits a unique ability to invade and adapt to ecological niches throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, though medfly infestations have been prevented and controlled by the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of integrated pest management programs (IPMs). The genetic analysis and manipulation of medfly has been subject to intensive study in an effort to improve SIT efficacy and other aspects of IPM control.
RESULTS: The 479 Mb medfly genome is sequenced from adult flies from lines inbred for 20 generations. A high-quality assembly is achieved having a contig N50 of 45.7 kb and scaffold N50 of 4.06 Mb. In-depth curation of more than 1800 messenger RNAs shows specific gene expansions that can be related to invasiveness and host adaptation, including gene families for chemoreception, toxin and insecticide metabolism, cuticle proteins, opsins, and aquaporins. We identify genes relevant to IPM control, including those required to improve SIT.
CONCLUSIONS: The medfly genome sequence provides critical insights into the biology of one of the most serious and widespread agricultural pests. This knowledge should significantly advance the means of controlling the size and invasive potential of medfly populations. Its close relationship to Drosophila, and other insect species important to agriculture and human health, will further comparative functional and structural studies of insect genomes that should broaden our understanding of gene family evolution.
ESTHER : Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
PubMedSearch : Papanicolaou_2016_Genome.Biol_17_192
PubMedID: 27659211

Title : Genome sequence of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus reveals mechanisms governing adaptation to a humic-rich ecological niche - Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
Author(s) : Morin E , Kohler A , Baker AR , Foulongne-Oriol M , Lombard V , Nagy LG , Ohm RA , Patyshakuliyeva A , Brun A , Aerts AL , Bailey AM , Billette C , Coutinho PM , Deakin G , Doddapaneni H , Floudas D , Grimwood J , Hilden K , Kues U , LaButti KM , Lapidus A , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Murat C , Riley RW , Salamov AA , Schmutz J , Subramanian V , Wosten HA , Xu J , Eastwood DC , Foster GD , Sonnenberg AS , Cullen D , de Vries RP , Lundell T , Hibbett DS , Henrissat B , Burton KS , Kerrigan RW , Challen MP , Grigoriev IV , Martin F
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 109 :17501 , 2012
Abstract : Agaricus bisporus is the model fungus for the adaptation, persistence, and growth in the humic-rich leaf-litter environment. Aside from its ecological role, A. bisporus has been an important component of the human diet for over 200 y and worldwide cultivation of the "button mushroom" forms a multibillion dollar industry. We present two A. bisporus genomes, their gene repertoires and transcript profiles on compost and during mushroom formation. The genomes encode a full repertoire of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes similar to that of wood-decayers. Comparative transcriptomics of mycelium grown on defined medium, casing-soil, and compost revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in xylan, cellulose, pectin, and protein degradation are more highly expressed in compost. The striking expansion of heme-thiolate peroxidases and beta-etherases is distinctive from Agaricomycotina wood-decayers and suggests a broad attack on decaying lignin and related metabolites found in humic acid-rich environment. Similarly, up-regulation of these genes together with a lignolytic manganese peroxidase, multiple copper radical oxidases, and cytochrome P450s is consistent with challenges posed by complex humic-rich substrates. The gene repertoire and expression of hydrolytic enzymes in A. bisporus is substantially different from the taxonomically related ectomycorrhizal symbiont Laccaria bicolor. A common promoter motif was also identified in genes very highly expressed in humic-rich substrates. These observations reveal genetic and enzymatic mechanisms governing adaptation to the humic-rich ecological niche formed during plant degradation, further defining the critical role such fungi contribute to soil structure and carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Genome sequence will expedite mushroom breeding for improved agronomic characteristics.
ESTHER : Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
PubMedSearch : Morin_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_17501
PubMedID: 23045686
Gene_locus related to this paper: agabu-k5x1b4 , agabu-k5x521 , agabu-k5w389 , agabu-k5wbk9 , agabu-k5wrh0 , agabu-k5ws85 , agabu-k5wsf9 , agabu-k5wxv1 , agabu-k5x0d9 , agabu-k5x588 , agabu-k5x5x2 , agabu-k5xd51 , agabu-k5xh54 , agabu-k5xsm1 , agabu-k5xsp8 , agabu-k5xtc1 , agabu-k5y2v2 , agabb-k9i3g9 , agabb-k9hnv7 , agabb-k9hr46 , agabu-k5wys0

Title : Comparative genomics of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phanerochaete chrysosporium provide insight into selective ligninolysis - Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
Author(s) : Fernandez-Fueyo E , Ruiz-Duenas FJ , Ferreira P , Floudas D , Hibbett DS , Canessa P , Larrondo LF , James TY , Seelenfreund D , Lobos S , Polanco R , Tello M , Honda Y , Watanabe T , Ryu JS , Kubicek CP , Schmoll M , Gaskell J , Hammel KE , St John FJ , Vanden Wymelenberg A , Sabat G , Splinter BonDurant S , Syed K , Yadav JS , Doddapaneni H , Subramanian V , Lavin JL , Oguiza JA , Perez G , Pisabarro AG , Ramirez L , Santoyo F , Master E , Coutinho PM , Henrissat B , Lombard V , Magnuson JK , Kues U , Hori C , Igarashi K , Samejima M , Held BW , Barry KW , LaButti KM , Lapidus A , Lindquist EA , Lucas SM , Riley R , Salamov AA , Hoffmeister D , Schwenk D , Hadar Y , Yarden O , de Vries RP , Wiebenga A , Stenlid J , Eastwood D , Grigoriev IV , Berka RM , Blanchette RA , Kersten P , Martinez AT , Vicuna R , Cullen D
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 109 :5458 , 2012
Abstract : Efficient lignin depolymerization is unique to the wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as white rot fungi. Phanerochaete chrysosporium simultaneously degrades lignin and cellulose, whereas the closely related species, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, also depolymerizes lignin but may do so with relatively little cellulose degradation. To investigate the basis for selective ligninolysis, we conducted comparative genome analysis of C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium. Genes encoding manganese peroxidase numbered 13 and five in C. subvermispora and P. chrysosporium, respectively. In addition, the C. subvermispora genome contains at least seven genes predicted to encode laccases, whereas the P. chrysosporium genome contains none. We also observed expansion of the number of C. subvermispora desaturase-encoding genes putatively involved in lipid metabolism. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis showed substantial up-regulation of several desaturase and MnP genes in wood-containing medium. MS identified MnP proteins in C. subvermispora culture filtrates, but none in P. chrysosporium cultures. These results support the importance of MnP and a lignin degradation mechanism whereby cleavage of the dominant nonphenolic structures is mediated by lipid peroxidation products. Two C. subvermispora genes were predicted to encode peroxidases structurally similar to P. chrysosporium lignin peroxidase and, following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, the enzymes were shown to oxidize high redox potential substrates, but not Mn(2+). Apart from oxidative lignin degradation, we also examined cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems in both fungi. In summary, the C. subvermispora genetic inventory and expression patterns exhibit increased oxidoreductase potential and diminished cellulolytic capability relative to P. chrysosporium.
ESTHER : Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
PubMedSearch : Fernandez-Fueyo_2012_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_109_5458
PubMedID: 22434909
Gene_locus related to this paper: cers8-m2r3x2 , cers8-m2qf37 , cers8-m2pcy7 , cers8-m2pcz3 , cers8-m2qn26 , cers8-m2r654 , cers8-m2r8g9 , cers8-m2ps90 , cers8-m2qn44 , cers8-m2q837 , cers8-m2pjy6 , cers8-m2r609 , cers8-m2qy35 , cers8-m2r1n1 , cers8-m2rl22 , cers8-m2qkx5 , cers8-m2qib7 , cers8-m2rgs8 , cers8-m2rlx6 , cers8-m2r4p3 , cers8-m2rf62 , cers8-m2qyx5 , cers8-m2pcz2 , cers8-m2rm22 , cers8-m2qwb7 , cers8-m2r9u3 , cers8-m2pp23 , cers8-m2r613 , cers8-m2rup8 , cers8-m2piv7 , cers8-m2rch3 , cers8-m2qvf7 , cers8-m2qvb7 , cers8-m2qvb2 , cers8-m2pip7 , cers8-m2rb73 , cers8-m2qgd3 , cers8-m2rcg8 , cers8-m2rb68

Title : Complete genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' obtained through metagenomics - Duan_2009_Mol.Plant.Microbe.Interact_22_1011
Author(s) : Duan Y , Zhou L , Hall DG , Li W , Doddapaneni H , Lin H , Liu L , Vahling CM , Gabriel DW , Williams KP , Dickerman A , Sun Y , Gottwald T
Ref : Mol Plant Microbe Interact , 22 :1011 , 2009
Abstract : Citrus huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with a low-titer, phloem-limited infection by any of three uncultured species of alpha-Proteobacteria, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. A complete circular 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome has been obtained by metagenomics, using the DNA extracted from a single 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllid. The 1.23-Mb genome has an average 36.5% GC content. Annotation revealed a high percentage of genes involved in both cell motility (4.5%) and active transport in general (8.0%), which may contribute to its virulence. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have a limited ability for aerobic respiration and is likely auxotrophic for at least five amino acids. Consistent with its intracellular nature, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' lacks type III and type IV secretion systems as well as typical free-living or plant-colonizing extracellular degradative enzymes. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have all type I secretion system genes needed for both multidrug efflux and toxin effector secretion. Multi-protein phylogenetic analysis confirmed 'Ca. L. asiaticus' as an early-branching and highly divergent member of the family Rhizobiaceae. This is the first genome sequence of an uncultured alpha-proteobacteria that is both an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont.
ESTHER : Duan_2009_Mol.Plant.Microbe.Interact_22_1011
PubMedSearch : Duan_2009_Mol.Plant.Microbe.Interact_22_1011
PubMedID: 19589076
Gene_locus related to this paper: libap-c6xhk4 , libap-c6xgr3

Title : Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion - Martinez_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_1954
Author(s) : Martinez D , Challacombe J , Morgenstern I , Hibbett D , Schmoll M , Kubicek CP , Ferreira P , Ruiz-Duenas FJ , Martinez AT , Kersten P , Hammel KE , Vanden Wymelenberg A , Gaskell J , Lindquist E , Sabat G , Bondurant SS , Larrondo LF , Canessa P , Vicuna R , Yadav J , Doddapaneni H , Subramanian V , Pisabarro AG , Lavin JL , Oguiza JA , Master E , Henrissat B , Coutinho PM , Harris P , Magnuson JK , Baker SE , Bruno K , Kenealy W , Hoegger PJ , Kues U , Ramaiya P , Lucas S , Salamov A , Shapiro H , Tu H , Chee CL , Misra M , Xie G , Teter S , Yaver D , James T , Mokrejs M , Pospisek M , Grigoriev IV , Brettin T , Rokhsar D , Berka R , Cullen D
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 106 :1954 , 2009
Abstract : Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome, and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative beta-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose-grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Also up-regulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H(2)O(2). These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons with the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.
ESTHER : Martinez_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_1954
PubMedSearch : Martinez_2009_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_106_1954
PubMedID: 19193860
Gene_locus related to this paper: pospm-b8p1f3 , pospm-b8p2q7 , pospm-b8p4n0 , pospm-b8p4n9 , pospm-b8p5g9 , pospm-b8p5r9 , pospm-b8p6h2 , pospm-b8p7b1 , pospm-b8p7c4 , pospm-b8p8w7 , pospm-b8p9j1 , pospm-b8p164 , pospm-b8p280 , pospm-b8p423.1 , pospm-b8p423.2 , pospm-b8p858 , pospm-b8pam2 , pospm-b8pam5 , pospm-b8pb68 , pospm-b8pbm3 , pospm-b8pc54 , pospm-b8pc56 , pospm-b8pce4 , pospm-b8pd91 , pospm-b8pdk6 , pospm-b8ph32 , pospm-b8ph43 , pospm-b8phc9 , pospm-b8php7 , pospm-b8phy5 , pospm-b8pjg8 , pospm-b8pji9 , pospm-b8plr5 , pospm-b8pmk3 , pospm-b8pfg0 , pospm-b8pg35 , pospm-b8pa20.1 , pospm-b8pa20.2 , pospm-b8p4g8 , pospm-b8phn6