Salzberg SL

References (50)

Title : First Draft Genome Sequence of the Pathogenic Fungus Lomentospora prolificans (Formerly Scedosporium prolificans) - Luo_2017_G3.(Bethesda)_7_3831
Author(s) : Luo R , Zimin A , Workman R , Fan Y , Pertea G , Grossman N , Wear MP , Jia B , Miller H , Casadevall A , Timp W , Zhang SX , Salzberg SL
Ref : G3 (Bethesda) , 7 :3831 , 2017
Abstract : Here we describe the sequencing and assembly of the pathogenic fungus Lomentospora prolificans using a combination of short, highly accurate Illumina reads and additional coverage in very long Oxford Nanopore reads. The resulting assembly is highly contiguous, containing a total of 37,627,092 bp with over 98% of the sequence in just 26 scaffolds. Annotation identified 8896 protein-coding genes. Pulsed-field gel analysis suggests that this organism contains at least 7 and possibly 11 chromosomes, the two longest of which have sizes corresponding closely to the sizes of the longest scaffolds, at 6.6 and 5.7 Mb.
ESTHER : Luo_2017_G3.(Bethesda)_7_3831
PubMedSearch : Luo_2017_G3.(Bethesda)_7_3831
PubMedID: 28963165
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9pezi-a0a2n3nij3 , 9pezi-a0a2n3mzq9 , 9pezi-a0a2n3n7y4

Title : The first near-complete assembly of the hexaploid bread wheat genome, Triticum aestivum - Zimin_2017_Gigascience_6_1
Author(s) : Zimin AV , Puiu D , Hall R , Kingan S , Clavijo BJ , Salzberg SL
Ref : Gigascience , 6 :1 , 2017
Abstract : Common bread wheat, Triticum aestivum, has one of the most complex genomes known to science, with 6 copies of each chromosome, enormous numbers of near-identical sequences scattered throughout, and an overall haploid size of more than 15 billion bases. Multiple past attempts to assemble the genome have produced assemblies that were well short of the estimated genome size. Here we report the first near-complete assembly of T. aestivum, using deep sequencing coverage from a combination of short Illumina reads and very long Pacific Biosciences reads. The final assembly contains 15 344 693 583 bases and has a weighted average (N50) contig size of 232 659 bases. This represents by far the most complete and contiguous assembly of the wheat genome to date, providing a strong foundation for future genetic studies of this important food crop. We also report how we used the recently published genome of Aegilops tauschii, the diploid ancestor of the wheat D genome, to identify 4 179 762 575 bp of T. aestivum that correspond to its D genome components.
ESTHER : Zimin_2017_Gigascience_6_1
PubMedSearch : Zimin_2017_Gigascience_6_1
PubMedID: 29069494
Gene_locus related to this paper: wheat-a0a3b6mrw5 , wheat-a0a1d5uwn5 , wheat-a0a3b6atp7 , wheat-a0a3b6c2a8 , wheat-a0a3b6lu59

Title : The walnut (Juglans regia) genome sequence reveals diversity in genes coding for the biosynthesis of non-structural polyphenols - Martinez-Garcia_2016_Plant.J_87_507
Author(s) : Martinez-Garcia PJ , Crepeau MW , Puiu D , Gonzalez-Ibeas D , Whalen J , Stevens KA , Paul R , Butterfield TS , Britton MT , Reagan RL , Chakraborty S , Walawage SL , Vasquez-Gross HA , Cardeno C , Famula RA , Pratt K , Kuruganti S , Aradhya MK , Leslie CA , Dandekar AM , Salzberg SL , Wegrzyn JL , Langley CH , Neale DB
Ref : Plant J , 87 :507 , 2016
Abstract : The Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.), a diploid species native to the mountainous regions of Central Asia, is the major walnut species cultivated for nut production and is one of the most widespread tree nut species in the world. The high nutritional value of J. regia nuts is associated with a rich array of polyphenolic compounds, whose complete biosynthetic pathways are still unknown. A J. regia genome sequence was obtained from the cultivar 'Chandler' to discover target genes and additional unknown genes. The 667-Mbp genome was assembled using two different methods (SOAPdenovo2 and MaSuRCA), with an N50 scaffold size of 464 955 bp (based on a genome size of 606 Mbp), 221 640 contigs and a GC content of 37%. Annotation with MAKER-P and other genomic resources yielded 32 498 gene models. Previous studies in walnut relying on tissue-specific methods have only identified a single polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene (JrPPO1). Enabled by the J. regia genome sequence, a second homolog of PPO (JrPPO2) was discovered. In addition, about 130 genes in the large gallate 1-beta-glucosyltransferase (GGT) superfamily were detected. Specifically, two genes, JrGGT1 and JrGGT2, were significantly homologous to the GGT from Quercus robur (QrGGT), which is involved in the synthesis of 1-O-galloyl-beta-d-glucose, a precursor for the synthesis of hydrolysable tannins. The reference genome for J. regia provides meaningful insight into the complex pathways required for the synthesis of polyphenols. The walnut genome sequence provides important tools and methods to accelerate breeding and to facilitate the genetic dissection of complex traits.
ESTHER : Martinez-Garcia_2016_Plant.J_87_507
PubMedSearch : Martinez-Garcia_2016_Plant.J_87_507
PubMedID: 27145194
Gene_locus related to this paper: jugre-a0a2i4fez2 , jugre-a0a2i4h0n2 , jugre-a0a2i4gzr6 , jugre-a0a2i4hni2 , jugre-a0a2i4gla1 , jugre-a0a2i4e0e6 , jugre-a0a2i4es54 , jugre-a0a2i4e9m5 , jugre-a0a2i4hql8 , jugre-a0a2i4gf09 , jugre-a0a2i4fj48 , jugre-a0a2i4flz2

Title : First Draft Assembly and Annotation of the Genome of a California Endemic Oak Quercus lobata Ne (Fagaceae) - Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
Author(s) : Sork VL , Fitz-Gibbon ST , Puiu D , Crepeau M , Gugger PF , Sherman R , Stevens K , Langley CH , Pellegrini M , Salzberg SL
Ref : G3 (Bethesda) , 6 :3485 , 2016
Abstract : Oak represents a valuable natural resource across Northern Hemisphere ecosystems, attracting a large research community studying its genetics, ecology, conservation, and management. Here we introduce a draft genome assembly of valley oak (Quercus lobata) using Illumina sequencing of adult leaf tissue of a tree found in an accessible, well-studied, natural southern California population. Our assembly includes a nuclear genome and a complete chloroplast genome, along with annotation of encoded genes. The assembly contains 94,394 scaffolds, totaling 1.17 Gb with 18,512 scaffolds of length 2 kb or longer, with a total length of 1.15 Gb, and a N50 scaffold size of 278,077 kb. The k-mer histograms indicate an diploid genome size of -720-730 Mb, which is smaller than the total length due to high heterozygosity, estimated at 1.25%. A comparison with a recently published European oak (Q. robur) nuclear sequence indicates 93% similarity. The Q. lobata chloroplast genome has 99% identity with another North American oak, Q. rubra Preliminary annotation yielded an estimate of 61,773 predicted protein-coding genes, of which 71% had similarity to known protein domains. We searched 956 Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs, and found 863 complete orthologs, of which 450 were present in > 1 copy. We also examined an earlier version (v0.5) where duplicate haplotypes were removed to discover variants. These additional sources indicate that the predicted gene count in Version 1.0 is overestimated by 37-52%. Nonetheless, this first draft valley oak genome assembly represents a high-quality, well-annotated genome that provides a tool for forest restoration and management practices.
ESTHER : Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
PubMedSearch : Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
PubMedID: 27621377
Gene_locus related to this paper: quelo-a0a7n2rbl4 , quelo-a0a7n2mne3 , quelo-a0a7n2mpu3

Title : The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization - Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
Author(s) : Sadd BM , Barribeau SM , Bloch G , de Graaf DC , Dearden P , Elsik CG , Gadau J , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Hasselmann M , Lozier JD , Robertson HM , Smagghe G , Stolle E , Van Vaerenbergh M , Waterhouse RM , Bornberg-Bauer E , Klasberg S , Bennett AK , Camara F , Guigo R , Hoff K , Mariotti M , Munoz-Torres M , Murphy T , Santesmasses D , Amdam GV , Beckers M , Beye M , Biewer M , Bitondi MM , Blaxter ML , Bourke AF , Brown MJ , Buechel SD , Cameron R , Cappelle K , Carolan JC , Christiaens O , Ciborowski KL , Clarke DF , Colgan TJ , Collins DH , Cridge AG , Dalmay T , Dreier S , du Plessis L , Duncan E , Erler S , Evans J , Falcon T , Flores K , Freitas FC , Fuchikawa T , Gempe T , Hartfelder K , Hauser F , Helbing S , Humann FC , Irvine F , Jermiin LS , Johnson CE , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Kadowaki T , Kidner JH , Koch V , Kohler A , Kraus FB , Lattorff HM , Leask M , Lockett GA , Mallon EB , Antonio DS , Marxer M , Meeus I , Moritz RF , Nair A , Napflin K , Nissen I , Niu J , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Osborne A , Otte M , Pinheiro DG , Rossie N , Rueppell O , Santos CG , Schmid-Hempel R , Schmitt BD , Schulte C , Simoes ZL , Soares MP , Swevers L , Winnebeck EC , Wolschin F , Yu N , Zdobnov EM , Aqrawi PK , Blankenburg KP , Coyle M , Francisco L , Hernandez AG , Holder M , Hudson ME , Jackson L , Jayaseelan J , Joshi V , Kovar C , Lee SL , Mata R , Mathew T , Newsham IF , Ngo R , Okwuonu G , Pham C , Pu LL , Saada N , Santibanez J , Simmons D , Thornton R , Venkat A , Walden KK , Wu YQ , Debyser G , Devreese B , Asher C , Blommaert J , Chipman AD , Chittka L , Fouks B , Liu J , O'Neill MP , Sumner S , Puiu D , Qu J , Salzberg SL , Scherer SE , Muzny DM , Richards S , Robinson GE , Gibbs RA , Schmid-Hempel P , Worley KC
Ref : Genome Biol , 16 :76 , 2015
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats.
RESULTS: We report the high quality draft genome sequences of Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens, two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome features thought to underpin advanced eusociality are also present in bumblebees, indicating an earlier evolution in the bee lineage. Xenobiotic detoxification and immune genes are similarly depauperate in bumblebees and honeybees, and multiple categories of genes linked to social organization, including development and behavior, show high conservation. Key differences identified include a bias in bumblebee chemoreception towards gustation from olfaction, and striking differences in microRNAs, potentially responsible for gene regulation underlying social and other traits.
CONCLUSIONS: These two bumblebee genomes provide a foundation for post-genomic research on these key pollinators and insect societies. Overall, gene repertoires suggest that the route to advanced eusociality in bees was mediated by many small changes in many genes and processes, and not by notable expansion or depauperation.
ESTHER : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedSearch : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedID: 25908251

Title : A new rhesus macaque assembly and annotation for next-generation sequencing analyses - Zimin_2014_Biol.Direct_9_20
Author(s) : Zimin AV , Cornish AS , Maudhoo MD , Gibbs RM , Zhang X , Pandey S , Meehan DT , Wipfler K , Bosinger SE , Johnson ZP , Tharp GK , Marcais G , Roberts M , Ferguson B , Fox HS , Treangen T , Salzberg SL , Yorke JA , Norgren RB, Jr.
Ref : Biol Direct , 9 :20 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is a key species for advancing biomedical research. Like all draft mammalian genomes, the draft rhesus assembly (rheMac2) has gaps, sequencing errors and misassemblies that have prevented automated annotation pipelines from functioning correctly. Another rhesus macaque assembly, CR_1.0, is also available but is substantially more fragmented than rheMac2 with smaller contigs and scaffolds. Annotations for these two assemblies are limited in completeness and accuracy. High quality assembly and annotation files are required for a wide range of studies including expression, genetic and evolutionary analyses.
RESULTS: We report a new de novo assembly of the rhesus macaque genome (MacaM) that incorporates both the original Sanger sequences used to assemble rheMac2 and new Illumina sequences from the same animal. MacaM has a weighted average (N50) contig size of 64 kilobases, more than twice the size of the rheMac2 assembly and almost five times the size of the CR_1.0 assembly. The MacaM chromosome assembly incorporates information from previously unutilized mapping data and preliminary annotation of scaffolds. Independent assessment of the assemblies using Ion Torrent read alignments indicates that MacaM is more complete and accurate than rheMac2 and CR_1.0. We assembled messenger RNA sequences from several rhesus tissues into transcripts which allowed us to identify a total of 11,712 complete proteins representing 9,524 distinct genes. Using a combination of our assembled rhesus macaque transcripts and human transcripts, we annotated 18,757 transcripts and 16,050 genes with complete coding sequences in the MacaM assembly. Further, we demonstrate that the new annotations provide greatly improved accuracy as compared to the current annotations of rheMac2. Finally, we show that the MacaM genome provides an accurate resource for alignment of reads produced by RNA sequence expression studies.
CONCLUSIONS: The MacaM assembly and annotation files provide a substantially more complete and accurate representation of the rhesus macaque genome than rheMac2 or CR_1.0 and will serve as an important resource for investigators conducting next-generation sequencing studies with nonhuman primates. REVIEWERS: This article was reviewed by Dr. Lutz Walter, Dr. Soojin Yi and Dr. Kateryna Makova.
ESTHER : Zimin_2014_Biol.Direct_9_20
PubMedSearch : Zimin_2014_Biol.Direct_9_20
PubMedID: 25319552
Gene_locus related to this paper: macmu-g7n4x3 , macmu-h9er02 , macmu-h9fud6 , macmu-f6qwx1 , macmu-i2cyv7 , macmu-h9zaw9 , macmu-i0fgb6 , macmu-i2cu80 , macmu-f7h550 , macmu-f7gkb9

Title : Two new complete genome sequences offer insight into host and tissue specificity of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp - Bogdanove_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5450
Author(s) : Bogdanove AJ , Koebnik R , Lu H , Furutani A , Angiuoli SV , Patil PB , Van Sluys MA , Ryan RP , Meyer DF , Han SW , Aparna G , Rajaram M , Delcher AL , Phillippy AM , Puiu D , Schatz MC , Shumway M , Sommer DD , Trapnell C , Benahmed F , Dimitrov G , Madupu R , Radune D , Sullivan S , Jha G , Ishihara H , Lee SW , Pandey A , Sharma V , Sriariyanun M , Szurek B , Vera-Cruz CM , Dorman KS , Ronald PC , Verdier V , Dow JM , Sonti RV , Tsuge S , Brendel VP , Rabinowicz PD , Leach JE , White FF , Salzberg SL
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 193 :5450 , 2011
Abstract : Xanthomonas is a large genus of bacteria that collectively cause disease on more than 300 plant species. The broad host range of the genus contrasts with stringent host and tissue specificity for individual species and pathovars. Whole-genome sequences of Xanthomonas campestris pv. raphani strain 756C and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strain BLS256, pathogens that infect the mesophyll tissue of the leading models for plant biology, Arabidopsis thaliana and rice, respectively, were determined and provided insight into the genetic determinants of host and tissue specificity. Comparisons were made with genomes of closely related strains that infect the vascular tissue of the same hosts and across a larger collection of complete Xanthomonas genomes. The results suggest a model in which complex sets of adaptations at the level of gene content account for host specificity and subtler adaptations at the level of amino acid or noncoding regulatory nucleotide sequence determine tissue specificity.
ESTHER : Bogdanove_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5450
PubMedSearch : Bogdanove_2011_J.Bacteriol_193_5450
PubMedID: 21784931
Gene_locus related to this paper: xanax-XAC4055 , xanca-CATD , xanca-estA1 , xanca-XCC0080 , xanca-XCC3164 , xanor-q5h5n1

Title : Genome sequence of the dioxin-mineralizing bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 - Miller_2010_J.Bacteriol_192_6101
Author(s) : Miller TR , Delcher AL , Salzberg SL , Saunders E , Detter JC , Halden RU
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 192 :6101 , 2010
Abstract : Pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins pose a serious threat to human and environmental health. Natural attenuation of these compounds by microorganisms provides one promising avenue for their removal from contaminated areas. Over the past 2 decades, studies of the bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 have provided a wealth of knowledge about how bacteria metabolize chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we describe the finished genome sequence of S. wittichii RW1 and major findings from its annotation.
ESTHER : Miller_2010_J.Bacteriol_192_6101
PubMedSearch : Miller_2010_J.Bacteriol_192_6101
PubMedID: 20833805
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9sphn-a0a0f5pa67 , sphww-a5ve07

Title : Multi-platform next-generation sequencing of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo): genome assembly and analysis - Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
Author(s) : Dalloul RA , Long JA , Zimin AV , Aslam L , Beal K , Blomberg Le A , Bouffard P , Burt DW , Crasta O , Crooijmans RP , Cooper K , Coulombe RA , De S , Delany ME , Dodgson JB , Dong JJ , Evans C , Frederickson KM , Flicek P , Florea L , Folkerts O , Groenen MA , Harkins TT , Herrero J , Hoffmann S , Megens HJ , Jiang A , de Jong P , Kaiser P , Kim H , Kim KW , Kim S , Langenberger D , Lee MK , Lee T , Mane S , Marcais G , Marz M , McElroy AP , Modise T , Nefedov M , Notredame C , Paton IR , Payne WS , Pertea G , Prickett D , Puiu D , Qioa D , Raineri E , Ruffier M , Salzberg SL , Schatz MC , Scheuring C , Schmidt CJ , Schroeder S , Searle SM , Smith EJ , Smith J , Sonstegard TS , Stadler PF , Tafer H , Tu ZJ , Van Tassell CP , Vilella AJ , Williams KP , Yorke JA , Zhang L , Zhang HB , Zhang X , Zhang Y , Reed KM
Ref : PLoS Biol , 8 : , 2010
Abstract : A synergistic combination of two next-generation sequencing platforms with a detailed comparative BAC physical contig map provided a cost-effective assembly of the genome sequence of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Heterozygosity of the sequenced source genome allowed discovery of more than 600,000 high quality single nucleotide variants. Despite this heterozygosity, the current genome assembly ( approximately 1.1 Gb) includes 917 Mb of sequence assigned to specific turkey chromosomes. Annotation identified nearly 16,000 genes, with 15,093 recognized as protein coding and 611 as non-coding RNA genes. Comparative analysis of the turkey, chicken, and zebra finch genomes, and comparing avian to mammalian species, supports the characteristic stability of avian genomes and identifies genes unique to the avian lineage. Clear differences are seen in number and variety of genes of the avian immune system where expansions and novel genes are less frequent than examples of gene loss. The turkey genome sequence provides resources to further understand the evolution of vertebrate genomes and genetic variation underlying economically important quantitative traits in poultry. This integrated approach may be a model for providing both gene and chromosome level assemblies of other species with agricultural, ecological, and evolutionary interest.
ESTHER : Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
PubMedSearch : Dalloul_2010_PLoS.Biol_8_E1000475
PubMedID: 20838655
Gene_locus related to this paper: melga-g1mv74 , melga-g1myh1 , melga-g1n3b6 , melga-g1n4i8 , melga-g1n8a7 , melga-g1nb53 , melga-g1ndd8 , melga-g1npu5 , melga-g3ur65 , melga-g3uur6 , melga-g1njn8 , melga-g1mrp7 , melga-g1mzw6 , melga-g1n2a7 , melga-g1n608 , melga-g1n2j6 , melga-g1n2k0 , melga-g1ncb6 , melga-g1nei5 , melga-g1n1j3 , melga-g1nfd3 , melga-g1nna9 , melga-h9h0c1 , melga-g1nnl1 , melga-g1nhb9 , melga-g1mtl7 , fical-u3jnn0 , melga-g1n332 , melga-g1mtx9 , melga-g1nns1

Title : The complete genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames Ancestor - Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
Author(s) : Ravel J , Jiang L , Stanley ST , Wilson MR , Decker RS , Read TD , Worsham P , Keim PS , Salzberg SL , Fraser-Liggett CM , Rasko DA
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 191 :445 , 2009
Abstract : The pathogenic bacterium Bacillus anthracis has become the subject of intense study as a result of its use in a bioterrorism attack in the United States in September and October 2001. Previous studies suggested that B. anthracis Ames Ancestor, the original Ames fully virulent plasmid-containing isolate, was the ideal reference. This study describes the complete genome sequence of that original isolate, derived from a sample kept in cold storage since 1981.
ESTHER : Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
PubMedSearch : Ravel_2009_J.Bacteriol_191_445
PubMedID: 18952800
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-DHBF , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-PHAC , bacan-a0a6l7h3w8

Title : The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni - Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
Author(s) : Berriman M , Haas BJ , LoVerde PT , Wilson RA , Dillon GP , Cerqueira GC , Mashiyama ST , Al-Lazikani B , Andrade LF , Ashton PD , Aslett MA , Bartholomeu DC , Blandin G , Caffrey CR , Coghlan A , Coulson R , Day TA , Delcher A , DeMarco R , Djikeng A , Eyre T , Gamble JA , Ghedin E , Gu Y , Hertz-Fowler C , Hirai H , Hirai Y , Houston R , Ivens A , Johnston DA , Lacerda D , Macedo CD , McVeigh P , Ning Z , Oliveira G , Overington JP , Parkhill J , Pertea M , Pierce RJ , Protasio AV , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Sajid M , Salzberg SL , Stanke M , Tivey AR , White O , Williams DL , Wortman J , Wu W , Zamanian M , Zerlotini A , Fraser-Liggett CM , Barrell BG , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Nature , 460 :352 , 2009
Abstract : Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. Here we present analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and new families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternative splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the Lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, and the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and new targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints, and a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease.
ESTHER : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedID: 19606141
Gene_locus related to this paper: schma-ACHE1 , schma-ACHE2 , schma-c4qb79 , schma-c4qmk4 , schma-g4v9h7 , schma-BCHE , schma-g4vmf3

Title : A whole-genome assembly of the domestic cow, Bos taurus - Zimin_2009_Genome.Biol_10_R42
Author(s) : Zimin AV , Delcher AL , Florea L , Kelley DR , Schatz MC , Puiu D , Hanrahan F , Pertea G , Van Tassell CP , Sonstegard TS , Marcais G , Roberts M , Subramanian P , Yorke JA , Salzberg SL
Ref : Genome Biol , 10 :R42 , 2009
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The genome of the domestic cow, Bos taurus, was sequenced using a mixture of hierarchical and whole-genome shotgun sequencing methods.
RESULTS: We have assembled the 35 million sequence reads and applied a variety of assembly improvement techniques, creating an assembly of 2.86 billion base pairs that has multiple improvements over previous assemblies: it is more complete, covering more of the genome; thousands of gaps have been closed; many erroneous inversions, deletions, and translocations have been corrected; and thousands of single-nucleotide errors have been corrected. Our evaluation using independent metrics demonstrates that the resulting assembly is substantially more accurate and complete than alternative versions.
CONCLUSIONS: By using independent mapping data and conserved synteny between the cow and human genomes, we were able to construct an assembly with excellent large-scale contiguity in which a large majority (approximately 91%) of the genome has been placed onto the 30 B. taurus chromosomes. We constructed a new cow-human synteny map that expands upon previous maps. We also identified for the first time a portion of the B. taurus Y chromosome.
ESTHER : Zimin_2009_Genome.Biol_10_R42
PubMedSearch : Zimin_2009_Genome.Biol_10_R42
PubMedID: 19393038
Gene_locus related to this paper: bovin-1lipg , bovin-ABHD16A , bovin-e1ba50 , bovin-e1bbv2 , bovin-e1bkm2 , bovin-e1bnq0 , bovin-e1bnt1 , bovin-e1bpw3 , bovin-f1mcd9 , bovin-f1mps6 , bovin-f1msa3 , bovin-f1n110 , bovin-f1n385 , bovin-hslip , bovin-KANSL3 , bovin-ndrg2 , bovin-q0vck8 , bovin-q2kix6 , bovin-q2ta14 , bovin-q3sz73 , bovin-q3sz79 , bovin-f1n673 , bovin-e1bll5 , bovin-g5e5g5 , bovin-g5e5i3 , bovin-e1bjq9 , bovin-f1mc21 , bovin-a0a3q1nm09 , bovin-a7mb66

Title : Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax - Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Adams JH , Silva JC , Bidwell SL , Lorenzi H , Caler E , Crabtree J , Angiuoli SV , Merino EF , Amedeo P , Cheng Q , Coulson RM , Crabb BS , Del Portillo HA , Essien K , Feldblyum TV , Fernandez-Becerra C , Gilson PR , Gueye AH , Guo X , Kang'a S , Kooij TW , Korsinczky M , Meyer EV , Nene V , Paulsen I , White O , Ralph SA , Ren Q , Sargeant TJ , Salzberg SL , Stoeckert CJ , Sullivan SA , Yamamoto MM , Hoffman SL , Wortman JR , Gardner MJ , Galinski MR , Barnwell JW , Fraser-Liggett CM
Ref : Nature , 455 :757 , 2008
Abstract : The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the approximately 515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often causes relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated continuously in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We sequenced the genome of P. vivax to shed light on its distinctive biological features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternative invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance investigation into this neglected species.
ESTHER : Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
PubMedID: 18843361
Gene_locus related to this paper: plakh-b3lb44 , plavi-a5kcq0 , plavs-a5k2k6 , plavs-a5k3z4 , plavs-a5k4s6 , plavs-a5k5e4 , plavs-a5k7t5 , plavs-a5k686 , plavs-a5kaa1 , plavs-a5kaa3 , plavs-a5kas6 , plavs-a5kcm2

Title : Genome sequence and rapid evolution of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A - Salzberg_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_204
Author(s) : Salzberg SL , Sommer DD , Schatz MC , Phillippy AM , Rabinowicz PD , Tsuge S , Furutani A , Ochiai H , Delcher AL , Kelley D , Madupu R , Puiu D , Radune D , Shumway M , Trapnell C , Aparna G , Jha G , Pandey A , Patil PB , Ishihara H , Meyer DF , Szurek B , Verdier V , Koebnik R , Dow JM , Ryan RP , Hirata H , Tsuyumu S , Won Lee S , Seo YS , Sriariyanum M , Ronald PC , Sonti RV , Van Sluys MA , Leach JE , White FF , Bogdanove AJ
Ref : BMC Genomics , 9 :204 , 2008
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major disease that constrains production of this staple crop in many parts of the world. We report here on the complete genome sequence of strain PXO99A and its comparison to two previously sequenced strains, KACC10331 and MAFF311018, which are highly similar to one another. RESULTS: The PXO99A genome is a single circular chromosome of 5,240,075 bp, considerably longer than the genomes of the other strains (4,941,439 bp and 4,940,217 bp, respectively), and it contains 5083 protein-coding genes, including 87 not found in KACC10331 or MAFF311018. PXO99A contains a greater number of virulence-associated transcription activator-like effector genes and has at least ten major chromosomal rearrangements relative to KACC10331 and MAFF311018. PXO99A contains numerous copies of diverse insertion sequence elements, members of which are associated with 7 out of 10 of the major rearrangements. A rapidly-evolving CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats) region contains evidence of dozens of phage infections unique to the PXO99A lineage. PXO99A also contains a unique, near-perfect tandem repeat of 212 kilobases close to the replication terminus. CONCLUSION: Our results provide striking evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for strain-specific adaptations of this pathogen that help to explain the extraordinary diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae genotypes and races that have been isolated from around the world.
ESTHER : Salzberg_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_204
PubMedSearch : Salzberg_2008_BMC.Genomics_9_204
PubMedID: 18452608
Gene_locus related to this paper: xanax-GAA , xanax-PTRB , xanax-XAC0628 , xanax-XAC0736 , xanax-XAC1713 , xanca-impep , xanca-XCC1105 , xanor-acvB , xanor-bioh , xanor-metx , xanor-q5gu74 , xanor-q5gvh6 , xanor-q5gy36 , xanor-q5gy47 , xanor-q5gz98 , xanor-q5h3e8 , xanor-q5h5n1 , xanor-q5h5w8 , xanor-q5h5x9 , xanor-q5h236 , xanor-Q93M73 , xanop-a0a0k0gpc4

Title : Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis - Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Hirt RP , Silva JC , Delcher AL , Schatz M , Zhao Q , Wortman JR , Bidwell SL , Alsmark UC , Besteiro S , Sicheritz-Ponten T , Noel CJ , Dacks JB , Foster PG , Simillion C , Van de Peer Y , Miranda-Saavedra D , Barton GJ , Westrop GD , Muller S , Dessi D , Fiori PL , Ren Q , Paulsen I , Zhang H , Bastida-Corcuera FD , Simoes-Barbosa A , Brown MT , Hayes RD , Mukherjee M , Okumura CY , Schneider R , Smith AJ , Vanacova S , Villalvazo M , Haas BJ , Pertea M , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Shu CL , Osoegawa K , de Jong PJ , Hrdy I , Horvathova L , Zubacova Z , Dolezal P , Malik SB , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Henze K , Gupta A , Wang CC , Dunne RL , Upcroft JA , Upcroft P , White O , Salzberg SL , Tang P , Chiu CH , Lee YS , Embley TM , Coombs GH , Mottram JC , Tachezy J , Fraser-Liggett CM , Johnson PJ
Ref : Science , 315 :207 , 2007
Abstract : We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the approximately 160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion, in conjunction with the shaping of metabolic pathways that likely transpired through lateral gene transfer from bacteria, and amplification of specific gene families implicated in pathogenesis and phagocytosis of host proteins may exemplify adaptations of the parasite during its transition to a urogenital environment. The genome sequence predicts previously unknown functions for the hydrogenosome, which support a common evolutionary origin of this unusual organelle with mitochondria.
ESTHER : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedID: 17218520
Gene_locus related to this paper: triva-a2d7i4 , triva-a2d9w5 , triva-a2d766 , triva-a2dah5 , triva-a2dlx9 , triva-a2dul1 , triva-a2dy49 , triva-a2e6h5 , triva-a2e7p9 , triva-a2e9l3 , triva-a2e414 , triva-a2e613 , triva-a2e983 , triva-a2eau8 , triva-a2ekb9 , triva-a2en58 , triva-a2erp5 , triva-a2et59 , triva-a2f7u4 , triva-a2f801 , triva-a2fa76 , triva-a2fbq3 , triva-a2fe47 , triva-a2fgl0 , triva-a2fhp7 , triva-a2fie6 , triva-a2fk22 , triva-a2fla2 , triva-a2fqm0 , triva-a2fqq2 , triva-a2frq0 , triva-a2frr3 , triva-a2fsq9 , triva-a2fsz5 , triva-a2fux4 , triva-a2fz57 , triva-a2g2h0 , triva-a2g9x0 , triva-a2fqi4

Title : Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny - Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
Author(s) : Clark AG , Eisen MB , Smith DR , Bergman CM , Oliver B , Markow TA , Kaufman TC , Kellis M , Gelbart W , Iyer VN , Pollard DA , Sackton TB , Larracuente AM , Singh ND , Abad JP , Abt DN , Adryan B , Aguade M , Akashi H , Anderson WW , Aquadro CF , Ardell DH , Arguello R , Artieri CG , Barbash DA , Barker D , Barsanti P , Batterham P , Batzoglou S , Begun D , Bhutkar A , Blanco E , Bosak SA , Bradley RK , Brand AD , Brent MR , Brooks AN , Brown RH , Butlin RK , Caggese C , Calvi BR , Bernardo de Carvalho A , Caspi A , Castrezana S , Celniker SE , Chang JL , Chapple C , Chatterji S , Chinwalla A , Civetta A , Clifton SW , Comeron JM , Costello JC , Coyne JA , Daub J , David RG , Delcher AL , Delehaunty K , Do CB , Ebling H , Edwards K , Eickbush T , Evans JD , Filipski A , Findeiss S , Freyhult E , Fulton L , Fulton R , Garcia AC , Gardiner A , Garfield DA , Garvin BE , Gibson G , Gilbert D , Gnerre S , Godfrey J , Good R , Gotea V , Gravely B , Greenberg AJ , Griffiths-Jones S , Gross S , Guigo R , Gustafson EA , Haerty W , Hahn MW , Halligan DL , Halpern AL , Halter GM , Han MV , Heger A , Hillier L , Hinrichs AS , Holmes I , Hoskins RA , Hubisz MJ , Hultmark D , Huntley MA , Jaffe DB , Jagadeeshan S , Jeck WR , Johnson J , Jones CD , Jordan WC , Karpen GH , Kataoka E , Keightley PD , Kheradpour P , Kirkness EF , Koerich LB , Kristiansen K , Kudrna D , Kulathinal RJ , Kumar S , Kwok R , Lander E , Langley CH , Lapoint R , Lazzaro BP , Lee SJ , Levesque L , Li R , Lin CF , Lin MF , Lindblad-Toh K , Llopart A , Long M , Low L , Lozovsky E , Lu J , Luo M , Machado CA , Makalowski W , Marzo M , Matsuda M , Matzkin L , McAllister B , McBride CS , McKernan B , McKernan K , Mendez-Lago M , Minx P , Mollenhauer MU , Montooth K , Mount SM , Mu X , Myers E , Negre B , Newfeld S , Nielsen R , Noor MA , O'Grady P , Pachter L , Papaceit M , Parisi MJ , Parisi M , Parts L , Pedersen JS , Pesole G , Phillippy AM , Ponting CP , Pop M , Porcelli D , Powell JR , Prohaska S , Pruitt K , Puig M , Quesneville H , Ram KR , Rand D , Rasmussen MD , Reed LK , Reenan R , Reily A , Remington KA , Rieger TT , Ritchie MG , Robin C , Rogers YH , Rohde C , Rozas J , Rubenfield MJ , Ruiz A , Russo S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez-Gracia A , Saranga DJ , Sato H , Schaeffer SW , Schatz MC , Schlenke T , Schwartz R , Segarra C , Singh RS , Sirot L , Sirota M , Sisneros NB , Smith CD , Smith TF , Spieth J , Stage DE , Stark A , Stephan W , Strausberg RL , Strempel S , Sturgill D , Sutton G , Sutton GG , Tao W , Teichmann S , Tobari YN , Tomimura Y , Tsolas JM , Valente VL , Venter E , Venter JC , Vicario S , Vieira FG , Vilella AJ , Villasante A , Walenz B , Wang J , Wasserman M , Watts T , Wilson D , Wilson RK , Wing RA , Wolfner MF , Wong A , Wong GK , Wu CI , Wu G , Yamamoto D , Yang HP , Yang SP , Yorke JA , Yoshida K , Zdobnov E , Zhang P , Zhang Y , Zimin AV , Baldwin J , Abdouelleil A , Abdulkadir J , Abebe A , Abera B , Abreu J , Acer SC , Aftuck L , Alexander A , An P , Anderson E , Anderson S , Arachi H , Azer M , Bachantsang P , Barry A , Bayul T , Berlin A , Bessette D , Bloom T , Blye J , Boguslavskiy L , Bonnet C , Boukhgalter B , Bourzgui I , Brown A , Cahill P , Channer S , Cheshatsang Y , Chuda L , Citroen M , Collymore A , Cooke P , Costello M , D'Aco K , Daza R , De Haan G , DeGray S , DeMaso C , Dhargay N , Dooley K , Dooley E , Doricent M , Dorje P , Dorjee K , Dupes A , Elong R , Falk J , Farina A , Faro S , Ferguson D , Fisher S , Foley CD , Franke A , Friedrich D , Gadbois L , Gearin G , Gearin CR , Giannoukos G , Goode T , Graham J , Grandbois E , Grewal S , Gyaltsen K , Hafez N , Hagos B , Hall J , Henson C , Hollinger A , Honan T , Huard MD , Hughes L , Hurhula B , Husby ME , Kamat A , Kanga B , Kashin S , Khazanovich D , Kisner P , Lance K , Lara M , Lee W , Lennon N , Letendre F , LeVine R , Lipovsky A , Liu X , Liu J , Liu S , Lokyitsang T , Lokyitsang Y , Lubonja R , Lui A , Macdonald P , Magnisalis V , Maru K , Matthews C , McCusker W , McDonough S , Mehta T , Meldrim J , Meneus L , Mihai O , Mihalev A , Mihova T , Mittelman R , Mlenga V , Montmayeur A , Mulrain L , Navidi A , Naylor J , Negash T , Nguyen T , Nguyen N , Nicol R , Norbu C , Norbu N , Novod N , O'Neill B , Osman S , Markiewicz E , Oyono OL , Patti C , Phunkhang P , Pierre F , Priest M , Raghuraman S , Rege F , Reyes R , Rise C , Rogov P , Ross K , Ryan E , Settipalli S , Shea T , Sherpa N , Shi L , Shih D , Sparrow T , Spaulding J , Stalker J , Stange-Thomann N , Stavropoulos S , Stone C , Strader C , Tesfaye S , Thomson T , Thoulutsang Y , Thoulutsang D , Topham K , Topping I , Tsamla T , Vassiliev H , Vo A , Wangchuk T , Wangdi T , Weiand M , Wilkinson J , Wilson A , Yadav S , Young G , Yu Q , Zembek L , Zhong D , Zimmer A , Zwirko Z , Alvarez P , Brockman W , Butler J , Chin C , Grabherr M , Kleber M , Mauceli E , MacCallum I
Ref : Nature , 450 :203 , 2007
Abstract : Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.
ESTHER : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedSearch : Clark_2007_Nature_450_203
PubMedID: 17994087
Gene_locus related to this paper: droan-ACHE , droan-b3lx10 , droan-b3lx75 , droan-b3lxv7 , droan-b3ly87 , droan-b3lyh4 , droan-b3lyh5 , droan-b3lyh7 , droan-b3lyh9 , droan-b3lyi0 , droan-b3lyi2 , droan-b3lyi3 , droan-b3lyi4 , droan-b3lyj8 , droan-b3lyj9 , droan-b3lyx4 , droan-b3lyx5 , droan-b3lyx6 , droan-b3lyx7 , droan-b3lyx9 , droan-b3lz72 , droan-b3m1x3 , droan-b3m2d4 , droan-b3m3d9 , droan-b3m4e3 , droan-b3m5w1 , droan-b3m6i7 , droan-b3m7v2 , droan-b3m9a5 , droan-b3m9f4 , droan-b3m9p3 , droan-b3m254 , droan-b3m259 , droan-b3m260 , droan-b3m262 , droan-b3m524 , droan-b3m635 , droan-b3m845 , droan-b3m846 , droan-b3md01 , droan-b3mdh7 , droan-b3mdm6 , droan-b3mdw8 , droan-b3mee1 , droan-b3mf47 , droan-b3mf48 , droan-b3mg94 , droan-b3mgk2 , droan-b3mgn6 , droan-b3mii3 , droan-b3mjk2 , droan-b3mjk3 , droan-b3mjk4 , droan-b3mjk5 , droan-b3mjl2 , droan-b3mjl4 , droan-b3mjl7 , droan-b3mjl9 , droan-b3mjm8 , droan-b3mjm9 , droan-b3mjs6 , droan-b3mkr0 , droan-b3ml20 , droan-b3mly4 , droan-b3mly5 , droan-b3mly6 , droan-b3mmm8 , droan-b3mnb5 , droan-b3mny9 , droan-b3mtj5 , droan-b3muw4 , droan-b3muw8 , droan-b3n0e7 , droan-b3n2j7 , droan-b3n247 , droan-c5idb2 , droer-ACHE , droer-b3n5c7 , droer-b3n5d0 , droer-b3n5d8 , droer-b3n5d9 , droer-b3n5t7 , droer-b3n5y4 , droer-b3n7d2 , droer-b3n7d3 , droer-b3n7d4 , droer-b3n7k8 , droer-b3n8e4 , droer-b3n8f7 , droer-b3n8f8 , droer-b3n9e1 , droer-b3n319 , droer-b3n547 , droer-b3n549 , droer-b3n558 , droer-b3n560 , droer-b3n577 , droer-b3n612 , droer-b3nar5 , droer-b3nb91 , droer-b3nct9 , droer-b3nd53 , droer-b3ndh9 , droer-b3ndq8 , droer-b3ne66 , droer-b3ne67 , droer-b3ne97 , droer-b3nfk3 , droer-b3nfq9 , droer-b3nim7 , droer-b3nkn2 , droer-b3nm11 , droer-b3nmh4 , droer-b3nmy2 , droer-b3npx2 , droer-b3npx3 , droer-b3nq76 , droer-b3nqg9 , droer-b3nqm8 , droer-b3nr28 , droer-b3nrd3 , droer-b3nst4 , droer-b3nwa7 , droer-b3nyp5.1 , droer-b3nyp5.2 , droer-b3nyp6 , droer-b3nyp7 , droer-b3nyp8 , droer-b3nyp9 , droer-b3nyq3 , droer-b3nz06 , droer-b3nz14 , droer-b3nzj0 , droer-b3p0c0 , droer-b3p0c1 , droer-b3p0c2 , droer-b3p2x6 , droer-b3p2x7 , droer-b3p2x9 , droer-b3p2y1 , droer-b3p2y2 , droer-b3p6d4 , droer-b3p6d5 , droer-b3p6w3 , droer-b3p7b4 , droer-b3p7h9 , droer-b3p152 , droer-b3p486 , droer-b3p487 , droer-b3p488 , droer-b3p489 , droer-EST6 , droer-q670j5 , drogr-ACHE , drogr-b4iwp3 , drogr-b4iww3 , drogr-b4iwy3 , drogr-b4ixf7 , drogr-b4ixh4 , drogr-b4iyz5 , drogr-b4j2s2 , drogr-b4j2u8 , drogr-b4j3u1 , drogr-b4j3v3 , drogr-b4j4g7 , drogr-b4j4x9 , drogr-b4j6e6 , drogr-b4j9c9 , drogr-b4j9y4 , drogr-b4j156 , drogr-b4j384 , drogr-b4j605 , drogr-b4j685 , drogr-b4ja76 , drogr-b4jay5 , drogr-b4jcf0 , drogr-b4jcf1 , drogr-b4jdg6 , drogr-b4jdg7 , drogr-b4jdh6 , drogr-b4jdz1 , drogr-b4jdz2 , drogr-b4jdz4 , drogr-b4je66 , drogr-b4je79 , drogr-b4je82 , drogr-b4je88 , drogr-b4je89 , drogr-b4je90 , drogr-b4je91 , drogr-b4jf76 , drogr-b4jf79 , drogr-b4jf80 , drogr-b4jf81 , drogr-b4jf82 , drogr-b4jf83 , drogr-b4jf84 , drogr-b4jf85 , drogr-b4jf87 , drogr-b4jf91 , drogr-b4jf92 , drogr-b4jg66 , drogr-b4jgh0 , drogr-b4jgh1 , drogr-b4jgr9 , drogr-b4ji67 , drogr-b4jls2 , drogr-b4jnh9 , drogr-b4jpc6 , drogr-b4jpq3 , drogr-b4jpx9 , drogr-b4jql2 , drogr-b4jrh5 , drogr-b4jsb2 , drogr-b4jth3 , drogr-b4jti1 , drogr-b4jul5 , drogr-b4jur4 , drogr-b4jvh3 , drogr-b4jz00 , drogr-b4jz03 , drogr-b4jz04 , drogr-b4jz05 , drogr-b4jzh2 , drogr-b4k0u2 , drogr-b4k2r1 , drogr-b4k234 , drogr-b4k235 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG11626 , drome-GH02439 , dromo-ACHE , dromo-b4k6a7 , dromo-b4k6a8 , dromo-b4k6q8 , dromo-b4k6q9 , dromo-b4k6r1 , dromo-b4k6r3 , dromo-b4k6r4 , dromo-b4k6r5 , dromo-b4k6r6 , dromo-b4k6r7 , dromo-b4k6r8 , dromo-b4k6r9 , dromo-b4k6s0 , dromo-b4k6s1 , dromo-b4k6s2 , dromo-b4k9c7 , dromo-b4k9d3 , dromo-b4k571 , dromo-b4k721 , dromo-b4ka74 , dromo-b4ka89 , dromo-b4kaj4 , dromo-b4kc20 , dromo-b4kcl2 , dromo-b4kcl3 , dromo-b4kd55.1 , dromo-b4kd55.2 , dromo-b4kd56 , dromo-b4kd57 , dromo-b4kde1 , dromo-b4kdg2 , dromo-b4kdh4 , dromo-b4kdh5 , dromo-b4kdh6 , dromo-A0A0Q9XDF2 , dromo-b4kdh8.1 , dromo-b4kdh8.2 , dromo-b4kg04 , dromo-b4kg05 , dromo-b4kg06 , dromo-b4kg16 , dromo-b4kg44 , dromo-b4kg90 , dromo-b4kh20 , dromo-b4kh21 , dromo-b4kht7 , dromo-b4kid3 , dromo-b4kik0 , dromo-b4kjx0 , dromo-b4kki1 , dromo-b4kkp6 , dromo-b4kkp8 , dromo-b4kkq8 , dromo-b4kkr0 , dromo-b4kkr3 , dromo-b4kkr4 , dromo-b4kks0 , dromo-b4kks1 , dromo-b4kks2 , dromo-b4kla1 , dromo-b4klv8 , dromo-b4knt4 , dromo-b4kp08 , dromo-b4kp16 , dromo-b4kqa6 , dromo-b4kqa7 , dromo-b4kqa8 , dromo-b4kqh1 , dromo-b4kst4 , dromo-b4ksy6 , dromo-b4kt84 , dromo-b4ktf5 , dromo-b4ktf6 , dromo-b4kvl3 , dromo-b4kvw2 , dromo-b4kwv4 , dromo-b4kwv5 , dromo-b4kxz6 , dromo-b4ky12 , dromo-b4ky36 , dromo-b4ky44 , dromo-b4kzu7 , dromo-b4l0n8 , dromo-b4l4u5 , dromo-b4l6l9 , dromo-b4l084 , drope-ACHE , drope-b4g3s6 , drope-b4g4p7 , drope-b4g6v4 , drope-b4g8m0 , drope-b4g8n6 , drope-b4g8n7 , drope-b4g9p2 , drope-b4g815 , drope-b4g816 , drope-b4gat7 , drope-b4gav5 , drope-b4gb05 , drope-b4gc08 , drope-b4gcr3 , drope-b4gdk2 , drope-b4gdl9 , drope-b4gdv9 , drope-b4gei8 , drope-b4gei9 , drope-b4gej0 , drope-b4ghz9 , drope-b4gj62 , drope-b4gj64 , drope-b4gj74 , drope-b4gkf4 , drope-b4gkv2 , drope-b4gky9 , drope-b4gl76 , drope-b4glf3 , drope-b4gmt3 , drope-b4gmt7 , drope-b4gmt9 , drope-b4gmu2 , drope-b4gmu3 , drope-b4gmu4 , drope-b4gmu5 , drope-b4gmu6 , drope-b4gmu7 , drope-b4gmv1 , drope-b4gn08 , drope-b4gpa7 , drope-b4gq13 , drope-b4grh7 , drope-b4gsf9 , drope-b4gsw4 , drope-b4gsw5 , drope-b4gsx2 , drope-b4gsx7 , drope-b4gsy6 , drope-b4gsy7 , drope-b4guj8 , drope-b4gw36 , drope-b4gzc2 , drope-b4gzc6 , drope-b4gzc7 , drope-b4h4p9 , drope-b4h5l3 , drope-b4h6a0 , drope-b4h6a8 , drope-b4h6a9 , drope-b4h6b0 , drope-b4h7m7 , drope-b4h462 , drope-b4h601 , drope-b4h602 , drope-b4hay1 , drope-b4hb18 , drope-est5a , drope-est5b , drope-est5c , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p4 , drose-b4he97 , drose-b4hfu2 , drose-b4hg54 , drose-b4hga0 , drose-b4hgu9 , drose-b4hgv0 , drose-b4hgv3 , drose-b4hgv4 , drose-b4hhm8 , drose-b4hhs6 , drose-b4hie4 , drose-b4him9 , drose-b4hk63 , drose-b4hkj5 , drose-b4hr07 , drose-b4hr81 , drose-b4hre7 , drose-b4hs13 , drose-b4hsj9 , drose-b4hsk0 , drose-b4hsm8 , drose-b4hvr5 , drose-b4hwr7 , drose-b4hwr8 , drose-b4hwr9 , drose-b4hws6 , drose-b4hws7 , drose-b4hwt0 , drose-b4hwt2 , drose-b4hwu1 , drose-b4hwu2 , drose-b4hxs9 , drose-b4hxu4 , drose-b4hxz1 , drose-b4hyp8 , drose-b4hyp9 , drose-b4hyq0 , drose-b4hyz4 , drose-b4hyz5 , drose-b4i1k8 , drose-b4i2f3 , drose-b4i2w5 , drose-b4i4u3 , drose-b4i4u7 , drose-b4i4u9 , drose-b4i4v0 , drose-b4i4v1 , drose-b4i4v4 , drose-b4i4v5 , drose-b4i4v6 , drose-b4i4v7 , drose-b4i4v8 , drose-b4i4w0 , drose-b4i7s6 , drose-b4i133 , drose-b4i857 , drose-b4iam7 , drose-b4iam9 , drose-b4iaq6 , drose-b4icf6 , drose-b4icf7 , drose-b4id80 , drose-b4ifc5 , drose-b4ihv9 , drose-b4iie9 , drose-b4ilj8 , drose-b4in13 , drose-b4inj9 , drosi-ACHE , drosi-aes04a , drosi-b4nsh8 , drosi-b4q3d7 , drosi-b4q4w5 , drosi-b4q4y7 , drosi-b4q6h6 , drosi-b4q7u2 , drosi-b4q7u3 , drosi-b4q9c6 , drosi-b4q9c7 , drosi-b4q9d3 , drosi-b4q9d4 , drosi-b4q9r0 , drosi-b4q9r1 , drosi-b4q9r3 , drosi-b4q9s2 , drosi-b4q9s3 , drosi-b4q429 , drosi-b4q530 , drosi-b4q734 , drosi-b4q782 , drosi-b4q783 , drosi-b4q942 , drosi-b4qet1 , drosi-b4qfv6 , drosi-b4qge5 , drosi-b4qgh5 , drosi-b4qgs5 , drosi-b4qhf3 , drosi-b4qhf4 , drosi-b4qhi5 , drosi-b4qjr2 , drosi-b4qjr3 , drosi-b4qjv6 , drosi-b4qk23 , drosi-b4qk51 , drosi-b4qlt1 , drosi-b4qlz9 , drosi-b4qmn9 , drosi-b4qrq7 , drosi-b4qs01 , drosi-b4qs57 , drosi-b4qs82 , drosi-b4qs83 , drosi-b4qs84 , drosi-b4qs85 , drosi-b4qs86 , drosi-b4qsq1 , drosi-b4quk6 , drosi-b4qvg5 , drosi-b4qvg6 , drosi-b4qzn2 , drosi-b4qzn3 , drosi-b4qzn5 , drosi-b4qzn7 , drosi-b4qzn8 , drosi-b4qzp2 , drosi-b4qzp3 , drosi-b4qzp4 , drosi-b4qzp5 , drosi-b4qzp6 , drosi-b4qzp7 , drosi-b4r1a4 , drosi-b4r025 , drosi-b4r207 , drosi-b4r662 , drosi-este6 , drosi-q670k8 , drovi-ACHE , drovi-b4lev2 , drovi-b4lf33 , drovi-b4lf51 , drovi-b4lg54 , drovi-b4lg72 , drovi-b4lgc6 , drovi-b4lgd5 , drovi-b4lgg0 , drovi-b4lgk5 , drovi-b4lgn2 , drovi-b4lh17 , drovi-b4lh18 , drovi-b4lk43 , drovi-b4ll59 , drovi-b4ll60 , drovi-b4llm5 , drovi-b4lln3 , drovi-b4lmk4 , drovi-b4lmp0 , drovi-b4lnr4 , drovi-b4lp47 , drovi-b4lpd0 , drovi-b4lps0 , drovi-b4lqc6 , drovi-b4lr00 , drovi-b4lrp6 , drovi-b4lrw2 , drovi-b4lse7 , drovi-b4lse9 , drovi-b4lsf0 , drovi-b4lsn0 , drovi-b4lsq5 , drovi-b4lt32 , drovi-b4ltr1 , drovi-b4lui7 , drovi-b4lui9 , drovi-b4luj8 , drovi-b4luk0 , drovi-b4luk3 , drovi-b4luk8 , drovi-b4luk9 , drovi-b4lul0 , drovi-b4lve2 , drovi-b4lxi9 , drovi-b4lxj8 , drovi-b4lyf3 , drovi-b4lyq2 , drovi-b4lyq3 , drovi-b4lz07 , drovi-b4lz13 , drovi-b4lz14 , drovi-b4lz15 , drovi-b4m0j7 , drovi-b4m0s0 , drovi-b4m2b6 , drovi-b4m4h7 , drovi-b4m4h8 , drovi-b4m4i0 , drovi-b4m4i2 , drovi-b4m4i3.A , drovi-b4m4i3.B , drovi-b4m4i4 , drovi-b4m4i5 , drovi-b4m4i6 , drovi-b4m4i7 , drovi-b4m4i8 , drovi-b4m4i9 , drovi-b4m4j2 , drovi-b4m5a0 , drovi-b4m5a1 , drovi-b4m5a2 , drovi-b4m6b9 , drovi-b4m7k9 , drovi-b4m9g9 , drovi-b4m9h0 , drovi-b4m564 , drovi-b4m599 , drovi-b4m918 , drovi-b4mb87 , drovi-b4mc71 , drovi-b4mfa4 , drowi-ACHE , drowi-b4mjb9 , drowi-b4mkt7 , drowi-b4mlc1 , drowi-b4mp68 , drowi-b4mqe9 , drowi-b4mqf0.2 , drowi-b4mqf1 , drowi-b4mqf3 , drowi-b4mqf4 , drowi-b4mqf5 , drowi-b4mqq6 , drowi-b4mrd1 , drowi-b4mrk3 , drowi-b4mtl5 , drowi-b4mug2 , drowi-b4muj8 , drowi-b4mv18 , drowi-b4mw32 , drowi-b4mw85 , drowi-b4mwp2 , drowi-b4mwp6 , drowi-b4mwq5 , drowi-b4mwr0 , drowi-b4mwr8 , drowi-b4mwr9 , drowi-b4mwt1 , drowi-b4mwz7 , drowi-b4mxn5 , drowi-b4my54 , drowi-b4myg1 , drowi-b4myh5 , drowi-b4n0d4 , drowi-b4n1a7 , drowi-b4n1c8 , drowi-b4n3s9 , drowi-b4n3x7 , drowi-b4n4x9 , drowi-b4n4y0 , drowi-b4n6m1 , drowi-b4n6n0 , drowi-b4n6n7 , drowi-b4n6u6 , drowi-b4n7s6 , drowi-b4n7s7 , drowi-b4n7s8 , drowi-b4n899.1 , drowi-b4n8a1 , drowi-b4n8a2 , drowi-b4n8a3 , drowi-b4n8a4 , drowi-b4n8a9 , drowi-b4n023 , drowi-b4n075 , drowi-b4n543 , drowi-b4n888 , drowi-b4n889 , drowi-b4n891 , drowi-b4n893 , drowi-b4n895 , drowi-b4n897 , drowi-b4n898 , drowi-b4n899.2 , drowi-b4nae3 , drowi-b4ner8 , drowi-b4ng76 , drowi-b4nga7 , drowi-b4ngb5 , drowi-b4nhz9 , drowi-b4nj18 , drowi-b4nj19 , drowi-b4nja7 , drowi-b4nja8 , drowi-b4nja9 , drowi-b4njk8 , drowi-b4nkc8 , drowi-b4nky0 , drowi-b4nl36 , drowi-b4nm27 , drowi-b4nn59 , drowi-b4nnc1 , drowi-b4nng1 , drowi-b4nng2 , droya-ACHE , droya-aes04 , droya-b4itg2 , droya-b4itg6 , droya-b4itu9 , droya-b4iuv4 , droya-b4iuv5 , droya-b4nxe6 , droya-b4nxg5 , droya-b4nxg6 , droya-b4nxg8 , droya-b4nxw4 , droya-b4ny57 , droya-b4ny58 , droya-b4ny86 , droya-b4nzz8 , droya-b4p0b5 , droya-b4p0q9 , droya-b4p0r0 , droya-b4p0r7 , droya-b4p0r8 , droya-b4p0r9 , droya-b4p0s0 , droya-b4p0s2 , droya-b4p0t0 , droya-b4p0t1 , droya-b4p3h4 , droya-b4p3x8 , droya-b4p5g8 , droya-b4p6c9 , droya-b4p6l9 , droya-b4p6r1 , droya-b4p6r2 , droya-b4p7u4 , droya-b4p8w7 , droya-b4p023 , droya-b4p241 , droya-b4p774 , droya-b4pat9 , droya-b4pbl1 , droya-b4pd22 , droya-b4pd70 , droya-b4pdm8 , droya-b4pet9 , droya-b4pff9 , droya-b4pga7 , droya-b4pgu0 , droya-b4pig3 , droya-b4pjt8 , droya-b4pka2 , droya-b4plh2 , droya-b4pma3 , droya-b4pmv3 , droya-b4pmv4 , droya-b4pmv5 , droya-b4pn92 , droya-b4pp65 , droya-b4ppc5 , droya-b4ppc6 , droya-b4ppc7 , droya-b4ppc8 , droya-b4pq03 , droya-b4prg6B , droya-b4prg9 , droya-b4prh3 , droya-b4prh4 , droya-b4prh6 , droya-b4prh7 , droya-b4psz8 , droya-b4psz9 , droya-b4pv22 , droya-b4q0g5 , droya-b4q246 , droya-EST6 , droya-q71d76 , drowi-b4n7m9 , drope-b4gkk1 , droer-b3n5s3 , drose-b4i1w5 , drowi-a0a0q9x0t3 , drogr-b4jvm7 , dromo-b4ku70 , drovi-b4mcn9 , drovi-b4lty2 , drogr-b4jdu1 , drovi-a0a0q9wiq8 , dromo-b4kf70 , drosi-b2zi86 , droya-b4p2y4 , drose-b2zic5 , droer-b3n895

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49

Title : Draft genome of the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi - Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
Author(s) : Ghedin E , Wang S , Spiro D , Caler E , Zhao Q , Crabtree J , Allen JE , Delcher AL , Guiliano DB , Miranda-Saavedra D , Angiuoli SV , Creasy T , Amedeo P , Haas B , El-Sayed NM , Wortman JR , Feldblyum T , Tallon L , Schatz M , Shumway M , Koo H , Salzberg SL , Schobel S , Pertea M , Pop M , White O , Barton GJ , Carlow CK , Crawford MJ , Daub J , Dimmic MW , Estes CF , Foster JM , Ganatra M , Gregory WF , Johnson NM , Jin J , Komuniecki R , Korf I , Kumar S , Laney S , Li BW , Li W , Lindblom TH , Lustigman S , Ma D , Maina CV , Martin DM , McCarter JP , McReynolds L , Mitreva M , Nutman TB , Parkinson J , Peregrin-Alvarez JM , Poole C , Ren Q , Saunders L , Sluder AE , Smith K , Stanke M , Unnasch TR , Ware J , Wei AD , Weil G , Williams DJ , Zhang Y , Williams SA , Fraser-Liggett C , Slatko B , Blaxter ML , Scott AL
Ref : Science , 317 :1756 , 2007
Abstract : Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the approximately 90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict approximately 11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during approximately 350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.
ESTHER : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedSearch : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedID: 17885136
Gene_locus related to this paper: bruma-a8ndk6 , bruma-a8njt8 , bruma-a8nl88 , bruma-a8npi4 , bruma-a8npi6 , bruma-a8p6g9 , bruma-a8pah3 , bruma-a8pc38 , bruma-a8pek5 , bruma-a8piq4 , bruma-a8pnw8 , bruma-a8psu4 , bruma-a8pte1 , bruma-a8q606 , bruma-a8q632 , bruma-a8q937 , bruma-a8qav5 , bruma-a8qbd9 , bruma-a8qgj6 , bruma-a8qh78 , bruma-a8q143 , bruma-a0a024mej5 , bruma-a0a0k0jju9 , bruma-a0a0i9n517

Title : Macronuclear genome sequence of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a model eukaryote - Eisen_2006_PLoS.Biol_4_e286
Author(s) : Eisen JA , Coyne RS , Wu M , Wu D , Thiagarajan M , Wortman JR , Badger JH , Ren Q , Amedeo P , Jones KM , Tallon LJ , Delcher AL , Salzberg SL , Silva JC , Haas BJ , Majoros WH , Farzad M , Carlton JM , Smith RK, Jr. , Garg J , Pearlman RE , Karrer KM , Sun L , Manning G , Elde NC , Turkewitz AP , Asai DJ , Wilkes DE , Wang Y , Cai H , Collins K , Stewart BA , Lee SR , Wilamowska K , Weinberg Z , Ruzzo WL , Wloga D , Gaertig J , Frankel J , Tsao CC , Gorovsky MA , Keeling PJ , Waller RF , Patron NJ , Cherry JM , Stover NA , Krieger CJ , del Toro C , Ryder HF , Williamson SC , Barbeau RA , Hamilton EP , Orias E
Ref : PLoS Biol , 4 :e286 , 2006
Abstract : The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is a model organism for molecular and cellular biology. Like other ciliates, this species has separate germline and soma functions that are embodied by distinct nuclei within a single cell. The germline-like micronucleus (MIC) has its genome held in reserve for sexual reproduction. The soma-like macronucleus (MAC), which possesses a genome processed from that of the MIC, is the center of gene expression and does not directly contribute DNA to sexual progeny. We report here the shotgun sequencing, assembly, and analysis of the MAC genome of T. thermophila, which is approximately 104 Mb in length and composed of approximately 225 chromosomes. Overall, the gene set is robust, with more than 27,000 predicted protein-coding genes, 15,000 of which have strong matches to genes in other organisms. The functional diversity encoded by these genes is substantial and reflects the complexity of processes required for a free-living, predatory, single-celled organism. This is highlighted by the abundance of lineage-specific duplications of genes with predicted roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions (e.g., kinases), using diverse resources (e.g., proteases and transporters), and generating structural complexity (e.g., kinesins and dyneins). In contrast to the other lineages of alveolates (apicomplexans and dinoflagellates), no compelling evidence could be found for plastid-derived genes in the genome. UGA, the only T. thermophila stop codon, is used in some genes to encode selenocysteine, thus making this organism the first known with the potential to translate all 64 codons in nuclear genes into amino acids. We present genomic evidence supporting the hypothesis that the excision of DNA from the MIC to generate the MAC specifically targets foreign DNA as a form of genome self-defense. The combination of the genome sequence, the functional diversity encoded therein, and the presence of some pathways missing from other model organisms makes T. thermophila an ideal model for functional genomic studies to address biological, biomedical, and biotechnological questions of fundamental importance.
ESTHER : Eisen_2006_PLoS.Biol_4_e286
PubMedSearch : Eisen_2006_PLoS.Biol_4_e286
PubMedID: 16933976
Gene_locus related to this paper: tetts-i7mam3 , tetts-i7ml33

Title : The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease - El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
Author(s) : El-Sayed NM , Myler PJ , Bartholomeu DC , Nilsson D , Aggarwal G , Tran AN , Ghedin E , Worthey EA , Delcher AL , Blandin G , Westenberger SJ , Caler E , Cerqueira GC , Branche C , Haas B , Anupama A , Arner E , Aslund L , Attipoe P , Bontempi E , Bringaud F , Burton P , Cadag E , Campbell DA , Carrington M , Crabtree J , Darban H , da Silveira JF , de Jong P , Edwards K , Englund PT , Fazelina G , Feldblyum T , Ferella M , Frasch AC , Gull K , Horn D , Hou L , Huang Y , Kindlund E , Klingbeil M , Kluge S , Koo H , Lacerda D , Levin MJ , Lorenzi H , Louie T , Machado CR , McCulloch R , McKenna A , Mizuno Y , Mottram JC , Nelson S , Ochaya S , Osoegawa K , Pai G , Parsons M , Pentony M , Pettersson U , Pop M , Ramirez JL , Rinta J , Robertson L , Salzberg SL , Sanchez DO , Seyler A , Sharma R , Shetty J , Simpson AJ , Sisk E , Tammi MT , Tarleton R , Teixeira S , Van Aken S , Vogt C , Ward PN , Wickstead B , Wortman J , White O , Fraser CM , Stuart KD , Andersson B
Ref : Science , 309 :409 , 2005
Abstract : Whole-genome sequencing of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi revealed that the diploid genome contains a predicted 22,570 proteins encoded by genes, of which 12,570 represent allelic pairs. Over 50% of the genome consists of repeated sequences, such as retrotransposons and genes for large families of surface molecules, which include trans-sialidases, mucins, gp63s, and a large novel family (>1300 copies) of mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) genes. Analyses of the T. cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania major (Tritryp) genomes imply differences from other eukaryotes in DNA repair and initiation of replication and reflect their unusual mitochondrial DNA. Although the Tritryp lack several classes of signaling molecules, their kinomes contain a large and diverse set of protein kinases and phosphatases; their size and diversity imply previously unknown interactions and regulatory processes, which may be targets for intervention.
ESTHER : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedSearch : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedID: 16020725
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4cqq5 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc3 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4czy3 , trycr-q4d1s2 , trycr-q4d2n1 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dab1 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dap7 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dp03 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dry8 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvl8 , trycr-q4dvp1 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2 , trycr-q6y3z8 , trycr-Q94795 , trycr-TCPO

Title : The genome of the basidiomycetous yeast and human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans - Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
Author(s) : Loftus BJ , Fung E , Roncaglia P , Rowley D , Amedeo P , Bruno D , Vamathevan J , Miranda M , Anderson IJ , Fraser JA , Allen JE , Bosdet IE , Brent MR , Chiu R , Doering TL , Donlin MJ , D'Souza CA , Fox DS , Grinberg V , Fu J , Fukushima M , Haas BJ , Huang JC , Janbon G , Jones SJ , Koo HL , Krzywinski MI , Kwon-Chung JK , Lengeler KB , Maiti R , Marra MA , Marra RE , Mathewson CA , Mitchell TG , Pertea M , Riggs FR , Salzberg SL , Schein JE , Shvartsbeyn A , Shin H , Shumway M , Specht CA , Suh BB , Tenney A , Utterback TR , Wickes BL , Wortman JR , Wye NH , Kronstad JW , Lodge JK , Heitman J , Davis RW , Fraser CM , Hyman RW
Ref : Science , 307 :1321 , 2005
Abstract : Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycetous yeast ubiquitous in the environment, a model for fungal pathogenesis, and an opportunistic human pathogen of global importance. We have sequenced its approximately 20-megabase genome, which contains approximately 6500 intron-rich gene structures and encodes a transcriptome abundant in alternatively spliced and antisense messages. The genome is rich in transposons, many of which cluster at candidate centromeric regions. The presence of these transposons may drive karyotype instability and phenotypic variation. C. neoformans encodes unique genes that may contribute to its unusual virulence properties, and comparison of two phenotypically distinct strains reveals variation in gene content in addition to sequence polymorphisms between the genomes.
ESTHER : Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
PubMedSearch : Loftus_2005_Science_307_1321
PubMedID: 15653466
Gene_locus related to this paper: cryne-apth1 , cryne-ppme1 , cryne-q5k7g1 , cryne-q5k7h2 , cryne-q5k7p6 , cryne-q5k8p2 , cryne-q5k8s0 , cryne-q5k9e7 , cryne-q5k9p3 , cryne-q5k9y9 , cryne-q5k721 , cryne-q5k987 , cryne-q5ka03 , cryne-q5ka24 , cryne-q5ka58 , cryne-q5kat4 , cryne-q5kav3 , cryne-q5kbu4 , cryne-q5kbw4 , cryne-q5kc00 , cryne-q5kec5 , cryne-q5kei3 , cryne-q5kei7 , cryne-q5ker2 , cryne-q5key5 , cryne-q5kf48 , cryne-q5kfk6 , cryne-q5kfz0 , cryne-q5kgq3 , cryne-q5kh37 , cryne-q5khb0 , cryne-q5khb9 , cryne-q5kip7 , cryne-q5kiu5 , cryne-q5kj56 , cryne-q5kjf8 , cryne-q5kjh3 , cryne-q5kjp9 , cryne-q5kjw7 , cryne-q5kky1 , cryne-q5kkz7 , cryne-q5kl13 , cryne-q5klu9 , cryne-q5km63 , cryne-q5kme9 , cryne-q5kni1 , cryne-q5knq0 , cryne-q5knr2 , cryne-q5knw0 , cryne-q5kq08 , cryne-Q5KCH9 , cryne-q55ta1 , cryne-q5kjh4 , crynj-q5knp8 , crynj-q5kpe0

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : Comparative genomics of trypanosomatid parasitic protozoa - El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
Author(s) : El-Sayed NM , Myler PJ , Blandin G , Berriman M , Crabtree J , Aggarwal G , Caler E , Renauld H , Worthey EA , Hertz-Fowler C , Ghedin E , Peacock C , Bartholomeu DC , Haas BJ , Tran AN , Wortman JR , Alsmark UC , Angiuoli S , Anupama A , Badger J , Bringaud F , Cadag E , Carlton JM , Cerqueira GC , Creasy T , Delcher AL , Djikeng A , Embley TM , Hauser C , Ivens AC , Kummerfeld SK , Pereira-Leal JB , Nilsson D , Peterson J , Salzberg SL , Shallom J , Silva JC , Sundaram J , Westenberger S , White O , Melville SE , Donelson JE , Andersson B , Stuart KD , Hall N
Ref : Science , 309 :404 , 2005
Abstract : A comparison of gene content and genome architecture of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania major, three related pathogens with different life cycles and disease pathology, revealed a conserved core proteome of about 6200 genes in large syntenic polycistronic gene clusters. Many species-specific genes, especially large surface antigen families, occur at nonsyntenic chromosome-internal and subtelomeric regions. Retroelements, structural RNAs, and gene family expansion are often associated with syntenic discontinuities that-along with gene divergence, acquisition and loss, and rearrangement within the syntenic regions-have shaped the genomes of each parasite. Contrary to recent reports, our analyses reveal no evidence that these species are descended from an ancestor that contained a photosynthetic endosymbiont.
ESTHER : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
PubMedSearch : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
PubMedID: 16020724
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q382c1 , trycr-q4dhv2 , trycr-q4dpt2 , trycr-q4dpy4

Title : The transcriptional landscape of the mammalian genome - Carninci_2005_Science_309_1559
Author(s) : Carninci P , Kasukawa T , Katayama S , Gough J , Frith MC , Maeda N , Oyama R , Ravasi T , Lenhard B , Wells C , Kodzius R , Shimokawa K , Bajic VB , Brenner SE , Batalov S , Forrest AR , Zavolan M , Davis MJ , Wilming LG , Aidinis V , Allen JE , Ambesi-Impiombato A , Apweiler R , Aturaliya RN , Bailey TL , Bansal M , Baxter L , Beisel KW , Bersano T , Bono H , Chalk AM , Chiu KP , Choudhary V , Christoffels A , Clutterbuck DR , Crowe ML , Dalla E , Dalrymple BP , de Bono B , Della Gatta G , di Bernardo D , Down T , Engstrom P , Fagiolini M , Faulkner G , Fletcher CF , Fukushima T , Furuno M , Futaki S , Gariboldi M , Georgii-Hemming P , Gingeras TR , Gojobori T , Green RE , Gustincich S , Harbers M , Hayashi Y , Hensch TK , Hirokawa N , Hill D , Huminiecki L , Iacono M , Ikeo K , Iwama A , Ishikawa T , Jakt M , Kanapin A , Katoh M , Kawasawa Y , Kelso J , Kitamura H , Kitano H , Kollias G , Krishnan SP , Kruger A , Kummerfeld SK , Kurochkin IV , Lareau LF , Lazarevic D , Lipovich L , Liu J , Liuni S , McWilliam S , Madan Babu M , Madera M , Marchionni L , Matsuda H , Matsuzawa S , Miki H , Mignone F , Miyake S , Morris K , Mottagui-Tabar S , Mulder N , Nakano N , Nakauchi H , Ng P , Nilsson R , Nishiguchi S , Nishikawa S , Nori F , Ohara O , Okazaki Y , Orlando V , Pang KC , Pavan WJ , Pavesi G , Pesole G , Petrovsky N , Piazza S , Reed J , Reid JF , Ring BZ , Ringwald M , Rost B , Ruan Y , Salzberg SL , Sandelin A , Schneider C , Schonbach C , Sekiguchi K , Semple CA , Seno S , Sessa L , Sheng Y , Shibata Y , Shimada H , Shimada K , Silva D , Sinclair B , Sperling S , Stupka E , Sugiura K , Sultana R , Takenaka Y , Taki K , Tammoja K , Tan SL , Tang S , Taylor MS , Tegner J , Teichmann SA , Ueda HR , van Nimwegen E , Verardo R , Wei CL , Yagi K , Yamanishi H , Zabarovsky E , Zhu S , Zimmer A , Hide W , Bult C , Grimmond SM , Teasdale RD , Liu ET , Brusic V , Quackenbush J , Wahlestedt C , Mattick JS , Hume DA , Kai C , Sasaki D , Tomaru Y , Fukuda S , Kanamori-Katayama M , Suzuki M , Aoki J , Arakawa T , Iida J , Imamura K , Itoh M , Kato T , Kawaji H , Kawagashira N , Kawashima T , Kojima M , Kondo S , Konno H , Nakano K , Ninomiya N , Nishio T , Okada M , Plessy C , Shibata K , Shiraki T , Suzuki S , Tagami M , Waki K , Watahiki A , Okamura-Oho Y , Suzuki H , Kawai J , Hayashizaki Y
Ref : Science , 309 :1559 , 2005
Abstract : This study describes comprehensive polling of transcription start and termination sites and analysis of previously unidentified full-length complementary DNAs derived from the mouse genome. We identify the 5' and 3' boundaries of 181,047 transcripts with extensive variation in transcripts arising from alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. There are 16,247 new mouse protein-coding transcripts, including 5154 encoding previously unidentified proteins. Genomic mapping of the transcriptome reveals transcriptional forests, with overlapping transcription on both strands, separated by deserts in which few transcripts are observed. The data provide a comprehensive platform for the comparative analysis of mammalian transcriptional regulation in differentiation and development.
ESTHER : Carninci_2005_Science_309_1559
PubMedSearch : Carninci_2005_Science_309_1559
PubMedID: 16141072
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-abhd1 , mouse-abhd3 , mouse-abhd4 , mouse-acot4 , mouse-adcl4 , mouse-DGLB , mouse-ephx3 , mouse-Kansl3 , mouse-lipli , mouse-LIPN , mouse-Ppgb , mouse-q3uuq7 , mouse-srac1 , mouse-Tex30 , mouse-tmco4 , mouse-tmm53 , mouse-f172a

Title : Serendipitous discovery of Wolbachia genomes in multiple Drosophila species - Salzberg_2005_Genome.Biol_6_R23
Author(s) : Salzberg SL , Dunning Hotopp JC , Delcher AL , Pop M , Smith DR , Eisen MB , Nelson WC
Ref : Genome Biol , 6 :R23 , 2005
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The Trace Archive is a repository for the raw, unanalyzed data generated by large-scale genome sequencing projects. The existence of this data offers scientists the possibility of discovering additional genomic sequences beyond those originally sequenced. In particular, if the source DNA for a sequencing project came from a species that was colonized by another organism, then the project may yield substantial amounts of genomic DNA, including near-complete genomes, from the symbiotic or parasitic organism.
RESULTS: By searching the publicly available repository of DNA sequencing trace data, we discovered three new species of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis in three different species of fruit fly: Drosophila ananassae, D. simulans, and D. mojavensis. We extracted all sequences with partial matches to a previously sequenced Wolbachia strain and assembled those sequences using customized software. For one of the three new species, the data recovered were sufficient to produce an assembly that covers more than 95% of the genome; for a second species the data produce the equivalent of a 'light shotgun' sampling of the genome, covering an estimated 75-80% of the genome; and for the third species the data cover approximately 6-7% of the genome.
CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study reveal an unexpected benefit of depositing raw data in a central genome sequence repository: new species can be discovered within this data. The differences between these three new Wolbachia genomes and the previously sequenced strain revealed numerous rearrangements and insertions within each lineage and hundreds of novel genes. The three new genomes, with annotation, have been deposited in GenBank.
ESTHER : Salzberg_2005_Genome.Biol_6_R23
PubMedSearch : Salzberg_2005_Genome.Biol_6_R23
PubMedID: 15774024
Gene_locus related to this paper: wolpm-q73gf0 , wolpm-q73gx7

Title : Sequence, annotation, and analysis of synteny between rice chromosome 3 and diverged grass species - Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
Author(s) : Buell CR , Yuan Q , Ouyang S , Liu J , Zhu W , Wang A , Maiti R , Haas B , Wortman J , Pertea M , Jones KM , Kim M , Overton L , Tsitrin T , Fadrosh D , Bera J , Weaver B , Jin S , Johri S , Reardon M , Webb K , Hill J , Moffat K , Tallon L , Van Aken S , Lewis M , Utterback T , Feldblyum T , Zismann V , Iobst S , Hsiao J , de Vazeille AR , Salzberg SL , White O , Fraser C , Yu Y , Kim H , Rambo T , Currie J , Collura K , Kernodle-Thompson S , Wei F , Kudrna K , Ammiraju JS , Luo M , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Henry D , Oates R , Palmer M , Pries G , Saski C , Simmons J , Soderlund C , Nelson W , de la Bastide M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Huang E , Preston R , Zutavern T , Palmer LE , O'Shaughnessy A , Dike S , McCombie WR , Minx P , Cordum H , Wilson R , Jin W , Lee HR , Jiang J , Jackson S
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1284 , 2005
Abstract : Rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 3 is evolutionarily conserved across the cultivated cereals and shares large blocks of synteny with maize and sorghum, which diverged from rice more than 50 million years ago. To begin to completely understand this chromosome, we sequenced, finished, and annotated 36.1 Mb ( approximately 97%) from O. sativa subsp. japonica cv Nipponbare. Annotation features of the chromosome include 5915 genes, of which 913 are related to transposable elements. A putative function could be assigned to 3064 genes, with another 757 genes annotated as expressed, leaving 2094 that encode hypothetical proteins. Similarity searches against the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed putative homologs for 67% of the chromosome 3 proteins. Further searches of a nonredundant amino acid database, the Pfam domain database, plant Expressed Sequence Tags, and genomic assemblies from sorghum and maize revealed only 853 nontransposable element related proteins from chromosome 3 that lacked similarity to other known sequences. Interestingly, 426 of these have a paralog within the rice genome. A comparative physical map of the wild progenitor species, Oryza nivara, with japonica chromosome 3 revealed a high degree of sequence identity and synteny between these two species, which diverged approximately 10,000 years ago. Although no major rearrangements were detected, the deduced size of the O. nivara chromosome 3 was 21% smaller than that of japonica. Synteny between rice and other cereals using an integrated maize physical map and wheat genetic map was strikingly high, further supporting the use of rice and, in particular, chromosome 3, as a model for comparative studies among the cereals.
ESTHER : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedSearch : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedID: 16109971
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysj-cgep , orysj-q0dud7 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2

Title : Genome sequence of Theileria parva, a bovine pathogen that transforms lymphocytes - Gardner_2005_Science_309_134
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Bishop R , Shah T , de Villiers EP , Carlton JM , Hall N , Ren Q , Paulsen IT , Pain A , Berriman M , Wilson RJ , Sato S , Ralph SA , Mann DJ , Xiong Z , Shallom SJ , Weidman J , Jiang L , Lynn J , Weaver B , Shoaibi A , Domingo AR , Wasawo D , Crabtree J , Wortman JR , Haas B , Angiuoli SV , Creasy TH , Lu C , Suh B , Silva JC , Utterback TR , Feldblyum TV , Pertea M , Allen J , Nierman WC , Taracha EL , Salzberg SL , White OR , Fitzhugh HA , Morzaria S , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Nene V
Ref : Science , 309 :134 , 2005
Abstract : We report the genome sequence of Theileria parva, an apicomplexan pathogen causing economic losses to smallholder farmers in Africa. The parasite chromosomes exhibit limited conservation of gene synteny with Plasmodium falciparum, and its plastid-like genome represents the first example where all apicoplast genes are encoded on one DNA strand. We tentatively identify proteins that facilitate parasite segregation during host cell cytokinesis and contribute to persistent infection of transformed host cells. Several biosynthetic pathways are incomplete or absent, suggesting substantial metabolic dependence on the host cell. One protein family that may generate parasite antigenic diversity is not telomere-associated.
ESTHER : Gardner_2005_Science_309_134
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2005_Science_309_134
PubMedID: 15994558
Gene_locus related to this paper: thepa-q4mzr2 , thepa-q4n0b4 , thepa-q4n2i4 , thepa-q4n4i8 , thepa-q4n5d6 , thepa-q4n5m4 , thepa-q4n006 , thepa-q4n9g7 , thepa-q4n315 , thepa-q4n349 , thepa-q4n803

Title : Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Pain A , Anderson MJ , Wortman JR , Kim HS , Arroyo J , Berriman M , Abe K , Archer DB , Bermejo C , Bennett J , Bowyer P , Chen D , Collins M , Coulsen R , Davies R , Dyer PS , Farman M , Fedorova N , Feldblyum TV , Fischer R , Fosker N , Fraser A , Garcia JL , Garcia MJ , Goble A , Goldman GH , Gomi K , Griffith-Jones S , Gwilliam R , Haas B , Haas H , Harris D , Horiuchi H , Huang J , Humphray S , Jimenez J , Keller N , Khouri H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Konzack S , Kulkarni R , Kumagai T , Lafon A , Latge JP , Li W , Lord A , Lu C , Majoros WH , May GS , Miller BL , Mohamoud Y , Molina M , Monod M , Mouyna I , Mulligan S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Paulsen I , Penalva MA , Pertea M , Price C , Pritchard BL , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlins N , Rajandream MA , Reichard U , Renauld H , Robson GD , Rodriguez de Cordoba S , Rodriguez-Pena JM , Ronning CM , Rutter S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez M , Sanchez-Ferrero JC , Saunders D , Seeger K , Squares R , Squares S , Takeuchi M , Tekaia F , Turner G , Vazquez de Aldana CR , Weidman J , White O , Woodward J , Yu JH , Fraser C , Galagan JE , Asai K , Machida M , Hall N , Barrell B , Denning DW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1151 , 2005
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedID: 16372009
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-apth1 , aspfu-axe1 , aspfu-CBPYA , aspfu-faec , aspfu-kex1 , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4wa39 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wkh6 , aspfu-q4wnx3 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q5vjg7 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspfu-fmac

Title : Genomic insights into methanotrophy: the complete genome sequence of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) - Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
Author(s) : Ward N , Larsen O , Sakwa J , Bruseth L , Khouri H , Durkin AS , Dimitrov G , Jiang L , Scanlan D , Kang KH , Lewis M , Nelson KE , Methe B , Wu M , Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Fouts D , Ravel J , Tettelin H , Ren Q , Read T , DeBoy RT , Seshadri R , Salzberg SL , Jensen HB , Birkeland NK , Nelson WC , Dodson RJ , Grindhaug SH , Holt I , Eidhammer I , Jonasen I , Vanaken S , Utterback T , Feldblyum TV , Fraser CM , Lillehaug JR , Eisen JA
Ref : PLoS Biol , 2 :e303 , 2004
Abstract : Methanotrophs are ubiquitous bacteria that can use the greenhouse gas methane as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, thus playing major roles in global carbon cycles, and in particular, substantially reducing emissions of biologically generated methane to the atmosphere. Despite their importance, and in contrast to organisms that play roles in other major parts of the carbon cycle such as photosynthesis, no genome-level studies have been published on the biology of methanotrophs. We report the first complete genome sequence to our knowledge from an obligate methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), obtained by the shotgun sequencing approach. Analysis revealed a 3.3-Mb genome highly specialized for a methanotrophic lifestyle, including redundant pathways predicted to be involved in methanotrophy and duplicated genes for essential enzymes such as the methane monooxygenases. We used phylogenomic analysis, gene order information, and comparative analysis with the partially sequenced methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens to detect genes of unknown function likely to be involved in methanotrophy and methylotrophy. Genome analysis suggests the ability of M. capsulatus to scavenge copper (including a previously unreported nonribosomal peptide synthetase) and to use copper in regulation of methanotrophy, but the exact regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. One of the most surprising outcomes of the project is evidence suggesting the existence of previously unsuspected metabolic flexibility in M. capsulatus, including an ability to grow on sugars, oxidize chemolithotrophic hydrogen and sulfur, and live under reduced oxygen tension, all of which have implications for methanotroph ecology. The availability of the complete genome of M. capsulatus (Bath) deepens our understanding of methanotroph biology and its relationship to global carbon cycles. We have gained evidence for greater metabolic flexibility than was previously known, and for genetic components that may have biotechnological potential.
ESTHER : Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
PubMedSearch : Ward_2004_PLoS.Biol_2_e303
PubMedID: 15383840
Gene_locus related to this paper: metca-q60a38 , metca-q60bu6 , metca-q60cn0 , metca-q605j8 , metca-q606x9 , metca-q607f7 , metca-q607m2 , metca-q609v0

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames and comparison to closely related bacteria - Read_2003_Nature_423_81
Author(s) : Read TD , Peterson SN , Tourasse N , Baillie LW , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Holtzapple EK , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Rilstone J , Wu M , Kolonay JF , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Gwinn M , DeBoy RT , Madpu R , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Pop M , Khouri HM , Radune D , Benton JL , Mahamoud Y , Jiang L , Hance IR , Weidman JF , Berry KJ , Plaut RD , Wolf AM , Watkins KL , Nierman WC , Hazen A , Cline R , Redmond C , Thwaite JE , White O , Salzberg SL , Thomason B , Friedlander AM , Koehler TM , Hanna PC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 423 :81 , 2003
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is an endospore-forming bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax. Key virulence genes are found on plasmids (extra-chromosomal, circular, double-stranded DNA molecules) pXO1 (ref. 2) and pXO2 (ref. 3). To identify additional genes that might contribute to virulence, we analysed the complete sequence of the chromosome of B. anthracis Ames (about 5.23 megabases). We found several chromosomally encoded proteins that may contribute to pathogenicity--including haemolysins, phospholipases and iron acquisition functions--and identified numerous surface proteins that might be important targets for vaccines and drugs. Almost all these putative chromosomal virulence and surface proteins have homologues in Bacillus cereus, highlighting the similarity of B. anthracis to near-neighbours that are not associated with anthrax. By performing a comparative genome hybridization of 19 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains against a B. anthracis DNA microarray, we confirmed the general similarity of chromosomal genes among this group of close relatives. However, we found that the gene sequences of pXO1 and pXO2 were more variable between strains, suggesting plasmid mobility in the group. The complete sequence of B. anthracis is a step towards a better understanding of anthrax pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedID: 12721629
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0160 , bacan-BA0950 , bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA1747 , bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA1914 , bacan-BA2015 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2417 , bacan-BA2557 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA2694 , bacan-BA2738 , bacan-BA2865 , bacan-BA3068 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3187 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3372 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4328 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA4983 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacan-q81tt2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx

Title : Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in the evolution of the Chlamydiaceae - Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
Author(s) : Read TD , Myers GS , Brunham RC , Nelson WC , Paulsen IT , Heidelberg J , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Federova NB , Carty HA , Umayam LA , Haft DH , Peterson J , Beanan MJ , White O , Salzberg SL , Hsia RC , McClarty G , Rank RG , Bavoil PM , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 31 :2134 , 2003
Abstract : The genome of Chlamydophila caviae (formerly Chlamydia psittaci, GPIC isolate) (1 173 390 nt with a plasmid of 7966 nt) was determined, representing the fourth species with a complete genome sequence from the Chlamydiaceae family of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens. Of 1009 annotated genes, 798 were conserved in all three other completed Chlamydiaceae genomes. The C.caviae genome contains 68 genes that lack orthologs in any other completed chlamydial genomes, including tryptophan and thiamine biosynthesis determinants and a ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, the product of the prsA gene. Notable amongst these was a novel member of the virulence-associated invasin/intimin family (IIF) of Gram-negative bacteria. Intriguingly, two authentic frameshift mutations in the ORF indicate that this gene is not functional. Many of the unique genes are found in the replication termination region (RTR or plasticity zone), an area of frequent symmetrical inversion events around the replication terminus shown to be a hotspot for genome variation in previous genome sequencing studies. In C.caviae, the RTR includes several loci of particular interest including a large toxin gene and evidence of ancestral insertion(s) of a bacteriophage. This toxin gene, not present in Chlamydia pneumoniae, is a member of the YopT effector family of type III-secreted cysteine proteases. One gene cluster (guaBA-add) in the RTR is much more similar to orthologs in Chlamydia muridarum than those in the phylogenetically closest species C.pneumoniae, suggesting the possibility of horizontal transfer of genes between the rodent-associated Chlamydiae. With most genes observed in the other chlamydial genomes represented, C.caviae provides a good model for the Chlamydiaceae and a point of comparison against the human atherosclerosis-associated C.pneumoniae. This crucial addition to the set of completed Chlamydiaceae genome sequences is enabling dissection of the roles played by niche-specific genes in these important bacterial pathogens.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
PubMedID: 12682364
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlca-CCA00443 , chlca-CCA00510 , chlca-CCA00609 , chlca-CCA00614 , chlcv-p94660

Title : The Brucella suis genome reveals fundamental similarities between animal and plant pathogens and symbionts - Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
Author(s) : Paulsen IT , Seshadri R , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Read TD , Dodson RJ , Umayam L , Brinkac LM , Beanan MJ , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Ayodeji B , Kraul M , Shetty J , Malek J , Van Aken SE , Riedmuller S , Tettelin H , Gill SR , White O , Salzberg SL , Hoover DL , Lindler LE , Halling SM , Boyle SM , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :13148 , 2002
Abstract : The 3.31-Mb genome sequence of the intracellular pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent, Brucella suis, was determined. Comparison of B. suis with Brucella melitensis has defined a finite set of differences that could be responsible for the differences in virulence and host preference between these organisms, and indicates that phage have played a significant role in their divergence. Analysis of the B. suis genome reveals transport and metabolic capabilities akin to soil/plant-associated bacteria. Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts. A limited repertoire of genes homologous to known bacterial virulence factors were identified.
ESTHER : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedSearch : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedID: 12271122
Gene_locus related to this paper: brume-BMEI0552 , brume-BMEI0733 , brume-BMEI1044 , brume-BMEI1119 , brume-BMEI1365 , brume-BMEI1594 , brume-BMEI1608 , brume-BMEI1822 , brume-BMEI1884 , brume-BMEI1951 , brume-BMEI2011 , brume-BMEII0047 , brume-BMEII0681 , brume-BMEII0989 , brume-PCAD , brusu-BR0288 , brusu-BR1291 , brusu-BR1327 , brusu-BRA0989

Title : The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae - Holt_2002_Science_298_129
Author(s) : Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Halpern A , Sutton GG , Charlab R , Nusskern DR , Wincker P , Clark AG , Ribeiro JM , Wides R , Salzberg SL , Loftus B , Yandell M , Majoros WH , Rusch DB , Lai Z , Kraft CL , Abril JF , Anthouard V , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Baden H , de Berardinis V , Baldwin D , Benes V , Biedler J , Blass C , Bolanos R , Boscus D , Barnstead M , Cai S , Center A , Chaturverdi K , Christophides GK , Chrystal MA , Clamp M , Cravchik A , Curwen V , Dana A , Delcher A , Dew I , Evans CA , Flanigan M , Grundschober-Freimoser A , Friedli L , Gu Z , Guan P , Guigo R , Hillenmeyer ME , Hladun SL , Hogan JR , Hong YS , Hoover J , Jaillon O , Ke Z , Kodira C , Kokoza E , Koutsos A , Letunic I , Levitsky A , Liang Y , Lin JJ , Lobo NF , Lopez JR , Malek JA , McIntosh TC , Meister S , Miller J , Mobarry C , Mongin E , Murphy SD , O'Brochta DA , Pfannkoch C , Qi R , Regier MA , Remington K , Shao H , Sharakhova MV , Sitter CD , Shetty J , Smith TJ , Strong R , Sun J , Thomasova D , Ton LQ , Topalis P , Tu Z , Unger MF , Walenz B , Wang A , Wang J , Wang M , Wang X , Woodford KJ , Wortman JR , Wu M , Yao A , Zdobnov EM , Zhang H , Zhao Q , Zhao S , Zhu SC , Zhimulev I , Coluzzi M , della Torre A , Roth CW , Louis C , Kalush F , Mural RJ , Myers EW , Adams MD , Smith HO , Broder S , Gardner MJ , Fraser CM , Birney E , Bork P , Brey PT , Venter JC , Weissenbach J , Kafatos FC , Collins FH , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 298 :129 , 2002
Abstract : Anopheles gambiae is the principal vector of malaria, a disease that afflicts more than 500 million people and causes more than 1 million deaths each year. Tenfold shotgun sequence coverage was obtained from the PEST strain of A. gambiae and assembled into scaffolds that span 278 million base pairs. A total of 91% of the genome was organized in 303 scaffolds; the largest scaffold was 23.1 million base pairs. There was substantial genetic variation within this strain, and the apparent existence of two haplotypes of approximately equal frequency ("dual haplotypes") in a substantial fraction of the genome likely reflects the outbred nature of the PEST strain. The sequence produced a conservative inference of more than 400,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that showed a markedly bimodal density distribution. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed strong evidence for about 14,000 protein-encoding transcripts. Prominent expansions in specific families of proteins likely involved in cell adhesion and immunity were noted. An expressed sequence tag analysis of genes regulated by blood feeding provided insights into the physiological adaptations of a hematophagous insect.
ESTHER : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedSearch : Holt_2002_Science_298_129
PubMedID: 12364791
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-a0nb77 , anoga-a0nbp6 , anoga-a0neb7 , anoga-a0nei9 , anoga-a0nej0 , anoga-a0ngj1 , anoga-a7ut12 , anoga-a7uuz9 , anoga-ACHE1 , anoga-ACHE2 , anoga-agCG44620 , anoga-agCG44666 , anoga-agCG45273 , anoga-agCG45279 , anoga-agCG45511 , anoga-agCG46741 , anoga-agCG47651 , anoga-agCG47655 , anoga-agCG47661 , anoga-agCG47690 , anoga-agCG48797 , anoga-AGCG49362 , anoga-agCG49462 , anoga-agCG49870 , anoga-agCG49872 , anoga-agCG49876 , anoga-agCG50851 , anoga-agCG51879 , anoga-agCG52383 , anoga-agCG54954 , anoga-AGCG55021 , anoga-agCG55401 , anoga-agCG55408 , anoga-agCG56978 , anoga-ebiG239 , anoga-ebiG2660 , anoga-ebiG5718 , anoga-ebiG5974 , anoga-ebiG8504 , anoga-ebiG8742 , anoga-glita , anoga-nrtac , anoga-q5tpv0 , anoga-Q5TVS6 , anoga-q7pm39 , anoga-q7ppw9 , anoga-q7pq17 , anoga-Q7PQT0 , anoga-q7q8m4 , anoga-q7q626 , anoga-q7qa14 , anoga-q7qa52 , anoga-q7qal7 , anoga-q7qbj0 , anoga-f5hl20 , anoga-q7qkh2 , anoga-a0a1s4h1y7 , anoga-q7q887

Title : Comparative genome and proteome analysis of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster - Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
Author(s) : Zdobnov EM , von Mering C , Letunic I , Torrents D , Suyama M , Copley RR , Christophides GK , Thomasova D , Holt RA , Subramanian GM , Mueller HM , Dimopoulos G , Law JH , Wells MA , Birney E , Charlab R , Halpern AL , Kokoza E , Kraft CL , Lai Z , Lewis S , Louis C , Barillas-Mury C , Nusskern D , Rubin GM , Salzberg SL , Sutton GG , Topalis P , Wides R , Wincker P , Yandell M , Collins FH , Ribeiro J , Gelbart WM , Kafatos FC , Bork P
Ref : Science , 298 :149 , 2002
Abstract : Comparison of the genomes and proteomes of the two diptera Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster, which diverged about 250 million years ago, reveals considerable similarities. However, numerous differences are also observed; some of these must reflect the selection and subsequent adaptation associated with different ecologies and life strategies. Almost half of the genes in both genomes are interpreted as orthologs and show an average sequence identity of about 56%, which is slightly lower than that observed between the orthologs of the pufferfish and human (diverged about 450 million years ago). This indicates that these two insects diverged considerably faster than vertebrates. Aligned sequences reveal that orthologous genes have retained only half of their intron/exon structure, indicating that intron gains or losses have occurred at a rate of about one per gene per 125 million years. Chromosomal arms exhibit significant remnants of homology between the two species, although only 34% of the genes colocalize in small "microsyntenic" clusters, and major interarm transfers as well as intra-arm shuffling of gene order are detected.
ESTHER : Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
PubMedSearch : Zdobnov_2002_Science_298_149
PubMedID: 12364792

Title : Whole-genome comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical and laboratory strains - Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Alland D , Eisen JA , Carpenter L , White O , Peterson J , Deboy R , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Haft D , Hickey E , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Umayam LA , Ermolaeva M , Salzberg SL , Delcher A , Utterback T , Weidman J , Khouri H , Gill J , Mikula A , Bishai W , Jacobs Jr WR, Jr. , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 184 :5479 , 2002
Abstract : Virulence and immunity are poorly understood in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We sequenced the complete genome of the M. tuberculosis clinical strain CDC1551 and performed a whole-genome comparison with the laboratory strain H37Rv in order to identify polymorphic sequences with potential relevance to disease pathogenesis, immunity, and evolution. We found large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in numerous genes. Polymorphic loci included a phospholipase C, a membrane lipoprotein, members of an adenylate cyclase gene family, and members of the PE/PPE gene family, some of which have been implicated in virulence or the host immune response. Several gene families, including the PE/PPE gene family, also had significantly higher synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution frequencies compared to the genome as a whole. We tested a large sample of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates for a subset of the large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and found widespread genetic variability at many of these loci. We performed phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis to investigate the evolutionary relationships among isolates and the origins of specific polymorphic loci. A number of these polymorphisms appear to have occurred multiple times as independent events, suggesting that these changes may be under selective pressure. Together, these results demonstrate that polymorphisms among M. tuberculosis strains are more extensive than initially anticipated, and genetic variation may have an important role in disease pathogenesis and immunity.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedID: 12218036
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Genome sequence and comparative analysis of the model rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii yoelii - Carlton_2002_Nature_419_512
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Angiuoli SV , Suh BB , Kooij TW , Pertea M , Silva JC , Ermolaeva MD , Allen JE , Selengut JD , Koo HL , Peterson JD , Pop M , Kosack DS , Shumway MF , Bidwell SL , Shallom SJ , Van Aken SE , Riedmuller SB , Feldblyum TV , Cho JK , Quackenbush J , Sedegah M , Shoaibi A , Cummings LM , Florens L , Yates JR , Raine JD , Sinden RE , Harris MA , Cunningham DA , Preiser PR , Bergman LW , Vaidya AB , van Lin LH , Janse CJ , Waters AP , Smith HO , White OR , Salzberg SL , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Hoffman SL , Gardner MJ , Carucci DJ
Ref : Nature , 419 :512 , 2002
Abstract : Species of malaria parasite that infect rodents have long been used as models for malaria disease research. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of one species, Plasmodium yoelii yoelii, and comparative studies with the genome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7. A synteny map of 2,212 P. y. yoelii contiguous DNA sequences (contigs) aligned to 14 P. falciparum chromosomes reveals marked conservation of gene synteny within the body of each chromosome. Of about 5,300 P. falciparum genes, more than 3,300 P. y. yoelii orthologues of predominantly metabolic function were identified. Over 800 copies of a variant antigen gene located in subtelomeric regions were found. This is the first genome sequence of a model eukaryotic parasite, and it provides insight into the use of such systems in the modelling of Plasmodium biology and disease.
ESTHER : Carlton_2002_Nature_419_512
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2002_Nature_419_512
PubMedID: 12368865
Gene_locus related to this paper: playo-PY04076 , playo-PY04938 , playo-PY05572 , playo-q7pdu6 , playo-q7r7y2 , playo-q7rbj8 , playo-q7rdk4 , playo-q7rgi9 , playo-q7rh25 , playo-q7rki0 , playo-q7rl68 , playo-q7rl69 , playo-q7rmm1 , playo-q7rn16 , playo-q7rpk0 , playo-q7rq09 , playo-q7rq49 , playo-q7rq68

Title : Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Hall N , Fung E , White O , Berriman M , Hyman RW , Carlton JM , Pain A , Nelson KE , Bowman S , Paulsen IT , James K , Eisen JA , Rutherford K , Salzberg SL , Craig A , Kyes S , Chan MS , Nene V , Shallom SJ , Suh B , Peterson J , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , Haft D , Mather MW , Vaidya AB , Martin DM , Fairlamb AH , Fraunholz MJ , Roos DS , Ralph SA , McFadden GI , Cummings LM , Subramanian GM , Mungall C , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Newbold C , Davis RW , Fraser CM , Barrell B
Ref : Nature , 419 :498 , 2002
Abstract : The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the genomes of free-living eukaryotic microbes, the genome of this intracellular parasite encodes fewer enzymes and transporters, but a large proportion of genes are devoted to immune evasion and host-parasite interactions. Many nuclear-encoded proteins are targeted to the apicoplast, an organelle involved in fatty-acid and isoprenoid metabolism. The genome sequence provides the foundation for future studies of this organism, and is being exploited in the search for new drugs and vaccines to fight malaria.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedID: 12368864
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plaf7-q8i5y6 , plaf7-q8iik5 , plafa-PF10.0018 , plafa-PF10.0020 , plafa-PF10.0379 , plafa-PF11.0211 , plafa-PF11.0276 , plafa-PF11.0441 , plafa-PF14.0015 , plafa-PF14.0017 , plafa-PF14.0099 , plafa-PF14.0250 , plafa-PF14.0395 , plafa-PF14.0737 , plafa-PF14.0738 , plafa-PFL2530W

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 2, 10, 11 and 14 - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Shallom SJ , Carlton JM , Salzberg SL , Nene V , Shoaibi A , Ciecko A , Lynn J , Rizzo M , Weaver B , Jarrahi B , Brenner M , Parvizi B , Tallon L , Moazzez A , Granger D , Fujii C , Hansen C , Pederson J , Feldblyum T , Peterson J , Suh B , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , White O , Cummings LM , Smith HO , Adams MD , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 419 :531 , 2002
Abstract : The mosquito-borne malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum kills an estimated 0.7-2.7 million people every year, primarily children in sub-Saharan Africa. Without effective interventions, a variety of factors-including the spread of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs and the increasing insecticide resistance of mosquitoes-may cause the number of malaria cases to double over the next two decades. To stimulate basic research and facilitate the development of new drugs and vaccines, the genome of Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 has been sequenced using a chromosome-by-chromosome shotgun strategy. We report here the nucleotide sequences of chromosomes 10, 11 and 14, and a re-analysis of the chromosome 2 sequence. These chromosomes represent about 35% of the 23-megabase P. falciparum genome.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedID: 12368868
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-MAL3P8.11

Title : A comparison of whole-genome shotgun-derived mouse chromosome 16 and the human genome - Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
Author(s) : Mural RJ , Adams MD , Myers EW , Smith HO , Miklos GL , Wides R , Halpern A , Li PW , Sutton GG , Nadeau J , Salzberg SL , Holt RA , Kodira CD , Lu F , Chen L , Deng Z , Evangelista CC , Gan W , Heiman TJ , Li J , Li Z , Merkulov GV , Milshina NV , Naik AK , Qi R , Shue BC , Wang A , Wang J , Wang X , Yan X , Ye J , Yooseph S , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zhu SC , Biddick K , Bolanos R , Delcher AL , Dew IM , Fasulo D , Flanigan MJ , Huson DH , Kravitz SA , Miller JR , Mobarry CM , Reinert K , Remington KA , Zhang Q , Zheng XH , Nusskern DR , Lai Z , Lei Y , Zhong W , Yao A , Guan P , Ji RR , Gu Z , Wang ZY , Zhong F , Xiao C , Chiang CC , Yandell M , Wortman JR , Amanatides PG , Hladun SL , Pratts EC , Johnson JE , Dodson KL , Woodford KJ , Evans CA , Gropman B , Rusch DB , Venter E , Wang M , Smith TJ , Houck JT , Tompkins DE , Haynes C , Jacob D , Chin SH , Allen DR , Dahlke CE , Sanders R , Li K , Liu X , Levitsky AA , Majoros WH , Chen Q , Xia AC , Lopez JR , Donnelly MT , Newman MH , Glodek A , Kraft CL , Nodell M , Ali F , An HJ , Baldwin-Pitts D , Beeson KY , Cai S , Carnes M , Carver A , Caulk PM , Center A , Chen YH , Cheng ML , Coyne MD , Crowder M , Danaher S , Davenport LB , Desilets R , Dietz SM , Doup L , Dullaghan P , Ferriera S , Fosler CR , Gire HC , Gluecksmann A , Gocayne JD , Gray J , Hart B , Haynes J , Hoover J , Howland T , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Johns D , Kline L , Ma DS , MacCawley S , Magoon A , Mann F , May D , McIntosh TC , Mehta S , Moy L , Moy MC , Murphy BJ , Murphy SD , Nelson KA , Nuri Z , Parker KA , Prudhomme AC , Puri VN , Qureshi H , Raley JC , Reardon MS , Regier MA , Rogers YH , Romblad DL , Schutz J , Scott JL , Scott R , Sitter CD , Smallwood M , Sprague AC , Stewart E , Strong RV , Suh E , Sylvester K , Thomas R , Tint NN , Tsonis C , Wang G , Williams MS , Williams SM , Windsor SM , Wolfe K , Wu MM , Zaveri J , Chaturvedi K , Gabrielian AE , Ke Z , Sun J , Subramanian G , Venter JC , Pfannkoch CM , Barnstead M , Stephenson LD
Ref : Science , 296 :1661 , 2002
Abstract : The high degree of similarity between the mouse and human genomes is demonstrated through analysis of the sequence of mouse chromosome 16 (Mmu 16), which was obtained as part of a whole-genome shotgun assembly of the mouse genome. The mouse genome is about 10% smaller than the human genome, owing to a lower repetitive DNA content. Comparison of the structure and protein-coding potential of Mmu 16 with that of the homologous segments of the human genome identifies regions of conserved synteny with human chromosomes (Hsa) 3, 8, 12, 16, 21, and 22. Gene content and order are highly conserved between Mmu 16 and the syntenic blocks of the human genome. Of the 731 predicted genes on Mmu 16, 509 align with orthologs on the corresponding portions of the human genome, 44 are likely paralogous to these genes, and 164 genes have homologs elsewhere in the human genome; there are 14 genes for which we could find no human counterpart.
ESTHER : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedSearch : Mural_2002_Science_296_1661
PubMedID: 12040188
Gene_locus related to this paper: mouse-ABH15 , mouse-Ces3b , mouse-Ces4a , mouse-dpp4 , mouse-FAP , mouse-Lipg , mouse-Q8C1A9 , mouse-rbbp9 , mouse-SERHL , mouse-SPG21 , mouse-w4vsp6

Title : Comparative genome sequencing for discovery of novel polymorphisms in Bacillus anthracis - Read_2002_Science_296_2028
Author(s) : Read TD , Salzberg SL , Pop M , Shumway M , Umayam L , Jiang L , Holtzapple E , Busch JD , Smith KL , Schupp JM , Solomon D , Keim P , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 296 :2028 , 2002
Abstract : Comparison of the whole-genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis isolated from a victim of a recent bioterrorist anthrax attack with a reference reveals 60 new markers that include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), inserted or deleted sequences, and tandem repeats. Genome comparison detected four high-quality SNPs between the two sequenced B. anthracis chromosomes and seven differences among different preparations of the reference genome. These markers have been tested on a collection of anthrax isolates and were found to divide these samples into distinct families. These results demonstrate that genome-based analysis of microbial pathogens will provide a powerful new tool for investigation of infectious disease outbreaks.
ESTHER : Read_2002_Science_296_2028
PubMedSearch : Read_2002_Science_296_2028
PubMedID: 12004073

Title : Full-length messenger RNA sequences greatly improve genome annotation - Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
Author(s) : Haas BJ , Volfovsky N , Town CD , Troukhan M , Alexandrov N , Feldmann KA , Flavell RB , White O , Salzberg SL
Ref : Genome Biol , 3 :RESEARCH0029 , 2002
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Annotation of eukaryotic genomes is a complex endeavor that requires the integration of evidence from multiple, often contradictory, sources. With the ever-increasing amount of genome sequence data now available, methods for accurate identification of large numbers of genes have become urgently needed. In an effort to create a set of very high-quality gene models, we used the sequence of 5,000 full-length gene transcripts from Arabidopsis to re-annotate its genome. We have mapped these transcripts to their exact chromosomal locations and, using alignment programs, have created gene models that provide a reference set for this organism.
RESULTS: Approximately 35% of the transcripts indicated that previously annotated genes needed modification, and 5% of the transcripts represented newly discovered genes. We also discovered that multiple transcription initiation sites appear to be much more common than previously known, and we report numerous cases of alternative mRNA splicing. We include a comparison of different alignment software and an analysis of how the transcript data improved the previously published annotation.
CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that sequencing of large numbers of full-length transcripts followed by computational mapping greatly improves identification of the complete exon structures of eukaryotic genes. In addition, we are able to find numerous introns in the untranslated regions of the genes.
ESTHER : Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
PubMedSearch : Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
PubMedID: 12093376
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT1G74640 , arath-At2g47630 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-At5g11650 , arath-AT5G19290 , arath-AT5G19630 , arath-AT5G20060 , arath-AT5G20520 , arath-AtD14 , arath-F1O17.3 , arath-F1O17.5 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F12L6.7 , arath-F22K18.40 , arath-At3g60340 , arath-LCAT1 , arath-PLA16 , arath-Q8L996 , arath-q8lae9 , arath-Q8LF34 , arath-Q8LFB7 , arath-Q8LFU1 , arath-q8s8g6 , arath-q9ffg7 , arath-Q9LNR2 , arath-SCP40 , arath-At4g12230 , arath-AT4G10030 , arath-T5M16.2 , arath-MES14 , arath-T19F11.2 , arath-Y1457 , arath-T26B15.8 , arath-SFGH , arath-f4jt64

Title : Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus - Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Laub MT , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Alley MR , Ohta N , Maddock JR , Potocka I , Nelson WC , Newton A , Stephens C , Phadke ND , Ely B , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Smit J , Craven MB , Khouri H , Shetty J , Berry K , Utterback T , Tran K , Wolf A , Vamathevan J , Ermolaeva M , White O , Salzberg SL , Venter JC , Shapiro L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :4136 , 2001
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus was determined to be 4,016,942 base pairs in a single circular chromosome encoding 3,767 genes. This organism, which grows in a dilute aquatic environment, coordinates the cell division cycle and multiple cell differentiation events. With the annotated genome sequence, a full description of the genetic network that controls bacterial differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle progression is within reach. Two-component signal transduction proteins are known to play a significant role in cell cycle progression. Genome analysis revealed that the C. crescentus genome encodes a significantly higher number of these signaling proteins (105) than any bacterial genome sequenced thus far. Another regulatory mechanism involved in cell cycle progression is DNA methylation. The occurrence of the recognition sequence for an essential DNA methylating enzyme that is required for cell cycle regulation is severely limited and shows a bias to intergenic regions. The genome contains multiple clusters of genes encoding proteins essential for survival in a nutrient poor habitat. Included are those involved in chemotaxis, outer membrane channel function, degradation of aromatic ring compounds, and the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources, in addition to many extracytoplasmic function sigma factors, providing the organism with the ability to respond to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. C. crescentus is, to our knowledge, the first free-living alpha-class proteobacterium to be sequenced and will serve as a foundation for exploring the biology of this group of bacteria, which includes the obligate endosymbiont and human pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the bovine and human pathogen Brucella abortus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedID: 11259647
Gene_locus related to this paper: caucr-CC0087 , caucr-CC0223 , caucr-CC0341 , caucr-CC0352 , caucr-CC0355 , caucr-CC0384 , caucr-CC0477 , caucr-CC0478 , caucr-CC0525 , caucr-CC0552 , caucr-CC0771 , caucr-CC0799 , caucr-CC0847 , caucr-CC0936 , caucr-CC0940 , caucr-CC1048 , caucr-CC1053 , caucr-CC1175 , caucr-CC1226 , caucr-CC1227 , caucr-CC1229 , caucr-CC1499 , caucr-CC1622 , caucr-CC1734 , caucr-CC1867 , caucr-CC1986 , caucr-CC2083 , caucr-CC2154 , caucr-CC2185 , caucr-CC2230 , caucr-CC2253 , caucr-CC2298 , caucr-CC2313 , caucr-CC2358 , caucr-CC2395 , caucr-CC2411 , caucr-CC2515 , caucr-CC2565 , caucr-CC2671 , caucr-CC2710 , caucr-CC2763 , caucr-CC2797 , caucr-CC3039 , caucr-CC3091 , caucr-CC3099 , caucr-CC3204 , caucr-CC3246 , caucr-CC3300 , caucr-CC3308 , caucr-CC3346 , caucr-CC3418 , caucr-CC3441 , caucr-CC3442 , caucr-CC3634 , caucr-CC3687 , caucr-CC3688 , caucr-CC3723 , caucr-CC3725 , caucr-CC3758 , caucr-PHAZ , caucr-PHBC , caucr-q9a8c1 , caucr-q9aac8

Title : Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae - Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Peterson S , Heidelberg J , DeBoy RT , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Salzberg SL , Lewis MR , Radune D , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Wolf AM , Utterback TR , Hansen CL , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Angiuoli S , Dickinson T , Hickey EK , Holt IE , Loftus BJ , Yang F , Smith HO , Venter JC , Dougherty BA , Morrison DA , Hollingshead SK , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 293 :498 , 2001
Abstract : The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to genome rearrangements through uptake of foreign DNA. Extracellular enzyme systems for the metabolism of polysaccharides and hexosamines provide a substantial source of carbon and nitrogen for S. pneumoniae and also damage host tissues and facilitate colonization. A motif identified within the signal peptide of proteins is potentially involved in targeting these proteins to the cell surface of low-guanine/cytosine (GC) Gram-positive species. Several surface-exposed proteins that may serve as potential vaccine candidates were identified. Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedID: 11463916
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpj-b8zns7 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-b2dz20 , strpn-pepx , strpn-SP0614 , strpn-SP0666 , strpn-SP0777 , strpn-SP0902 , strpn-SP1343

Title : Complete genome sequence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 - Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Saunders NJ , Heidelberg J , Jeffries AC , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Ketchum KA , Hood DW , Peden JF , Dodson RJ , Nelson WC , Gwinn ML , Deboy R , Peterson JD , Hickey EK , Haft DH , Salzberg SL , White O , Fleischmann RD , Dougherty BA , Mason T , Ciecko A , Parksey DS , Blair E , Cittone H , Clark EB , Cotton MD , Utterback TR , Khouri H , Qin H , Vamathevan J , Gill J , Scarlato V , Masignani V , Pizza M , Grandi G , Sun L , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Moxon ER , Rappuoli R , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :1809 , 2000
Abstract : The 2,272,351-base pair genome of Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 (serogroup B), a causative agent of meningitis and septicemia, contains 2158 predicted coding regions, 1158 (53.7%) of which were assigned a biological role. Three major islands of horizontal DNA transfer were identified; two of these contain genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenicity, and the third island contains coding sequences only for hypothetical proteins. Insights into the commensal and virulence behavior of N. meningitidis can be gleaned from the genome, in which sequences for structural proteins of the pilus are clustered and several coding regions unique to serogroup B capsular polysaccharide synthesis can be identified. Finally, N. meningitidis contains more genes that undergo phase variation than any pathogen studied to date, a mechanism that controls their expression and contributes to the evasion of the host immune system.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedID: 10710307
Gene_locus related to this paper: neigo-pip , neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB0868 , neime-NMB1828 , neime-NMB1877

Title : Genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis MoPn and Chlamydia pneumoniae AR39 - Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
Author(s) : Read TD , Brunham RC , Shen C , Gill SR , Heidelberg JF , White O , Hickey EK , Peterson J , Utterback T , Berry K , Bass S , Linher K , Weidman J , Khouri H , Craven B , Bowman C , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Nelson W , Deboy R , Kolonay J , McClarty G , Salzberg SL , Eisen J , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 28 :1397 , 2000
Abstract : The genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) strain Nigg (1 069 412 nt) and Chlamydia pneumoniae strain AR39 (1 229 853 nt) were determined using a random shotgun strategy. The MoPn genome exhibited a general conservation of gene order and content with the previously sequenced C.trachomatis serovar D. Differences between C.trachomatis strains were focused on an approximately 50 kb 'plasticity zone' near the termination origins. In this region MoPn contained three copies of a novel gene encoding a >3000 amino acid toxin homologous to a predicted toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7 but had apparently lost the tryptophan biosyntheis genes found in serovar D in this region. The C. pneumoniae AR39 chromosome was >99.9% identical to the previously sequenced C.pneumoniae CWL029 genome, however, comparative analysis identified an invertible DNA segment upstream of the uridine kinase gene which was in different orientations in the two genomes. AR39 also contained a novel 4524 nt circular single-stranded (ss)DNA bacteriophage, the first time a virus has been reported infecting C. pneumoniae. Although the chlamydial genomes were highly conserved, there were intriguing differences in key nucleotide salvage pathways: C.pneumoniae has a uridine kinase gene for dUTP production, MoPn has a uracil phosphororibosyl transferase, while C.trachomatis serovar D contains neither gene. Chromosomal comparison revealed that there had been multiple large inversion events since the species divergence of C.trachomatis and C.pneumoniae, apparently oriented around the axis of the origin of replication and the termination region. The striking synteny of the Chlamydia genomes and prevalence of tandemly duplicated genes are evidence of minimal chromosome rearrangement and foreign gene uptake, presumably owing to the ecological isolation of the obligate intracellular parasites. In the absence of genetic analysis, comparative genomics will continue to provide insight into the virulence mechanisms of these important human pathogens.
ESTHER : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedSearch : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedID: 10684935
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlmu-TC0345 , chlmu-TC0413 , chlmu-TC0426 , chlmu-TC0478 , chlpn-CPJ0152 , chlpn-CPJ0342 , chlpn-CPN0161 , chlpn-CPN0271 , chlpn-q9jrv1 , chlpn-q9js10 , chlpn-q9k1u7 , chlpn-q9z6x9

Title : DNA sequence of both chromosomes of the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae - Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Eisen JA , Nelson WC , Clayton RA , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Umayam L , Gill SR , Nelson KE , Read TD , Tettelin H , Richardson D , Ermolaeva MD , Vamathevan J , Bass S , Qin H , Dragoi I , Sellers P , McDonald L , Utterback T , Fleishmann RD , Nierman WC , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Colwell RR , Mekalanos JJ , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 406 :477 , 2000
Abstract : Here we determine the complete genomic sequence of the gram negative, gamma-Proteobacterium Vibrio cholerae El Tor N16961 to be 4,033,460 base pairs (bp). The genome consists of two circular chromosomes of 2,961,146 bp and 1,072,314 bp that together encode 3,885 open reading frames. The vast majority of recognizable genes for essential cell functions (such as DNA replication, transcription, translation and cell-wall biosynthesis) and pathogenicity (for example, toxins, surface antigens and adhesins) are located on the large chromosome. In contrast, the small chromosome contains a larger fraction (59%) of hypothetical genes compared with the large chromosome (42%), and also contains many more genes that appear to have origins other than the gamma-Proteobacteria. The small chromosome also carries a gene capture system (the integron island) and host 'addiction' genes that are typically found on plasmids; thus, the small chromosome may have originally been a megaplasmid that was captured by an ancestral Vibrio species. The V. cholerae genomic sequence provides a starting point for understanding how a free-living, environmental organism emerged to become a significant human bacterial pathogen.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedID: 10952301
Gene_locus related to this paper: vibch-rtxAABH , vibch-lipas , vibch-VC0135 , vibch-VC0522 , vibch-VC1418 , vibch-VC1725 , vibch-VC1974 , vibch-VC1986 , vibch-VC2097 , vibch-VC2432 , vibch-VC2610 , vibch-VC2718 , vibch-VCA0063 , vibch-VCA0092 , vibch-VCA0490 , vibch-VCA0688 , vibch-VCA0754 , vibch-VCA0863 , vibch-y1892 , vibch-y2276

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
Author(s) : Salanoubat M , Lemcke K , Rieger M , Ansorge W , Unseld M , Fartmann B , Valle G , Blocker H , Perez-Alonso M , Obermaier B , Delseny M , Boutry M , Grivell LA , Mache R , Puigdomenech P , de Simone V , Choisne N , Artiguenave F , Robert C , Brottier P , Wincker P , Cattolico L , Weissenbach J , Saurin W , Quetier F , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Benes V , Wurmbach E , Drzonek H , Erfle H , Jordan N , Bangert S , Wiedelmann R , Kranz H , Voss H , Holland R , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Vezzi A , D'Angelo M , Pallavicini A , Toppo S , Simionati B , Conrad A , Hornischer K , Kauer G , Lohnert TH , Nordsiek G , Reichelt J , Scharfe M , Schon O , Bargues M , Terol J , Climent J , Navarro P , Collado C , Perez-Perez A , Ottenwalder B , Duchemin D , Cooke R , Laudie M , Berger-Llauro C , Purnelle B , Masuy D , de Haan M , Maarse AC , Alcaraz JP , Cottet A , Casacuberta E , Monfort A , Argiriou A , Flores M , Liguori R , Vitale D , Mannhaupt G , Haase D , Schoof H , Rudd S , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Mayer KF , Kaul S , Town CD , Koo HL , Tallon LJ , Jenkins J , Rooney T , Rizzo M , Walts A , Utterback T , Fujii CY , Shea TP , Creasy TH , Haas B , Maiti R , Wu D , Peterson J , Van Aken S , Pai G , Militscher J , Sellers P , Gill JE , Feldblyum TV , Preuss D , Lin X , Nierman WC , Salzberg SL , White O , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Sato S , Kato T , Asamizu E , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Idesawa K , Kawashima K , Kishida Y , Kiyokawa C , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Tabata S
Ref : Nature , 408 :820 , 2000
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedSearch : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedID: 11130713
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-MES17 , arath-AT3G12150 , arath-At3g61680 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CXE12 , arath-eds1 , arath-SCP25 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F1P2.140 , arath-F11F8.28 , arath-F14D17.80 , arath-F16B3.4 , arath-SCP27 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-At3g05600 , arath-PAD4 , arath-At3g51000 , arath-SCP16 , arath-gid1 , arath-GID1B , arath-Q9LUG8 , arath-Q84JS1 , arath-Q9SFF6 , arath-q9m236 , arath-q9sr22 , arath-q9sr23 , arath-SCP7 , arath-SCP14 , arath-SCP15 , arath-SCP17 , arath-SCP36 , arath-SCP37 , arath-SCP39 , arath-SCP40 , arath-SCP49 , arath-T19F11.2

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 1 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
Author(s) : Theologis A , Ecker JR , Palm CJ , Federspiel NA , Kaul S , White O , Alonso J , Altafi H , Araujo R , Bowman CL , Brooks SY , Buehler E , Chan A , Chao Q , Chen H , Cheuk RF , Chin CW , Chung MK , Conn L , Conway AB , Conway AR , Creasy TH , Dewar K , Dunn P , Etgu P , Feldblyum TV , Feng J , Fong B , Fujii CY , Gill JE , Goldsmith AD , Haas B , Hansen NF , Hughes B , Huizar L , Hunter JL , Jenkins J , Johnson-Hopson C , Khan S , Khaykin E , Kim CJ , Koo HL , Kremenetskaia I , Kurtz DB , Kwan A , Lam B , Langin-Hooper S , Lee A , Lee JM , Lenz CA , Li JH , Li Y , Lin X , Liu SX , Liu ZA , Luros JS , Maiti R , Marziali A , Militscher J , Miranda M , Nguyen M , Nierman WC , Osborne BI , Pai G , Peterson J , Pham PK , Rizzo M , Rooney T , Rowley D , Sakano H , Salzberg SL , Schwartz JR , Shinn P , Southwick AM , Sun H , Tallon LJ , Tambunga G , Toriumi MJ , Town CD , Utterback T , Van Aken S , Vaysberg M , Vysotskaia VS , Walker M , Wu D , Yu G , Fraser CM , Venter JC , Davis RW
Ref : Nature , 408 :816 , 2000
Abstract : The genome of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana has five chromosomes. Here we report the sequence of the largest, chromosome 1, in two contigs of around 14.2 and 14.6 megabases. The contigs extend from the telomeres to the centromeric borders, regions rich in transposons, retrotransposons and repetitive elements such as the 180-base-pair repeat. The chromosome represents 25% of the genome and contains about 6,850 open reading frames, 236 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and 12 small nuclear RNAs. There are two clusters of tRNA genes at different places on the chromosome. One consists of 27 tRNA(Pro) genes and the other contains 27 tandem repeats of tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Ser) genes. Chromosome 1 contains about 300 gene families with clustered duplications. There are also many repeat elements, representing 8% of the sequence.
ESTHER : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedSearch : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedID: 11130712
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At1g05790 , arath-At1g09280 , arath-At1g09980 , arath-AT1G29120 , arath-AT1G52695 , arath-AT1G66900 , arath-At1g73750 , arath-AT1G73920 , arath-AT1G74640 , arath-AT1G76140 , arath-AT1G78210 , arath-clh1 , arath-F1O17.3 , arath-F1O17.4 , arath-F1O17.5 , arath-F5I6.3 , arath-At1g52700 , arath-F6D8.27 , arath-F6D8.32 , arath-F9L1.44 , arath-F9P14.11 , arath-F12A4.4 , arath-MES11 , arath-F14G24.2 , arath-F14G24.3 , arath-F14I3.4 , arath-F14O10.2 , arath-F16N3.25 , arath-LCAT2 , arath-At1g34340 , arath-MES15 , arath-CXE6 , arath-ICML1 , arath-At1g72620 , arath-LCAT1 , arath-PLA12 , arath-PLA15 , arath-PLA17 , arath-Q8L7S1 , arath-At1g15070 , arath-SCP2 , arath-SCP4 , arath-SCP5 , arath-SCP18 , arath-SCP32 , arath-SCP44 , arath-SCP45 , arath-SCPL6 , arath-F4IE65 , arath-At1g30370 , arath-T6L1.8 , arath-T6L1.20 , arath-T14P4.6 , arath-MES14 , arath-SCP3 , arath-AXR4 , arath-At1g10040 , arath-ZW18 , arath-pae2 , arath-pae1 , arath-a0a1p8awg3

Title : Evidence for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and bacteria from genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima - Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Clayton RA , Gill SR , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Nelson WC , Ketchum KA , McDonald L , Utterback TR , Malek JA , Linher KD , Garrett MM , Stewart AM , Cotton MD , Pratt MS , Phillips CA , Richardson D , Heidelberg J , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Eisen JA , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 399 :323 , 1999
Abstract : The 1,860,725-base-pair genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8 contains 1,877 predicted coding regions, 1,014 (54%) of which have functional assignments and 863 (46%) of which are of unknown function. Genome analysis reveals numerous pathways involved in degradation of sugars and plant polysaccharides, and 108 genes that have orthologues only in the genomes of other thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea. Of the Eubacteria sequenced to date, T. maritima has the highest percentage (24%) of genes that are most similar to archaeal genes. Eighty-one archaeal-like genes are clustered in 15 regions of the T. maritima genome that range in size from 4 to 20 kilobases. Conservation of gene order between T. maritima and Archaea in many of the clustered regions suggests that lateral gene transfer may have occurred between thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea.
ESTHER : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedSearch : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedID: 10360571
Gene_locus related to this paper: thema-ESTA , thema-q9x0d6 , thema-q9x042 , thema-TM0033 , thema-TM0053 , thema-TM0077 , thema-TM0336 , thema-TM1160 , thema-TM1350

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 2 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
Author(s) : Lin X , Kaul S , Rounsley S , Shea TP , Benito MI , Town CD , Fujii CY , Mason T , Bowman CL , Barnstead M , Feldblyum TV , Buell CR , Ketchum KA , Lee J , Ronning CM , Koo HL , Moffat KS , Cronin LA , Shen M , Pai G , Van Aken S , Umayam L , Tallon LJ , Gill JE , Adams MD , Carrera AJ , Creasy TH , Goodman HM , Somerville CR , Copenhaver GP , Preuss D , Nierman WC , White O , Eisen JA , Salzberg SL , Fraser CM , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 402 :761 , 1999
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is unique among plant model organisms in having a small genome (130-140 Mb), excellent physical and genetic maps, and little repetitive DNA. Here we report the sequence of chromosome 2 from the Columbia ecotype in two gap-free assemblies (contigs) of 3.6 and 16 megabases (Mb). The latter represents the longest published stretch of uninterrupted DNA sequence assembled from any organism to date. Chromosome 2 represents 15% of the genome and encodes 4,037 genes, 49% of which have no predicted function. Roughly 250 tandem gene duplications were found in addition to large-scale duplications of about 0.5 and 4.5 Mb between chromosomes 2 and 1 and between chromosomes 2 and 4, respectively. Sequencing of nearly 2 Mb within the genetically defined centromere revealed a low density of recognizable genes, and a high density and diverse range of vestigial and presumably inactive mobile elements. More unexpected is what appears to be a recent insertion of a continuous stretch of 75% of the mitochondrial genome into chromosome 2.
ESTHER : Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
PubMedSearch : Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
PubMedID: 10617197
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At2g45610 , arath-AT2G03550 , arath-AT2G05260 , arath-AT2G12480 , arath-At2g15230 , arath-At2g18360 , arath-At2g19550 , arath-At2g19620 , arath-At2g24280 , arath-AT2G24320 , arath-At2g26740 , arath-At2g26750 , arath-SCP51 , arath-AT2G36290 , arath-At2g42450 , arath-AT2G42690 , arath-AT2G44970 , arath-At2g47630 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CGEP , arath-F12L6.6 , arath-F12L6.7 , arath-F12L6.8 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-MES6 , arath-MES7 , arath-MES4 , arath-MES8 , arath-MES2 , arath-MES3 , arath-MES1 , arath-o80731 , arath-pip , arath-PLA11 , arath-PLA13 , arath-PLA16 , arath-PLA19 , arath-q84w08 , arath-SCP8 , arath-SCP9 , arath-SCP10 , arath-SCP11 , arath-SCP12 , arath-SCP13 , arath-SCP23 , arath-SCP26 , arath-SCP28 , arath-SCP46 , arath-T26B15.8 , arath-SCP22 , arath-SFGH , arath-MES19