de Haan M

References (6)

Title : SLV330, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, ameliorates deficits in the T-maze, object recognition and Social Recognition Tasks in rodents - de Bruin_2010_Neurobiol.Learn.Mem_93_522
Author(s) : de Bruin NM , Prickaerts J , Lange JH , Akkerman S , Andriambeloson E , de Haan M , Wijnen J , van Drimmelen M , Hissink E , Heijink L , Kruse CG
Ref : Neurobiol Learn Mem , 93 :522 , 2010
Abstract : Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of memory and cognition. In the present study, our aim was to investigate whether the CB(1)R antagonist SLV330 (doses ranging from 0.3 to 10mg/kg, given orally, p.o.) could ameliorate impairments in distinct aspects of cognition using different disruption models in both mice and rats. Effects of SLV330 were tested on working memory deficits in the T-maze Continuous Alternation Task (T-CAT) in mice; episodic memory deficits in the Object Recognition Task (ORT) and Social Recognition Task (SRT) in rats. The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) donepezil (Aricept, approved for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease) and nicotine were used as reference compounds. SLV330 markedly improved aging and scopolamine-induced memory deficits in the T-CAT in mice with a lowest effective dose (LED) of 1mg/kg p.o., while reversing the cognitive dysfunction induced by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) only at the middle dose of 3mg/kg. In the ORT, we have found that combined administration of subthreshold doses of SLV330 (1mg/kg, p.o.) and the AChEI donepezil (0.1mg/kg, p.o.), that had no discernable effects on performance when given alone, enhanced memory performance in Wistar rats with deficits induced by the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, suggestive of additive synergistic effects of SLV330 and donepezil on cognitive impairment. Finally, SLV330 was found to have cognition enhancing properties in a time delay paradigm in the SRT at a LED dose of 3mg/kg (p.o.). In conclusion, the CB(1)R antagonist SLV330 was found to clearly improve memory in several preclinical models for cognitive impairment.
ESTHER : de Bruin_2010_Neurobiol.Learn.Mem_93_522
PubMedSearch : de Bruin_2010_Neurobiol.Learn.Mem_93_522
PubMedID: 20132903

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
Author(s) : Salanoubat M , Lemcke K , Rieger M , Ansorge W , Unseld M , Fartmann B , Valle G , Blocker H , Perez-Alonso M , Obermaier B , Delseny M , Boutry M , Grivell LA , Mache R , Puigdomenech P , de Simone V , Choisne N , Artiguenave F , Robert C , Brottier P , Wincker P , Cattolico L , Weissenbach J , Saurin W , Quetier F , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Benes V , Wurmbach E , Drzonek H , Erfle H , Jordan N , Bangert S , Wiedelmann R , Kranz H , Voss H , Holland R , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Vezzi A , D'Angelo M , Pallavicini A , Toppo S , Simionati B , Conrad A , Hornischer K , Kauer G , Lohnert TH , Nordsiek G , Reichelt J , Scharfe M , Schon O , Bargues M , Terol J , Climent J , Navarro P , Collado C , Perez-Perez A , Ottenwalder B , Duchemin D , Cooke R , Laudie M , Berger-Llauro C , Purnelle B , Masuy D , de Haan M , Maarse AC , Alcaraz JP , Cottet A , Casacuberta E , Monfort A , Argiriou A , Flores M , Liguori R , Vitale D , Mannhaupt G , Haase D , Schoof H , Rudd S , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Mayer KF , Kaul S , Town CD , Koo HL , Tallon LJ , Jenkins J , Rooney T , Rizzo M , Walts A , Utterback T , Fujii CY , Shea TP , Creasy TH , Haas B , Maiti R , Wu D , Peterson J , Van Aken S , Pai G , Militscher J , Sellers P , Gill JE , Feldblyum TV , Preuss D , Lin X , Nierman WC , Salzberg SL , White O , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Sato S , Kato T , Asamizu E , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Idesawa K , Kawashima K , Kishida Y , Kiyokawa C , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Tabata S
Ref : Nature , 408 :820 , 2000
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedSearch : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedID: 11130713
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-MES17 , arath-AT3G12150 , arath-At3g61680 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CXE12 , arath-eds1 , arath-SCP25 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F1P2.140 , arath-F11F8.28 , arath-F14D17.80 , arath-F16B3.4 , arath-SCP27 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-At3g05600 , arath-PAD4 , arath-At3g51000 , arath-SCP16 , arath-gid1 , arath-GID1B , arath-Q9LUG8 , arath-Q84JS1 , arath-Q9SFF6 , arath-q9m236 , arath-q9sr22 , arath-q9sr23 , arath-SCP7 , arath-SCP14 , arath-SCP15 , arath-SCP17 , arath-SCP36 , arath-SCP37 , arath-SCP39 , arath-SCP40 , arath-SCP49 , arath-T19F11.2

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 4 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
Author(s) : Mayer K , Schuller C , Wambutt R , Murphy G , Volckaert G , Pohl T , Dusterhoft A , Stiekema W , Entian KD , Terryn N , Harris B , Ansorge W , Brandt P , Grivell L , Rieger M , Weichselgartner M , de Simone V , Obermaier B , Mache R , Muller M , Kreis M , Delseny M , Puigdomenech P , Watson M , Schmidtheini T , Reichert B , Portatelle D , Perez-Alonso M , Boutry M , Bancroft I , Vos P , Hoheisel J , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Ridley P , Langham SA , McCullagh B , Bilham L , Robben J , Van der Schueren J , Grymonprez B , Chuang YJ , Vandenbussche F , Braeken M , Weltjens I , Voet M , Bastiaens I , Aert R , Defoor E , Weitzenegger T , Bothe G , Ramsperger U , Hilbert H , Braun M , Holzer E , Brandt A , Peters S , van Staveren M , Dirske W , Mooijman P , Klein Lankhorst R , Rose M , Hauf J , Kotter P , Berneiser S , Hempel S , Feldpausch M , Lamberth S , Van den Daele H , De Keyser A , Buysshaert C , Gielen J , Villarroel R , De Clercq R , van Montagu M , Rogers J , Cronin A , Quail M , Bray-Allen S , Clark L , Doggett J , Hall S , Kay M , Lennard N , McLay K , Mayes R , Pettett A , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Benes V , Rechmann S , Borkova D , Blocker H , Scharfe M , Grimm M , Lohnert TH , Dose S , de Haan M , Maarse A , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Fartmann B , Granderath K , Dauner D , Herzl A , Neumann S , Argiriou A , Vitale D , Liguori R , Piravandi E , Massenet O , Quigley F , Clabauld G , Mundlein A , Felber R , Schnabl S , Hiller R , Schmidt W , Lecharny A , Aubourg S , Chefdor F , Cooke R , Berger C , Montfort A , Casacuberta E , Gibbons T , Weber N , Vandenbol M , Bargues M , Terol J , Torres A , Perez-Perez A , Purnelle B , Bent E , Johnson S , Tacon D , Jesse T , Heijnen L , Schwarz S , Scholler P , Heber S , Francs P , Bielke C , Frishman D , Haase D , Lemcke K , Mewes HW , Stocker S , Zaccaria P , Bevan M , Wilson RK , de la Bastide M , Habermann K , Parnell L , Dedhia N , Gnoj L , Schutz K , Huang E , Spiegel L , Sehkon M , Murray J , Sheet P , Cordes M , Abu-Threideh J , Stoneking T , Kalicki J , Graves T , Harmon G , Edwards J , Latreille P , Courtney L , Cloud J , Abbott A , Scott K , Johnson D , Minx P , Bentley D , Fulton B , Miller N , Greco T , Kemp K , Kramer J , Fulton L , Mardis E , Dante M , Pepin K , Hillier L , Nelson J , Spieth J , Ryan E , Andrews S , Geisel C , Layman D , Du H , Ali J , Berghoff A , Jones K , Drone K , Cotton M , Joshu C , Antonoiu B , Zidanic M , Strong C , Sun H , Lamar B , Yordan C , Ma P , Zhong J , Preston R , Vil D , Shekher M , Matero A , Shah R , Swaby IK , O'Shaughnessy A , Rodriguez M , Hoffmann J , Till S , Granat S , Shohdy N , Hasegawa A , Hameed A , Lodhi M , Johnson A , Chen E , Marra M , Martienssen R , McCombie WR
Ref : Nature , 402 :769 , 1999
Abstract : The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the sequence of chromosome 4. Analysis of 17.38 megabases of unique sequence, representing about 17% of the genome, reveals 3,744 protein coding genes, 81 transfer RNAs and numerous repeat elements. Heterochromatic regions surrounding the putative centromere, which has not yet been completely sequenced, are characterized by an increased frequency of a variety of repeats, new repeats, reduced recombination, lowered gene density and lowered gene expression. Roughly 60% of the predicted protein-coding genes have been functionally characterized on the basis of their homology to known genes. Many genes encode predicted proteins that are homologous to human and Caenorhabditis elegans proteins.
ESTHER : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedSearch : Mayer_1999_Nature_402_769
PubMedID: 10617198
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT4G00500 , arath-AT4G16690 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-AT4g30610 , arath-o65513 , arath-o65713 , arath-LPAAT , arath-f4jt64

Title : The nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XV - Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
Author(s) : Dujon B , Albermann K , Aldea M , Alexandraki D , Ansorge W , Arino J , Benes V , Bohn C , Bolotin-Fukuhara M , Bordonne R , Boyer J , Camasses A , Casamayor A , Casas C , Cheret G , Cziepluch C , Daignan-Fornier B , Dang DV , de Haan M , Delius H , Durand P , Fairhead C , Feldmann H , Gaillon L , Galisson F , Gamo FJ , Gancedo C , Goffeau A , Goulding SE , Grivell LA , Habbig B , Hand NJ , Hani J , Hattenhorst U , Hebling U , Hernando Y , Herrero E , Heumann K , Hiesel R , Hilger F , Hofmann B , Hollenberg CP , Hughes B , Jauniaux JC , Kalogeropoulos A , Katsoulou C , Kordes E , Lafuente MJ , Landt O , Louis EJ , Maarse AC , Madania A , Mannhaupt G , Marck C , Martin RP , Mewes HW , Michaux G , Paces V , Parle-McDermott AG , Pearson BM , Perrin A , Pettersson B , Poch O , Pohl TM , Poirey R , Portetelle D , Pujol A , Purnelle B , Ramezani Rad M , Rechmann S , Schwager C , Schweizer M , Sor F , Sterky F , Tarassov IA , Teodoru C , Tettelin H , Thierry A , Tobiasch E , Tzermia M , Uhlen M , Unseld M , Valens M , Vandenbol M , Vetter I , Vlcek C , Voet M , Volckaert G , Voss H , Wambutt R , Wedler H , Wiemann S , Winsor B , Wolfe KH , Zollner A , Zumstein E , Kleine K
Ref : Nature , 387 :98 , 1997
Abstract : Chromosome XV was one of the last two chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be discovered. It is the third-largest yeast chromosome after chromosomes XII and IV, and is very similar in size to chromosome VII. It alone represents 9% of the yeast genome (8% if ribosomal DNA is included). When systematic sequencing of chromosome XV was started, 93 genes or markers were identified, and most of them were mapped. However, very little else was known about chromosome XV which, in contrast to shorter chromosomes, had not been the object of comprehensive genetic or molecular analysis. It was therefore decided to start sequencing chromosome XV only in the third phase of the European Yeast Genome Sequencing Programme, after experience was gained on chromosomes III, XI and II. The sequence of chromosome XV has been determined from a set of partly overlapping cosmid clones derived from a unique yeast strain, and physically mapped at 3.3-kilobase resolution before sequencing. As well as numerous new open reading frames (ORFs) and genes encoding tRNA or small RNA molecules, the sequence of 1,091,283 base pairs confirms the high proportion of orphan genes and reveals a number of ancestral and successive duplications with other yeast chromosomes.
ESTHER : Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
PubMedSearch : Dujon_1997_Nature_387_98
PubMedID: 9169874
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-FSH3 , yeast-yo059

Title : Complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X - Galibert_1996_EMBO.J_15_2031
Author(s) : Galibert F , Alexandraki D , Baur A , Boles E , Chalwatzis N , Chuat JC , Coster F , Cziepluch C , de Haan M , Domdey H , Durand P , Entian KD , Gatius M , Goffeau A , Grivell LA , Hennemann A , Herbert CJ , Heumann K , Hilger F , Hollenberg CP , Huang ME , Jacq C , Jauniaux JC , Katsoulou C , Karpfinger-Hartl L , et al.
Ref : EMBO Journal , 15 :2031 , 1996
Abstract : The complete nucleotide sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome X (745 442 bp) reveals a total of 379 open reading frames (ORFs), the coding region covering approximately 75% of the entire sequence. One hundred and eighteen ORFs (31%) correspond to genes previously identified in S. cerevisiae. All other ORFs represent novel putative yeast genes, whose function will have to be determined experimentally. However, 57 of the latter subset (another 15% of the total) encode proteins that show significant analogy to proteins of known function from yeast or other organisms. The remaining ORFs, exhibiting no significant similarity to any known sequence, amount to 54% of the total. General features of chromosome X are also reported, with emphasis on the nucleotide frequency distribution in the environment of the ATG and stop codons, the possible coding capacity of at least some of the small ORFs (<100 codons) and the significance of 46 non-canonical or unpaired nucleotides in the stems of some of the 24 tRNA genes recognized on this chromosome.
ESTHER : Galibert_1996_EMBO.J_15_2031
PubMedSearch : Galibert_1996_EMBO.J_15_2031
PubMedID: 8641269
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-yj68 , yeast-yj77 , yeast-yjg8

Title : Complete DNA sequence of yeast chromosome II - Feldmann_1994_EMBO.J_13_5795
Author(s) : Feldmann H , Aigle M , Aljinovic G , Andre B , Baclet MC , Barthe C , Baur A , Becam AM , Biteau N , Boles E , Brandt T , Brendel M , Bruckner M , Bussereau F , Christiansen C , Contreras R , Crouzet M , Cziepluch C , Demolis N , Delaveau T , Doignon F , Domdey H , Dusterhus S , Dubois E , Dujon B , El Bakkoury M , Entian KD , Feurmann M , Fiers W , Fobo GM , Fritz C , Gassenhuber H , Glandsdorff N , Goffeau A , Grivell LA , de Haan M , Hein C , Herbert CJ , Hollenberg CP , Holmstrom K , Jacq C , Jacquet M , Jauniaux JC , Jonniaux JL , Kallesoe T , Kiesau P , Kirchrath L , Kotter P , Korol S , Liebl S , Logghe M , Lohan AJ , Louis EJ , Li ZY , Maat MJ , Mallet L , Mannhaupt G , Messenguy F , Miosga T , Molemans F , Muller S , Nasr F , Obermaier B , Perea J , Pierard A , Piravandi E , Pohl FM , Pohl TM , Potier S , Proft M , Purnelle B , Ramezani Rad M , Rieger M , Rose M , Schaaff-Gerstenschlager I , Scherens B , Schwarzlose C , Skala J , Slonimski PP , Smits PH , Souciet JL , Steensma HY , Stucka R , Urrestarazu A , van der Aart QJ , van Dyck L , Vassarotti A , Vetter I , Vierendeels F , Vissers S , Wagner G , de Wergifosse P , Wolfe KH , Zagulski M , Zimmermann FK , Mewes HW , Kleine K , Dsterhus S , Mller S , Pirard A , Schaaff-Gerstenschlger I
Ref : EMBO Journal , 13 :5795 , 1994
Abstract : In the framework of the EU genome-sequencing programmes, the complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome II (807 188 bp) has been determined. At present, this is the largest eukaryotic chromosome entirely sequenced. A total of 410 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, covering 72% of the sequence. Similarity searches revealed that 124 ORFs (30%) correspond to genes of known function, 51 ORFs (12.5%) appear to be homologues of genes whose functions are known, 52 others (12.5%) have homologues the functions of which are not well defined and another 33 of the novel putative genes (8%) exhibit a degree of similarity which is insufficient to confidently assign function. Of the genes on chromosome II, 37-45% are thus of unpredicted function. Among the novel putative genes, we found several that are related to genes that perform differentiated functions in multicellular organisms of are involved in malignancy. In addition to a compact arrangement of potential protein coding sequences, the analysis of this chromosome confirmed general chromosome patterns but also revealed particular novel features of chromosomal organization. Alternating regional variations in average base composition correlate with variations in local gene density along chromosome II, as observed in chromosomes XI and III. We propose that functional ARS elements are preferably located in the AT-rich regions that have a spacing of approximately 110 kb. Similarly, the 13 tRNA genes and the three Ty elements of chromosome II are found in AT-rich regions. In chromosome II, the distribution of coding sequences between the two strands is biased, with a ratio of 1.3:1. An interesting aspect regarding the evolution of the eukaryotic genome is the finding that chromosome II has a high degree of internal genetic redundancy, amounting to 16% of the coding capacity.
ESTHER : Feldmann_1994_EMBO.J_13_5795
PubMedSearch : Feldmann_1994_EMBO.J_13_5795
PubMedID: 7813418
Gene_locus related to this paper: yeast-LDH1 , yeast-MCFS2 , yeast-yby9