Tait A

References (4)

Title : Multiple genetic mechanisms lead to loss of functional TbAT1 expression in drug-resistant trypanosomes - Stewart_2010_Eukaryot.Cell_9_336
Author(s) : Stewart ML , Burchmore RJ , Clucas C , Hertz-Fowler C , Brooks K , Tait A , MacLeod A , Turner CM , De Koning HP , Wong PE , Barrett MP
Ref : Eukaryot Cell , 9 :336 , 2010
Abstract : The P2 aminopurine transporter, encoded by TbAT1 in African trypanosomes in the Trypanosoma brucei group, carries melaminophenyl arsenical and diamidine drugs into these parasites. Loss of this transporter contributes to drug resistance. We identified the genomic location of TbAT1 to be in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 5 and determined the status of the TbAT1 gene in two trypanosome lines selected for resistance to the melaminophenyl arsenical, melarsamine hydrochloride (Cymelarsan), and in a Trypanosoma equiperdum clone selected for resistance to the diamidine, diminazene aceturate. In the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense STIB 386 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant line, TbAT1 is deleted, while in the Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 247 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant and T. equiperdum diminazene-resistant lines, TbAT1 is present, but expression at the RNA level is no longer detectable. Further characterization of TbAT1 in T. equiperdum revealed that a loss of heterozygosity at the TbAT1 locus accompanied loss of expression and that P2-mediated uptake of [(3)H]diminazene is lost in drug-resistant T. equiperdum. Adenine-inhibitable adenosine uptake is still detectable in a DeltaTbat1 T. b. brucei mutant, although at a greatly reduced capacity compared to that of the wild type, indicating that an additional adenine-inhibitable adenosine permease, distinct from P2, is present in these cells.
ESTHER : Stewart_2010_Eukaryot.Cell_9_336
PubMedSearch : Stewart_2010_Eukaryot.Cell_9_336
PubMedID: 19966032
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-b2zwb5

Title : Genome of the host-cell transforming parasite Theileria annulata compared with T. parva - Pain_2005_Science_309_131
Author(s) : Pain A , Renauld H , Berriman M , Murphy L , Yeats CA , Weir W , Kerhornou A , Aslett M , Bishop R , Bouchier C , Cochet M , Coulson RM , Cronin A , de Villiers EP , Fraser A , Fosker N , Gardner M , Goble A , Griffiths-Jones S , Harris DE , Katzer F , Larke N , Lord A , Maser P , McKellar S , Mooney P , Morton F , Nene V , O'Neil S , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlings ND , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Shah T , Squares R , Squares S , Tivey A , Walker AR , Woodward J , Dobbelaere DA , Langsley G , Rajandream MA , McKeever D , Shiels B , Tait A , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Science , 309 :131 , 2005
Abstract : Theileria annulata and T. parva are closely related protozoan parasites that cause lymphoproliferative diseases of cattle. We sequenced the genome of T. annulata and compared it with that of T. parva to understand the mechanisms underlying transformation and tropism. Despite high conservation of gene sequences and synteny, the analysis reveals unequally expanded gene families and species-specific genes. We also identify divergent families of putative secreted polypeptides that may reduce immune recognition, candidate regulators of host-cell transformation, and a Theileria-specific protein domain [frequently associated in Theileria (FAINT)] present in a large number of secreted proteins.
ESTHER : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedSearch : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedID: 15994557
Gene_locus related to this paper: thean-q4u9u6 , thean-q4ub48 , thean-q4ubz1 , thean-q4uc78 , thean-q4uc93 , thean-q4uck1 , thean-q4udw9 , thean-q4ue56 , thean-q4uf06 , thean-q4ug98 , thean-q4uhj9 , thepa-q4n349

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : The DNA sequence of chromosome I of an African trypanosome: gene content, chromosome organisation, recombination and polymorphism - Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
Author(s) : Hall N , Berriman M , Lennard NJ , Harris BR , Hertz-Fowler C , Bart-Delabesse EN , Gerrard CS , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bowman S , Bray-Allen SP , Bringaud F , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies R , Doggett J , Fraser A , Gruter E , Hall S , Harper AD , Kay MP , Leech V , Mayes R , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Reitter C , Rutherford K , Sasse J , Sharp S , Shownkeen R , MacLeod A , Taylor S , Tweedie A , Turner CM , Tait A , Gull K , Barrell B , Melville SE
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 31 :4864 , 2003
Abstract : The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, causes sleeping sickness in humans in sub-Saharan Africa. Here we report the sequence and analysis of the 1.1 Mb chromosome I, which encodes approximately 400 predicted genes organised into directional clusters, of which more than 100 are located in the largest cluster of 250 kb. A 160-kb region consists primarily of three gene families of unknown function, one of which contains a hotspot for retroelement insertion. We also identify five novel gene families. Indeed, almost 20% of predicted genes are members of families. In some cases, tandemly arrayed genes are 99-100% identical, suggesting an active process of amplification and gene conversion. One end of the chromosome consists of a putative bloodstream-form variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site that appears truncated and degenerate. The other chromosome end carries VSG and expression site-associated genes and pseudogenes over 50 kb of subtelomeric sequence where, unusually, the telomere-proximal VSG gene is oriented away from the telomere. Our analysis includes the cataloguing of minor genetic variations between the chromosome I homologues and an estimate of crossing-over frequency during genetic exchange. Genetic polymorphisms are exceptionally rare in sequences located within and around the strand-switches between several gene clusters.
ESTHER : Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
PubMedSearch : Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
PubMedID: 12907729
Gene_locus related to this paper: trybr-CHR1.244 , trybr-CHR1.412 , trybr-Q4GYA0