Waterhouse RM

References (9)

Title : Genomic signatures accompanying the dietary shift to phytophagy in polyphagan beetles - Seppey_2019_Genome.Biol_20_98
Author(s) : Seppey M , Ioannidis P , Emerson BC , Pitteloud C , Robinson-Rechavi M , Roux J , Escalona HE , McKenna DD , Misof B , Shin S , Zhou X , Waterhouse RM , Alvarez N
Ref : Genome Biol , 20 :98 , 2019
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The diversity and evolutionary success of beetles (Coleoptera) are proposed to be related to the diversity of plants on which they feed. Indeed, the largest beetle suborder, Polyphaga, mostly includes plant eaters among its approximately 315,000 species. In particular, plants defend themselves with a diversity of specialized toxic chemicals. These may impose selective pressures that drive genomic diversification and speciation in phytophagous beetles. However, evidence of changes in beetle gene repertoires driven by such interactions remains largely anecdotal and without explicit hypothesis testing. RESULTS: We explore the genomic consequences of beetle-plant trophic interactions by performing comparative gene family analyses across 18 species representative of the two most species-rich beetle suborders. We contrast the gene contents of species from the mostly plant-eating suborder Polyphaga with those of the mainly predatory Adephaga. We find gene repertoire evolution to be more dynamic, with significantly more adaptive lineage-specific expansions, in the more speciose Polyphaga. Testing the specific hypothesis of adaptation to plant feeding, we identify families of enzymes putatively involved in beetle-plant interactions that underwent adaptive expansions in Polyphaga. There is notable support for the selection hypothesis on large gene families for glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase detoxification enzymes. CONCLUSIONS: Our explicit modeling of the evolution of gene repertoires across 18 species identifies putative adaptive lineage-specific gene family expansions that accompany the dietary shift towards plants in beetles. These genomic signatures support the popular hypothesis of a key role for interactions with plant chemical defenses, and for plant feeding in general, in driving beetle diversification.
ESTHER : Seppey_2019_Genome.Biol_20_98
PubMedSearch : Seppey_2019_Genome.Biol_20_98
PubMedID: 31101123

Title : Lucilia cuprina genome unlocks parasitic fly biology to underpin future interventions - Anstead_2015_Nat.Commun_6_7344
Author(s) : Anstead CA , Korhonen PK , Young ND , Hall RS , Jex AR , Murali SC , Hughes DS , Lee SF , Perry T , Stroehlein AJ , Ansell BR , Breugelmans B , Hofmann A , Qu J , Dugan S , Lee SL , Chao H , Dinh H , Han Y , Doddapaneni HV , Worley KC , Muzny DM , Ioannidis P , Waterhouse RM , Zdobnov EM , James PJ , Bagnall NH , Kotze AC , Gibbs RA , Richards S , Batterham P , Gasser RB
Ref : Nat Commun , 6 :7344 , 2015
Abstract : Lucilia cuprina is a parasitic fly of major economic importance worldwide. Larvae of this fly invade their animal host, feed on tissues and excretions and progressively cause severe skin disease (myiasis). Here we report the sequence and annotation of the 458-megabase draft genome of Lucilia cuprina. Analyses of this genome and the 14,544 predicted protein-encoding genes provide unique insights into the fly's molecular biology, interactions with the host animal and insecticide resistance. These insights have broad implications for designing new methods for the prevention and control of myiasis.
ESTHER : Anstead_2015_Nat.Commun_6_7344
PubMedSearch : Anstead_2015_Nat.Commun_6_7344
PubMedID: 26108605
Gene_locus related to this paper: luccu-a0a0l0bn77 , luccu-a0a0l0clk8 , luccu-a0a0l0bxv5 , luccu-a0a0l0bvt1 , luccu-a0a0l0bw31

Title : Genome sequence of the Asian Tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, reveals insights into its biology, genetics, and evolution - Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
Author(s) : Chen XG , Jiang X , Gu J , Xu M , Wu Y , Deng Y , Zhang C , Bonizzoni M , Dermauw W , Vontas J , Armbruster P , Huang X , Yang Y , Zhang H , He W , Peng H , Liu Y , Wu K , Chen J , Lirakis M , Topalis P , Van Leeuwen T , Hall AB , Thorpe C , Mueller RL , Sun C , Waterhouse RM , Yan G , Tu ZJ , Fang X , James AA
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 112 :E5907 , 2015
Abstract : The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a highly successful invasive species that transmits a number of human viral diseases, including dengue and Chikungunya fevers. This species has a large genome with significant population-based size variation. The complete genome sequence was determined for the Foshan strain, an established laboratory colony derived from wild mosquitoes from southeastern China, a region within the historical range of the origin of the species. The genome comprises 1,967 Mb, the largest mosquito genome sequenced to date, and its size results principally from an abundance of repetitive DNA classes. In addition, expansions of the numbers of members in gene families involved in insecticide-resistance mechanisms, diapause, sex determination, immunity, and olfaction also contribute to the larger size. Portions of integrated flavivirus-like genomes support a shared evolutionary history of association of these viruses with their vector. The large genome repertory may contribute to the adaptability and success of Ae. albopictus as an invasive species.
ESTHER : Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
PubMedSearch : Chen_2015_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_112_E5907
PubMedID: 26483478
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-q177c7 , aedal-a0a182gwe3 , aedal-a0a182gwt8 , aedal-a0a023eq67

Title : The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization - Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
Author(s) : Sadd BM , Barribeau SM , Bloch G , de Graaf DC , Dearden P , Elsik CG , Gadau J , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Hasselmann M , Lozier JD , Robertson HM , Smagghe G , Stolle E , Van Vaerenbergh M , Waterhouse RM , Bornberg-Bauer E , Klasberg S , Bennett AK , Camara F , Guigo R , Hoff K , Mariotti M , Munoz-Torres M , Murphy T , Santesmasses D , Amdam GV , Beckers M , Beye M , Biewer M , Bitondi MM , Blaxter ML , Bourke AF , Brown MJ , Buechel SD , Cameron R , Cappelle K , Carolan JC , Christiaens O , Ciborowski KL , Clarke DF , Colgan TJ , Collins DH , Cridge AG , Dalmay T , Dreier S , du Plessis L , Duncan E , Erler S , Evans J , Falcon T , Flores K , Freitas FC , Fuchikawa T , Gempe T , Hartfelder K , Hauser F , Helbing S , Humann FC , Irvine F , Jermiin LS , Johnson CE , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Kadowaki T , Kidner JH , Koch V , Kohler A , Kraus FB , Lattorff HM , Leask M , Lockett GA , Mallon EB , Antonio DS , Marxer M , Meeus I , Moritz RF , Nair A , Napflin K , Nissen I , Niu J , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Osborne A , Otte M , Pinheiro DG , Rossie N , Rueppell O , Santos CG , Schmid-Hempel R , Schmitt BD , Schulte C , Simoes ZL , Soares MP , Swevers L , Winnebeck EC , Wolschin F , Yu N , Zdobnov EM , Aqrawi PK , Blankenburg KP , Coyle M , Francisco L , Hernandez AG , Holder M , Hudson ME , Jackson L , Jayaseelan J , Joshi V , Kovar C , Lee SL , Mata R , Mathew T , Newsham IF , Ngo R , Okwuonu G , Pham C , Pu LL , Saada N , Santibanez J , Simmons D , Thornton R , Venkat A , Walden KK , Wu YQ , Debyser G , Devreese B , Asher C , Blommaert J , Chipman AD , Chittka L , Fouks B , Liu J , O'Neill MP , Sumner S , Puiu D , Qu J , Salzberg SL , Scherer SE , Muzny DM , Richards S , Robinson GE , Gibbs RA , Schmid-Hempel P , Worley KC
Ref : Genome Biol , 16 :76 , 2015
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats.
RESULTS: We report the high quality draft genome sequences of Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens, two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome features thought to underpin advanced eusociality are also present in bumblebees, indicating an earlier evolution in the bee lineage. Xenobiotic detoxification and immune genes are similarly depauperate in bumblebees and honeybees, and multiple categories of genes linked to social organization, including development and behavior, show high conservation. Key differences identified include a bias in bumblebee chemoreception towards gustation from olfaction, and striking differences in microRNAs, potentially responsible for gene regulation underlying social and other traits.
CONCLUSIONS: These two bumblebee genomes provide a foundation for post-genomic research on these key pollinators and insect societies. Overall, gene repertoires suggest that the route to advanced eusociality in bees was mediated by many small changes in many genes and processes, and not by notable expansion or depauperation.
ESTHER : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedSearch : Sadd_2015_Genome.Biol_16_76
PubMedID: 25908251

Title : Genome analysis of a major urban malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles stephensi - Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
Author(s) : Jiang X , Peery A , Hall AB , Sharma A , Chen XG , Waterhouse RM , Komissarov A , Riehle MM , Shouche Y , Sharakhova MV , Lawson D , Pakpour N , Arensburger P , Davidson VL , Eiglmeier K , Emrich S , George P , Kennedy RC , Mane SP , Maslen G , Oringanje C , Qi Y , Settlage R , Tojo M , Tubio JM , Unger MF , Wang B , Vernick KD , Ribeiro JM , James AA , Michel K , Riehle MA , Luckhart S , Sharakhov IV , Tu Z
Ref : Genome Biol , 15 :459 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Anopheles stephensi is the key vector of malaria throughout the Indian subcontinent and Middle East and an emerging model for molecular and genetic studies of mosquito-parasite interactions. The type form of the species is responsible for the majority of urban malaria transmission across its range.
RESULTS: Here, we report the genome sequence and annotation of the Indian strain of the type form of An. stephensi. The 221 Mb genome assembly represents more than 92% of the entire genome and was produced using a combination of 454, Illumina, and PacBio sequencing. Physical mapping assigned 62% of the genome onto chromosomes, enabling chromosome-based analysis. Comparisons between An. stephensi and An. gambiae reveal that the rate of gene order reshuffling on the X chromosome was three times higher than that on the autosomes. An. stephensi has more heterochromatin in pericentric regions but less repetitive DNA in chromosome arms than An. gambiae. We also identify a number of Y-chromosome contigs and BACs. Interspersed repeats constitute 7.1% of the assembled genome while LTR retrotransposons alone comprise more than 49% of the Y contigs. RNA-seq analyses provide new insights into mosquito innate immunity, development, and sexual dimorphism.
CONCLUSIONS: The genome analysis described in this manuscript provides a resource and platform for fundamental and translational research into a major urban malaria vector. Chromosome-based investigations provide unique perspectives on Anopheles chromosome evolution. RNA-seq analysis and studies of immunity genes offer new insights into mosquito biology and mosquito-parasite interactions.
ESTHER : Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
PubMedSearch : Jiang_2014_Genome.Biol_15_459
PubMedID: 25244985
Gene_locus related to this paper: anoga-Q7PVF9 , anoga-q7q837 , anost-a0a1a9thh9 , anost-a0a182xxz0 , anost-a0a182xzf1 , anost-a0a182xxy9 , anoga-q7q887

Title : Finding the missing honey bee genes: lessons learned from a genome upgrade - Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
Author(s) : Elsik CG , Worley KC , Bennett AK , Beye M , Camara F , Childers CP , de Graaf DC , Debyser G , Deng J , Devreese B , Elhaik E , Evans JD , Foster LJ , Graur D , Guigo R , Hoff KJ , Holder ME , Hudson ME , Hunt GJ , Jiang H , Joshi V , Khetani RS , Kosarev P , Kovar CL , Ma J , Maleszka R , Moritz RF , Munoz-Torres MC , Murphy TD , Muzny DM , Newsham IF , Reese JT , Robertson HM , Robinson GE , Rueppell O , Solovyev V , Stanke M , Stolle E , Tsuruda JM , Vaerenbergh MV , Waterhouse RM , Weaver DB , Whitfield CW , Wu Y , Zdobnov EM , Zhang L , Zhu D , Gibbs RA
Ref : BMC Genomics , 15 :86 , 2014
Abstract : BACKGROUND: The first generation of genome sequence assemblies and annotations have had a significant impact upon our understanding of the biology of the sequenced species, the phylogenetic relationships among species, the study of populations within and across species, and have informed the biology of humans. As only a few Metazoan genomes are approaching finished quality (human, mouse, fly and worm), there is room for improvement of most genome assemblies. The honey bee (Apis mellifera) genome, published in 2006, was noted for its bimodal GC content distribution that affected the quality of the assembly in some regions and for fewer genes in the initial gene set (OGSv1.0) compared to what would be expected based on other sequenced insect genomes.
RESULTS: Here, we report an improved honey bee genome assembly (Amel_4.5) with a new gene annotation set (OGSv3.2), and show that the honey bee genome contains a number of genes similar to that of other insect genomes, contrary to what was suggested in OGSv1.0. The new genome assembly is more contiguous and complete and the new gene set includes ~5000 more protein-coding genes, 50% more than previously reported. About 1/6 of the additional genes were due to improvements to the assembly, and the remaining were inferred based on new RNAseq and protein data.
CONCLUSIONS: Lessons learned from this genome upgrade have important implications for future genome sequencing projects. Furthermore, the improvements significantly enhance genomic resources for the honey bee, a key model for social behavior and essential to global ecology through pollination.
ESTHER : Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
PubMedSearch : Elsik_2014_BMC.Genomics_15_86
PubMedID: 24479613

Title : Functional and evolutionary insights from the genomes of three parasitoid Nasonia species - Werren_2010_Science_327_343
Author(s) : Werren JH , Richards S , Desjardins CA , Niehuis O , Gadau J , Colbourne JK , Beukeboom LW , Desplan C , Elsik CG , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Kitts P , Lynch JA , Murphy T , Oliveira DC , Smith CD , van de Zande L , Worley KC , Zdobnov EM , Aerts M , Albert S , Anaya VH , Anzola JM , Barchuk AR , Behura SK , Bera AN , Berenbaum MR , Bertossa RC , Bitondi MM , Bordenstein SR , Bork P , Bornberg-Bauer E , Brunain M , Cazzamali G , Chaboub L , Chacko J , Chavez D , Childers CP , Choi JH , Clark ME , Claudianos C , Clinton RA , Cree AG , Cristino AS , Dang PM , Darby AC , de Graaf DC , Devreese B , Dinh HH , Edwards R , Elango N , Elhaik E , Ermolaeva O , Evans JD , Foret S , Fowler GR , Gerlach D , Gibson JD , Gilbert DG , Graur D , Grunder S , Hagen DE , Han Y , Hauser F , Hultmark D , Hunter HCt , Hurst GD , Jhangian SN , Jiang H , Johnson RM , Jones AK , Junier T , Kadowaki T , Kamping A , Kapustin Y , Kechavarzi B , Kim J , Kiryutin B , Koevoets T , Kovar CL , Kriventseva EV , Kucharski R , Lee H , Lee SL , Lees K , Lewis LR , Loehlin DW , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Lopez JA , Lozado RJ , Maglott D , Maleszka R , Mayampurath A , Mazur DJ , McClure MA , Moore AD , Morgan MB , Muller J , Munoz-Torres MC , Muzny DM , Nazareth LV , Neupert S , Nguyen NB , Nunes FM , Oakeshott JG , Okwuonu GO , Pannebakker BA , Pejaver VR , Peng Z , Pratt SC , Predel R , Pu LL , Ranson H , Raychoudhury R , Rechtsteiner A , Reese JT , Reid JG , Riddle M , Robertson HM , Romero-Severson J , Rosenberg M , Sackton TB , Sattelle DB , Schluns H , Schmitt T , Schneider M , Schuler A , Schurko AM , Shuker DM , Simoes ZL , Sinha S , Smith Z , Solovyev V , Souvorov A , Springauf A , Stafflinger E , Stage DE , Stanke M , Tanaka Y , Telschow A , Trent C , Vattathil S , Verhulst EC , Viljakainen L , Wanner KW , Waterhouse RM , Whitfield JB , Wilkes TE , Williamson MS , Willis JH , Wolschin F , Wyder S , Yamada T , Yi SV , Zecher CN , Zhang L , Gibbs RA , Williamson M
Ref : Science , 327 :343 , 2010
Abstract : We report here genome sequences and comparative analyses of three closely related parasitoid wasps: Nasonia vitripennis, N. giraulti, and N. longicornis. Parasitoids are important regulators of arthropod populations, including major agricultural pests and disease vectors, and Nasonia is an emerging genetic model, particularly for evolutionary and developmental genetics. Key findings include the identification of a functional DNA methylation tool kit; hymenopteran-specific genes including diverse venoms; lateral gene transfers among Pox viruses, Wolbachia, and Nasonia; and the rapid evolution of genes involved in nuclear-mitochondrial interactions that are implicated in speciation. Newly developed genome resources advance Nasonia for genetic research, accelerate mapping and cloning of quantitative trait loci, and will ultimately provide tools and knowledge for further increasing the utility of parasitoids as pest insect-control agents.
ESTHER : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedSearch : Werren_2010_Science_327_343
PubMedID: 20075255
Gene_locus related to this paper: nasvi-ACHE1 , nasvi-ACHE2 , nasvi-k7in31 , nasvi-k7iwl9 , nasvi-k7iyk8 , nasvi-k7jlv1 , nasvi-k7in32 , nasvi-k7ind2 , nasvi-k7inh0 , nasvi-k7inh1 , nasvi-k7inh2 , nasvi-k7inp9 , nasvi-k7iun7 , nasvi-k7iv21 , nasvi-k7ivn5 , nasvi-k7ivn6 , nasvi-k7iw29 , nasvi-k7iwk5 , nasvi-k7iwl8 , nasvi-k7iz24 , nasvi-k7izb4 , nasvi-k7j5u6 , nasvi-k7j6y1 , nasvi-k7j6y2 , nasvi-k7j6y4 , nasvi-k7j718 , nasvi-k7j755 , nasvi-k7j756 , nasvi-k7j757 , nasvi-k7j7k5 , nasvi-k7j7n7 , nasvi-k7j7r8 , nasvi-k7j7s8 , nasvi-k7j7s9 , nasvi-k7j811 , nasvi-k7iny8 , nasvi-k7izf2 , nasvi-k7iwe2 , nasvi-k7j6w4 , nasvi-k7izl9 , nasvi-k7jf39 , nasvi-k7izl8 , nasvi-k7irf1 , nasvi-k7j7l1

Title : Genome sequences of the human body louse and its primary endosymbiont provide insights into the permanent parasitic lifestyle - Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
Author(s) : Kirkness EF , Haas BJ , Sun W , Braig HR , Perotti MA , Clark JM , Lee SH , Robertson HM , Kennedy RC , Elhaik E , Gerlach D , Kriventseva EV , Elsik CG , Graur D , Hill CA , Veenstra JA , Walenz B , Tubio JM , Ribeiro JM , Rozas J , Johnston JS , Reese JT , Popadic A , Tojo M , Raoult D , Reed DL , Tomoyasu Y , Kraus E , Mittapalli O , Margam VM , Li HM , Meyer JM , Johnson RM , Romero-Severson J , Vanzee JP , Alvarez-Ponce D , Vieira FG , Aguade M , Guirao-Rico S , Anzola JM , Yoon KS , Strycharz JP , Unger MF , Christley S , Lobo NF , Seufferheld MJ , Wang N , Dasch GA , Struchiner CJ , Madey G , Hannick LI , Bidwell S , Joardar V , Caler E , Shao R , Barker SC , Cameron S , Bruggner RV , Regier A , Johnson J , Viswanathan L , Utterback TR , Sutton GG , Lawson D , Waterhouse RM , Venter JC , Strausberg RL , Berenbaum MR , Collins FH , Zdobnov EM , Pittendrigh BR
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 107 :12168 , 2010
Abstract : As an obligatory parasite of humans, the body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus) is an important vector for human diseases, including epidemic typhus, relapsing fever, and trench fever. Here, we present genome sequences of the body louse and its primary bacterial endosymbiont Candidatus Riesia pediculicola. The body louse has the smallest known insect genome, spanning 108 Mb. Despite its status as an obligate parasite, it retains a remarkably complete basal insect repertoire of 10,773 protein-coding genes and 57 microRNAs. Representing hemimetabolous insects, the genome of the body louse thus provides a reference for studies of holometabolous insects. Compared with other insect genomes, the body louse genome contains significantly fewer genes associated with environmental sensing and response, including odorant and gustatory receptors and detoxifying enzymes. The unique architecture of the 18 minicircular mitochondrial chromosomes of the body louse may be linked to the loss of the gene encoding the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein. The genome of the obligatory louse endosymbiont Candidatus Riesia pediculicola encodes less than 600 genes on a short, linear chromosome and a circular plasmid. The plasmid harbors a unique arrangement of genes required for the synthesis of pantothenate, an essential vitamin deficient in the louse diet. The human body louse, its primary endosymbiont, and the bacterial pathogens that it vectors all possess genomes reduced in size compared with their free-living close relatives. Thus, the body louse genome project offers unique information and tools to use in advancing understanding of coevolution among vectors, symbionts, and pathogens.
ESTHER : Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
PubMedSearch : Kirkness_2010_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_107_12168
PubMedID: 20566863
Gene_locus related to this paper: pedhb-ACHE1 , pedhb-ACHE2 , pedhc-e0v9b5 , pedhc-e0v9b6 , pedhc-e0v9b7 , pedhc-e0vbv5 , pedhc-e0vcd0 , pedhc-e0vcl7 , pedhc-e0vd69 , pedhc-e0ve50 , pedhc-e0vel6 , pedhc-e0vel7 , pedhc-e0vf98 , pedhc-e0vfs8 , pedhc-e0vfv0 , pedhc-e0vg01 , pedhc-e0vha2 , pedhc-e0vha4 , pedhc-e0vi52 , pedhc-e0vp42 , pedhc-e0vqu6 , pedhc-e0vuj9 , pedhc-e0vup6 , pedhc-e0vv55 , pedhc-e0vwv3 , pedhc-e0vxf7 , pedhc-e0vxg1 , pedhc-e0w4a6 , pedhc-e0w4c8 , pedhc-e0w271 , pedhc-e0w444 , pedhc-e0vym0 , pedhc-e0vdk9 , pedhc-e0vk10 , pedhc-e0vgw4 , pedhc-e0vgw7 , pedhc-e0vga1 , pedhc-e0w3s1 , pedhc-e0vzt2

Title : The genome of the model beetle and pest Tribolium castaneum - Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
Author(s) : Richards S , Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Brown SJ , Denell R , Beeman RW , Gibbs R , Bucher G , Friedrich M , Grimmelikhuijzen CJ , Klingler M , Lorenzen M , Roth S , Schroder R , Tautz D , Zdobnov EM , Muzny D , Attaway T , Bell S , Buhay CJ , Chandrabose MN , Chavez D , Clerk-Blankenburg KP , Cree A , Dao M , Davis C , Chacko J , Dinh H , Dugan-Rocha S , Fowler G , Garner TT , Garnes J , Gnirke A , Hawes A , Hernandez J , Hines S , Holder M , Hume J , Jhangiani SN , Joshi V , Khan ZM , Jackson L , Kovar C , Kowis A , Lee S , Lewis LR , Margolis J , Morgan M , Nazareth LV , Nguyen N , Okwuonu G , Parker D , Ruiz SJ , Santibanez J , Savard J , Scherer SE , Schneider B , Sodergren E , Vattahil S , Villasana D , White CS , Wright R , Park Y , Lord J , Oppert B , Brown S , Wang L , Weinstock G , Liu Y , Worley K , Elsik CG , Reese JT , Elhaik E , Landan G , Graur D , Arensburger P , Atkinson P , Beidler J , Demuth JP , Drury DW , Du YZ , Fujiwara H , Maselli V , Osanai M , Robertson HM , Tu Z , Wang JJ , Wang S , Song H , Zhang L , Werner D , Stanke M , Morgenstern B , Solovyev V , Kosarev P , Brown G , Chen HC , Ermolaeva O , Hlavina W , Kapustin Y , Kiryutin B , Kitts P , Maglott D , Pruitt K , Sapojnikov V , Souvorov A , Mackey AJ , Waterhouse RM , Wyder S , Kriventseva EV , Kadowaki T , Bork P , Aranda M , Bao R , Beermann A , Berns N , Bolognesi R , Bonneton F , Bopp D , Butts T , Chaumot A , Denell RE , Ferrier DE , Gordon CM , Jindra M , Lan Q , Lattorff HM , Laudet V , von Levetsow C , Liu Z , Lutz R , Lynch JA , da Fonseca RN , Posnien N , Reuter R , Schinko JB , Schmitt C , Schoppmeier M , Shippy TD , Simonnet F , Marques-Souza H , Tomoyasu Y , Trauner J , Van der Zee M , Vervoort M , Wittkopp N , Wimmer EA , Yang X , Jones AK , Sattelle DB , Ebert PR , Nelson D , Scott JG , Muthukrishnan S , Kramer KJ , Arakane Y , Zhu Q , Hogenkamp D , Dixit R , Jiang H , Zou Z , Marshall J , Elpidina E , Vinokurov K , Oppert C , Evans J , Lu Z , Zhao P , Sumathipala N , Altincicek B , Vilcinskas A , Williams M , Hultmark D , Hetru C , Hauser F , Cazzamali G , Williamson M , Li B , Tanaka Y , Predel R , Neupert S , Schachtner J , Verleyen P , Raible F , Walden KK , Angeli S , Foret S , Schuetz S , Maleszka R , Miller SC , Grossmann D
Ref : Nature , 452 :949 , 2008
Abstract : Tribolium castaneum is a member of the most species-rich eukaryotic order, a powerful model organism for the study of generalized insect development, and an important pest of stored agricultural products. We describe its genome sequence here. This omnivorous beetle has evolved the ability to interact with a diverse chemical environment, as shown by large expansions in odorant and gustatory receptors, as well as P450 and other detoxification enzymes. Development in Tribolium is more representative of other insects than is Drosophila, a fact reflected in gene content and function. For example, Tribolium has retained more ancestral genes involved in cell-cell communication than Drosophila, some being expressed in the growth zone crucial for axial elongation in short-germ development. Systemic RNA interference in T. castaneum functions differently from that in Caenorhabditis elegans, but nevertheless offers similar power for the elucidation of gene function and identification of targets for selective insect control.
ESTHER : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedSearch : Richards_2008_Nature_452_949
PubMedID: 18362917
Gene_locus related to this paper: trica-ACHE1 , trica-ACHE2 , trica-d2a0g9 , trica-d2a0h0 , trica-d2a0w9 , trica-d2a0x0 , trica-d2a0x1 , trica-d2a0x3 , trica-d2a0x4.1 , trica-d2a0x4.2 , trica-d2a0x6 , trica-d2a2b8 , trica-d2a2h1 , trica-d2a3c3 , trica-d2a3g9 , trica-d2a5y5 , trica-d2a309 , trica-d2a514 , trica-d2a515 , trica-d2a516 , trica-d2a577 , trica-d2a578 , trica-d6w6x8 , trica-d6w7f9 , trica-d6w7h2 , trica-d6w8e7 , trica-d6w9c0 , trica-d6w855 , trica-d6wac8 , trica-d6wan4 , trica-d6wd50 , trica-d6wd73 , trica-d6wd74 , trica-A0A139WM97 , trica-d6wfu3 , trica-d6wgl2 , trica-d6wj57 , trica-d6wj59 , trica-d6wjs3 , trica-d6wl31 , trica-d6wnv1 , trica-d6wpl0 , trica-d6wqd6 , trica-d6wqr4 , trica-d6ws52 , trica-d6wsm0 , trica-d6wu38 , trica-d6wu39 , trica-d6wu40 , trica-d6wu41 , trica-d6wu44 , trica-d6wvk5 , trica-d6wvz7 , trica-d6wwu9 , trica-d6wwv0 , trica-d6wxz0 , trica-d6wyy1 , trica-d6wyy2 , trica-d6x0z2 , trica-d6x0z5 , trica-d6x0z6 , trica-d6x4b2 , trica-d6x4e8 , trica-d6x4e9 , trica-d6x197 , trica-d7eip7 , trica-d7eld3 , trica-d7us45 , trica-q5wm43 , trica-q5zex9 , trica-d6wie5 , trica-d6w7t0 , trica-d6x4h0 , trica-d6x4h1 , trica-a0a139wae8 , trica-a0a139wc96 , trica-d6x325 , trica-d2a4s2 , trica-d6wvw8