Fraser A

References (17)

Title : Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes - Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
Author(s) : Sebaihia M , Peck MW , Minton NP , Thomson NR , Holden MT , Mitchell WJ , Carter AT , Bentley SD , Mason DR , Crossman L , Paul CJ , Ivens A , Wells-Bennik MH , Davis IJ , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Churcher C , Quail MA , Chillingworth T , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Jagels K , Larke N , Maddison M , Moule S , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Rabbinowitsch E , Sanders M , Simmonds M , White B , Whithead S , Parkhill J
Ref : Genome Res , 17 :1082 , 2007
Abstract : Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues.
ESTHER : Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
PubMedSearch : Sebaihia_2007_Genome.Res_17_1082
PubMedID: 17519437
Gene_locus related to this paper: clobh-A5I3I2 , clobh-A51055 , clob1-a7fqm2 , clob1-a7fv94 , clobl-a7gbn0 , clobh-pip , clobh-a5i3m0

Title : Comparative genomic analysis of three Leishmania species that cause diverse human disease - Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
Author(s) : Peacock CS , Seeger K , Harris D , Murphy L , Ruiz JC , Quail MA , Peters N , Adlem E , Tivey A , Aslett M , Kerhornou A , Ivens A , Fraser A , Rajandream MA , Carver T , Norbertczak H , Chillingworth T , Hance Z , Jagels K , Moule S , Ormond D , Rutter S , Squares R , Whitehead S , Rabbinowitsch E , Arrowsmith C , White B , Thurston S , Bringaud F , Baldauf SL , Faulconbridge A , Jeffares D , Depledge DP , Oyola SO , Hilley JD , Brito LO , Tosi LR , Barrell B , Cruz AK , Mottram JC , Smith DF , Berriman M
Ref : Nat Genet , 39 :839 , 2007
Abstract : Leishmania parasites cause a broad spectrum of clinical disease. Here we report the sequencing of the genomes of two species of Leishmania: Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis. The comparison of these sequences with the published genome of Leishmania major reveals marked conservation of synteny and identifies only approximately 200 genes with a differential distribution between the three species. L. braziliensis, contrary to Leishmania species examined so far, possesses components of a putative RNA-mediated interference pathway, telomere-associated transposable elements and spliced leader-associated SLACS retrotransposons. We show that pseudogene formation and gene loss are the principal forces shaping the different genomes. Genes that are differentially distributed between the species encode proteins implicated in host-pathogen interactions and parasite survival in the macrophage.
ESTHER : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedSearch : Peacock_2007_Nat.Genet_39_839
PubMedID: 17572675
Gene_locus related to this paper: leibr-a4h6l0 , leibr-a4h6l1 , leibr-a4h9b6 , leibr-a4h908 , leibr-a4h956 , leibr-a4h959 , leibr-a4h960 , leibr-a4hen1 , leibr-a4hf07 , leibr-a4hgl0 , leibr-a4hhu6 , leibr-a4hj94 , leibr-a4hk72 , leibr-a4hpa8 , leibr-a4hpz5 , leiin-a4huz4 , leiin-a4hxe0 , leiin-a4hxh8 , leiin-a4hxi1 , leiin-a4hxn7 , leiin-a4hyv9 , leiin-a4i1v9 , leiin-a4i4z6 , leiin-a4i6n9 , leiin-a4i7q7 , leiin-a4idl6 , leima-e9ady6 , leima-OPB , leima-q4q0t5 , leima-q4q8a8 , leima-q4q398 , leima-q4q942 , leima-q4qe85 , leima-q4qe86 , leima-q4qj45

Title : The multidrug-resistant human pathogen Clostridium difficile has a highly mobile, mosaic genome - Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
Author(s) : Sebaihia M , Wren BW , Mullany P , Fairweather NF , Minton N , Stabler R , Thomson NR , Roberts AP , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Wang H , Holden MT , Wright A , Churcher C , Quail MA , Baker S , Bason N , Brooks K , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Davis P , Dowd L , Fraser A , Feltwell T , Hance Z , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Moule S , Mungall K , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Stevens K , Unwin L , Whithead S , Dupuy B , Dougan G , Barrell B , Parkhill J
Ref : Nat Genet , 38 :779 , 2006
Abstract : We determined the complete genome sequence of Clostridium difficile strain 630, a virulent and multidrug-resistant strain. Our analysis indicates that a large proportion (11%) of the genome consists of mobile genetic elements, mainly in the form of conjugative transposons. These mobile elements are putatively responsible for the acquisition by C. difficile of an extensive array of genes involved in antimicrobial resistance, virulence, host interaction and the production of surface structures. The metabolic capabilities encoded in the genome show multiple adaptations for survival and growth within the gut environment. The extreme genome variability was confirmed by whole-genome microarray analysis; it may reflect the organism's niche in the gut and should provide information on the evolution of virulence in this organism.
ESTHER : Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
PubMedSearch : Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
PubMedID: 16804543
Gene_locus related to this paper: pepdi-t4eki5 , clod6-q18a60 , clod6-q183v0 , clodi-HYDD , clodr-c9ynf2 , pepd6-pip , pepdi-g6brr4

Title : The genome of Rhizobium leguminosarum has recognizable core and accessory components - Young_2006_Genome.Biol_7_R34
Author(s) : Young JP , Crossman LC , Johnston AW , Thomson NR , Ghazoui ZF , Hull KH , Wexler M , Curson AR , Todd JD , Poole PS , Mauchline TH , East AK , Quail MA , Churcher C , Arrowsmith C , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Clarke K , Cronin A , Davis P , Fraser A , Hance Z , Hauser H , Jagels K , Moule S , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Rabbinowitsch E , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Whitehead S , Parkhill J
Ref : Genome Biol , 7 :R34 , 2006
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Rhizobium leguminosarum is an alpha-proteobacterial N2-fixing symbiont of legumes that has been the subject of more than a thousand publications. Genes for the symbiotic interaction with plants are well studied, but the adaptations that allow survival and growth in the soil environment are poorly understood. We have sequenced the genome of R. leguminosarum biovar viciae strain 3841. RESULTS: The 7.75 Mb genome comprises a circular chromosome and six circular plasmids, with 61% G+C overall. All three rRNA operons and 52 tRNA genes are on the chromosome; essential protein-encoding genes are largely chromosomal, but most functional classes occur on plasmids as well. Of the 7,263 protein-encoding genes, 2,056 had orthologs in each of three related genomes (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Mesorhizobium loti), and these genes were over-represented in the chromosome and had above average G+C. Most supported the rRNA-based phylogeny, confirming A. tumefaciens to be the closest among these relatives, but 347 genes were incompatible with this phylogeny; these were scattered throughout the genome but were over-represented on the plasmids. An unexpectedly large number of genes were shared by all three rhizobia but were missing from A. tumefaciens. CONCLUSION: Overall, the genome can be considered to have two main components: a 'core', which is higher in G+C, is mostly chromosomal, is shared with related organisms, and has a consistent phylogeny; and an 'accessory' component, which is sporadic in distribution, lower in G+C, and located on the plasmids and chromosomal islands. The accessory genome has a different nucleotide composition from the core despite a long history of coexistence.
ESTHER : Young_2006_Genome.Biol_7_R34
PubMedSearch : Young_2006_Genome.Biol_7_R34
PubMedID: 16640791
Gene_locus related to this paper: rhiec-q2k7y0 , rhiec-q2k107 , rhiec-q2kav5 , rhiec-q2ke86 , rhil3-q1m3b7 , rhil3-q1m3u0 , rhil3-q1m4b4 , rhil3-q1m4e5 , rhil3-q1m4g3 , rhil3-q1m4h0 , rhil3-q1m5k0 , rhil3-q1m5s6 , rhil3-q1m6q0 , rhil3-q1m6u8 , rhil3-q1m6w8 , rhil3-q1m7c2 , rhil3-q1m7c3 , rhil3-q1m7i2 , rhil3-q1m7n3 , rhil3-q1m7q9 , rhil3-q1m7r8 , rhil3-q1m8d0 , rhil3-q1m8u4 , rhil3-q1m9d6 , rhil3-q1m9i6 , rhil3-q1m347 , rhil3-q1m571 , rhil3-q1m580 , rhil3-q1m672 , rhil3-q1m812 , rhil3-q1m841 , rhil3-q1m917 , rhil3-q1m919 , rhil3-q1mbv4 , rhil3-q1mbz5 , rhil3-q1mc48 , rhil3-q1mcr4 , rhil3-q1md19 , rhil3-q1mdd8 , rhil3-q1me05 , rhil3-q1mee4 , rhil3-q1mel6 , rhil3-q1men7 , rhil3-q1mf17 , rhil3-q1mf73 , rhil3-q1mf76 , rhil3-q1mfb0 , rhil3-q1mfp5 , rhil3-q1mg17 , rhil3-q1mg51 , rhil3-q1mg97 , rhil3-q1mgh3 , rhil3-q1mgh5 , rhil3-q1mgu7 , rhil3-q1mgx5 , rhil3-q1mh67 , rhil3-q1mhh7 , rhil3-q1mhz8 , rhil3-q1mi67 , rhil3-q1mi98 , rhil3-q1mia3 , rhil3-q1mig2 , rhil3-q1miz0 , rhil3-q1mj26 , rhil3-q1mj65 , rhil3-q1mjs2 , rhil3-q1mjx4 , rhil3-q1mk84 , rhil3-q1mkk8 , rhil3-q1mli7 , rhil3-q1mlj7 , rhil3-q1mm33 , rhil3-q1mmf9 , rhil3-q1mmp7 , rhil3-q1mmx0 , rhil3-q1mn42 , rhile-Q93EA8 , rhils-c6axl5 , rhils-c6b1w7 , rhilw-b5zrm4 , rhilw-b5zs97 , rhilv-j0vcs5

Title : Common inheritance of chromosome Ia associated with clonal expansion of Toxoplasma gondii - Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
Author(s) : Khan A , Bohme U , Kelly KA , Adlem E , Brooks K , Simmonds M , Mungall K , Quail MA , Arrowsmith C , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Harris D , Collins M , Fosker N , Fraser A , Hance Z , Jagels K , Moule S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Rajandream MA , Saunders D , Seeger K , Whitehead S , Mayr T , Xuan X , Watanabe J , Suzuki Y , Wakaguri H , Sugano S , Sugimoto C , Paulsen I , Mackey AJ , Roos DS , Hall N , Berriman M , Barrell B , Sibley LD , Ajioka JW
Ref : Genome Res , 16 :1119 , 2006
Abstract : Toxoplasma gondii is a globally distributed protozoan parasite that can infect virtually all warm-blooded animals and humans. Despite the existence of a sexual phase in the life cycle, T. gondii has an unusual population structure dominated by three clonal lineages that predominate in North America and Europe, (Types I, II, and III). These lineages were founded by common ancestors approximately10,000 yr ago. The recent origin and widespread distribution of the clonal lineages is attributed to the circumvention of the sexual cycle by a new mode of transmission-asexual transmission between intermediate hosts. Asexual transmission appears to be multigenic and although the specific genes mediating this trait are unknown, it is predicted that all members of the clonal lineages should share the same alleles. Genetic mapping studies suggested that chromosome Ia was unusually monomorphic compared with the rest of the genome. To investigate this further, we sequenced chromosome Ia and chromosome Ib in the Type I strain, RH, and the Type II strain, ME49. Comparative genome analyses of the two chromosomal sequences revealed that the same copy of chromosome Ia was inherited in each lineage, whereas chromosome Ib maintained the same high frequency of between-strain polymorphism as the rest of the genome. Sampling of chromosome Ia sequence in seven additional representative strains from the three clonal lineages supports a monomorphic inheritance, which is unique within the genome. Taken together, our observations implicate a specific combination of alleles on chromosome Ia in the recent origin and widespread success of the clonal lineages of T. gondii.
ESTHER : Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
PubMedSearch : Khan_2006_Genome.Res_16_1119
PubMedID: 16902086
Gene_locus related to this paper: toxgo-q1jt22

Title : Genome of the host-cell transforming parasite Theileria annulata compared with T. parva - Pain_2005_Science_309_131
Author(s) : Pain A , Renauld H , Berriman M , Murphy L , Yeats CA , Weir W , Kerhornou A , Aslett M , Bishop R , Bouchier C , Cochet M , Coulson RM , Cronin A , de Villiers EP , Fraser A , Fosker N , Gardner M , Goble A , Griffiths-Jones S , Harris DE , Katzer F , Larke N , Lord A , Maser P , McKellar S , Mooney P , Morton F , Nene V , O'Neil S , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlings ND , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Shah T , Squares R , Squares S , Tivey A , Walker AR , Woodward J , Dobbelaere DA , Langsley G , Rajandream MA , McKeever D , Shiels B , Tait A , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Science , 309 :131 , 2005
Abstract : Theileria annulata and T. parva are closely related protozoan parasites that cause lymphoproliferative diseases of cattle. We sequenced the genome of T. annulata and compared it with that of T. parva to understand the mechanisms underlying transformation and tropism. Despite high conservation of gene sequences and synteny, the analysis reveals unequally expanded gene families and species-specific genes. We also identify divergent families of putative secreted polypeptides that may reduce immune recognition, candidate regulators of host-cell transformation, and a Theileria-specific protein domain [frequently associated in Theileria (FAINT)] present in a large number of secreted proteins.
ESTHER : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedSearch : Pain_2005_Science_309_131
PubMedID: 15994557
Gene_locus related to this paper: thean-q4u9u6 , thean-q4ub48 , thean-q4ubz1 , thean-q4uc78 , thean-q4uc93 , thean-q4uck1 , thean-q4udw9 , thean-q4ue56 , thean-q4uf06 , thean-q4ug98 , thean-q4uhj9 , thepa-q4n349

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Pain A , Anderson MJ , Wortman JR , Kim HS , Arroyo J , Berriman M , Abe K , Archer DB , Bermejo C , Bennett J , Bowyer P , Chen D , Collins M , Coulsen R , Davies R , Dyer PS , Farman M , Fedorova N , Feldblyum TV , Fischer R , Fosker N , Fraser A , Garcia JL , Garcia MJ , Goble A , Goldman GH , Gomi K , Griffith-Jones S , Gwilliam R , Haas B , Haas H , Harris D , Horiuchi H , Huang J , Humphray S , Jimenez J , Keller N , Khouri H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Konzack S , Kulkarni R , Kumagai T , Lafon A , Latge JP , Li W , Lord A , Lu C , Majoros WH , May GS , Miller BL , Mohamoud Y , Molina M , Monod M , Mouyna I , Mulligan S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Paulsen I , Penalva MA , Pertea M , Price C , Pritchard BL , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlins N , Rajandream MA , Reichard U , Renauld H , Robson GD , Rodriguez de Cordoba S , Rodriguez-Pena JM , Ronning CM , Rutter S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez M , Sanchez-Ferrero JC , Saunders D , Seeger K , Squares R , Squares S , Takeuchi M , Tekaia F , Turner G , Vazquez de Aldana CR , Weidman J , White O , Woodward J , Yu JH , Fraser C , Galagan JE , Asai K , Machida M , Hall N , Barrell B , Denning DW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1151 , 2005
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedID: 16372009
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-apth1 , aspfu-axe1 , aspfu-CBPYA , aspfu-faec , aspfu-kex1 , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4wa39 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wkh6 , aspfu-q4wnx3 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q5vjg7 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspfu-fmac

Title : The genome of the kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania major - Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
Author(s) : Ivens AC , Peacock CS , Worthey EA , Murphy L , Aggarwal G , Berriman M , Sisk E , Rajandream MA , Adlem E , Aert R , Anupama A , Apostolou Z , Attipoe P , Bason N , Bauser C , Beck A , Beverley SM , Bianchettin G , Borzym K , Bothe G , Bruschi CV , Collins M , Cadag E , Ciarloni L , Clayton C , Coulson RM , Cronin A , Cruz AK , Davies RM , De Gaudenzi J , Dobson DE , Duesterhoeft A , Fazelina G , Fosker N , Frasch AC , Fraser A , Fuchs M , Gabel C , Goble A , Goffeau A , Harris D , Hertz-Fowler C , Hilbert H , Horn D , Huang Y , Klages S , Knights A , Kube M , Larke N , Litvin L , Lord A , Louie T , Marra M , Masuy D , Matthews K , Michaeli S , Mottram JC , Muller-Auer S , Munden H , Nelson S , Norbertczak H , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pentony M , Pohl TM , Price C , Purnelle B , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Reinhardt R , Rieger M , Rinta J , Robben J , Robertson L , Ruiz JC , Rutter S , Saunders D , Schafer M , Schein J , Schwartz DC , Seeger K , Seyler A , Sharp S , Shin H , Sivam D , Squares R , Squares S , Tosato V , Vogt C , Volckaert G , Wambutt R , Warren T , Wedler H , Woodward J , Zhou S , Zimmermann W , Smith DF , Blackwell JM , Stuart KD , Barrell B , Myler PJ
Ref : Science , 309 :436 , 2005
Abstract : Leishmania species cause a spectrum of human diseases in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. We have sequenced the 36 chromosomes of the 32.8-megabase haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) and predict 911 RNA genes, 39 pseudogenes, and 8272 protein-coding genes, of which 36% can be ascribed a putative function. These include genes involved in host-pathogen interactions, such as proteolytic enzymes, and extensive machinery for synthesis of complex surface glycoconjugates. The organization of protein-coding genes into long, strand-specific, polycistronic clusters and lack of general transcription factors in the L. major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Tritryp) genomes suggest that the mechanisms regulating RNA polymerase II-directed transcription are distinct from those operating in other eukaryotes, although the trypanosomatids appear capable of chromatin remodeling. Abundant RNA-binding proteins are encoded in the Tritryp genomes, consistent with active posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression.
ESTHER : Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
PubMedSearch : Ivens_2005_Science_309_436
PubMedID: 16020728
Gene_locus related to this paper: leima-e9ady6 , leima-L2464.12 , leima-L2802.02 , leima-OPB , leima-q4fw33 , leima-q4fwg8 , leima-q4fwj0 , leima-q4fya7 , leima-q4q0a1 , leima-q4q0t5 , leima-q4q0v0 , leima-q4q1h9 , leima-q4q2c9 , leima-q4q4j7 , leima-q4q4t6 , leima-q4q5j1 , leima-q4q6e9 , leima-q4q7v8 , leima-q4q8a8 , leima-q4q9g9 , leima-q4q080 , leima-q4q398 , leima-q4q615 , leima-q4q819 , leima-q4q871 , leima-q4q942 , leima-q4qae7 , leima-q4qb85 , leima-q4qdz7 , leima-q4qe26 , leima-q4qe31 , leima-q4qe85 , leima-q4qe86 , leima-q4qe87 , leima-q4qe90 , leima-q4qec8 , leima-q4qgz4 , leima-q4qgz5 , leima-q4qhs0 , leima-q4qj45

Title : Genome sequence of the enterobacterial phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and characterization of virulence factors - Bell_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_11105
Author(s) : Bell KS , Sebaihia M , Pritchard L , Holden MT , Hyman LJ , Holeva MC , Thomson NR , Bentley SD , Churcher LJ , Mungall K , Atkin R , Bason N , Brooks K , Chillingworth T , Clark K , Doggett J , Fraser A , Hance Z , Hauser H , Jagels K , Moule S , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Price C , Quail MA , Sanders M , Walker D , Whitehead S , Salmond GP , Birch PR , Parkhill J , Toth IK
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :11105 , 2004
Abstract : The bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae is notable for its well studied human pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, Shigella, and Escherichia spp. However, it also contains several plant pathogens. We report the genome sequence of a plant pathogenic enterobacterium, Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) strain SCRI1043, the causative agent of soft rot and blackleg potato diseases. Approximately 33% of Eca genes are not shared with sequenced enterobacterial human pathogens, including some predicted to facilitate unexpected metabolic traits, such as nitrogen fixation and opine catabolism. This proportion of genes also contains an overrepresentation of pathogenicity determinants, including possible horizontally acquired gene clusters for putative type IV secretion and polyketide phytotoxin synthesis. To investigate whether these gene clusters play a role in the disease process, an arrayed set of insertional mutants was generated, and mutations were identified. Plant bioassays showed that these mutants were significantly reduced in virulence, demonstrating both the presence of novel pathogenicity determinants in Eca, and the impact of functional genomics in expanding our understanding of phytopathogenicity in the Enterobacteriaceae.
ESTHER : Bell_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_11105
PubMedSearch : Bell_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_11105
PubMedID: 15263089
Gene_locus related to this paper: erwct-q6czi2 , erwct-q6czl9 , erwct-q6czu1 , erwct-q6d0l3 , erwct-q6d1e3 , erwct-q6d1l9 , erwct-q6d2k4 , erwct-q6d2x2 , erwct-q6d3m9 , erwct-q6d4b7 , erwct-q6d6t8 , erwct-q6d7j1 , erwct-q6d7p5 , erwct-q6d7w3 , erwct-q6d8k2 , erwct-q6d8q7 , erwct-q6d9l2 , erwct-q6d041 , erwct-q6d134 , erwct-q6d207 , erwct-q6d508 , erwct-q6d615 , erwct-q6d673 , erwct-q6d739.1 , erwct-q6d739.2 , erwct-q6d884 , erwct-q6da42 , erwct-q6da66 , erwct-q6dac1 , erwct-q6dar9 , erwct-Y3465

Title : Insight into the genome of Aspergillus fumigatus: analysis of a 922 kb region encompassing the nitrate assimilation gene cluster - Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
Author(s) : Pain A , Woodward J , Quail MA , Anderson MJ , Clark R , Collins M , Fosker N , Fraser A , Harris D , Larke N , Murphy L , Humphray S , O'Neil S , Pertea M , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Salzberg S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Warren T , Denning DW , Barrell B , Hall N
Ref : Fungal Genet Biol , 41 :443 , 2004
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is the most ubiquitous opportunistic filamentous fungal pathogen of human. As an initial step toward sequencing the entire genome of A. fumigatus, which is estimated to be approximately 30 Mb in size, we have sequenced a 922 kb region, contained within 16 overlapping bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Fifty-four percent of the DNA is predicted to be coding with 341 putative protein coding genes. Functional classification of the proteins showed the presence of a higher proportion of enzymes and membrane transporters when compared to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to the nitrate assimilation gene cluster, the quinate utilisation gene cluster is also present on this 922 kb genomic sequence. We observed large scale synteny between A. fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans by comparing this sequence to the A. nidulans genetic map of linkage group VIII.
ESTHER : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedSearch : Pain_2004_Fungal.Genet.Biol_41_443
PubMedID: 14998527
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfu-q6my76 , aspfu-q6myf7 , aspfu-q6myz3

Title : Genomic plasticity of the causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei - Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
Author(s) : Holden MT , Titball RW , Peacock SJ , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Atkins T , Crossman LC , Pitt T , Churcher C , Mungall K , Bentley SD , Sebaihia M , Thomson NR , Bason N , Beacham IR , Brooks K , Brown KA , Brown NF , Challis GL , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Crossett B , Davis P , DeShazer D , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hance Z , Hauser H , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Keith KE , Maddison M , Moule S , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Songsivilai S , Stevens K , Tumapa S , Vesaratchavest M , Whitehead S , Yeats C , Barrell BG , Oyston PC , Parkhill J
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14240 , 2004
Abstract : Burkholderia pseudomallei is a recognized biothreat agent and the causative agent of melioidosis. This Gram-negative bacterium exists as a soil saprophyte in melioidosis-endemic areas of the world and accounts for 20% of community-acquired septicaemias in northeastern Thailand where half of those affected die. Here we report the complete genome of B. pseudomallei, which is composed of two chromosomes of 4.07 megabase pairs and 3.17 megabase pairs, showing significant functional partitioning of genes between them. The large chromosome encodes many of the core functions associated with central metabolism and cell growth, whereas the small chromosome carries more accessory functions associated with adaptation and survival in different niches. Genomic comparisons with closely and more distantly related bacteria revealed a greater level of gene order conservation and a greater number of orthologous genes on the large chromosome, suggesting that the two replicons have distinct evolutionary origins. A striking feature of the genome was the presence of 16 genomic islands (GIs) that together made up 6.1% of the genome. Further analysis revealed these islands to be variably present in a collection of invasive and soil isolates but entirely absent from the clonally related organism B. mallei. We propose that variable horizontal gene acquisition by B. pseudomallei is an important feature of recent genetic evolution and that this has resulted in a genetically diverse pathogenic species.
ESTHER : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
PubMedSearch : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
PubMedID: 15377794
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burp1-q3jvq2 , burps-a4lm41 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-q63hx2 , burps-q63i95 , burps-q63im5 , burps-q63is4 , burps-q63ja6 , burps-q63ja9 , burps-q63jh5 , burps-q63l17 , burps-q63l41 , burps-q63l44 , burps-q63lt9 , burps-q63me1 , burps-q63mj7 , burps-q63mj8 , burps-q63mn8 , burps-q63mr2 , burps-q63n52 , burps-q63p18 , burps-q63p99 , burps-q63ug2 , burps-q63ug5 , burps-q63xf9 , burps-q63y36 , burps-q63y45 , burps-q63y52 , burps-q63y59 , burta-q2t474 , burps-hboh

Title : The DNA sequence of chromosome I of an African trypanosome: gene content, chromosome organisation, recombination and polymorphism - Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
Author(s) : Hall N , Berriman M , Lennard NJ , Harris BR , Hertz-Fowler C , Bart-Delabesse EN , Gerrard CS , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bowman S , Bray-Allen SP , Bringaud F , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies R , Doggett J , Fraser A , Gruter E , Hall S , Harper AD , Kay MP , Leech V , Mayes R , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Reitter C , Rutherford K , Sasse J , Sharp S , Shownkeen R , MacLeod A , Taylor S , Tweedie A , Turner CM , Tait A , Gull K , Barrell B , Melville SE
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 31 :4864 , 2003
Abstract : The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, causes sleeping sickness in humans in sub-Saharan Africa. Here we report the sequence and analysis of the 1.1 Mb chromosome I, which encodes approximately 400 predicted genes organised into directional clusters, of which more than 100 are located in the largest cluster of 250 kb. A 160-kb region consists primarily of three gene families of unknown function, one of which contains a hotspot for retroelement insertion. We also identify five novel gene families. Indeed, almost 20% of predicted genes are members of families. In some cases, tandemly arrayed genes are 99-100% identical, suggesting an active process of amplification and gene conversion. One end of the chromosome consists of a putative bloodstream-form variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression site that appears truncated and degenerate. The other chromosome end carries VSG and expression site-associated genes and pseudogenes over 50 kb of subtelomeric sequence where, unusually, the telomere-proximal VSG gene is oriented away from the telomere. Our analysis includes the cataloguing of minor genetic variations between the chromosome I homologues and an estimate of crossing-over frequency during genetic exchange. Genetic polymorphisms are exceptionally rare in sequences located within and around the strand-switches between several gene clusters.
ESTHER : Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
PubMedSearch : Hall_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_4864
PubMedID: 12907729
Gene_locus related to this paper: trybr-CHR1.244 , trybr-CHR1.412 , trybr-Q4GYA0

Title : Complete genome sequence of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) - Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
Author(s) : Bentley SD , Chater KF , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Challis GL , Thomson NR , James KD , Harris DE , Quail MA , Kieser H , Harper D , Bateman A , Brown S , Chandra G , Chen CW , Collins M , Cronin A , Fraser A , Goble A , Hidalgo J , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huang CH , Kieser T , Larke L , Murphy L , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Seeger K , Saunders D , Sharp S , Squares R , Squares S , Taylor K , Warren T , Wietzorrek A , Woodward J , Barrell BG , Parkhill J , Hopwood DA
Ref : Nature , 417 :141 , 2002
Abstract : Streptomyces coelicolor is a representative of the group of soil-dwelling, filamentous bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. Here we report the 8,667,507 base pair linear chromosome of this organism, containing the largest number of genes so far discovered in a bacterium. The 7,825 predicted genes include more than 20 clusters coding for known or predicted secondary metabolites. The genome contains an unprecedented proportion of regulatory genes, predominantly those likely to be involved in responses to external stimuli and stresses, and many duplicated gene sets that may represent 'tissue-specific' isoforms operating in different phases of colonial development, a unique situation for a bacterium. An ancient synteny was revealed between the central 'core' of the chromosome and the whole chromosome of pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The genome sequence will greatly increase our understanding of microbial life in the soil as well as aiding the generation of new drug candidates by genetic engineering.
ESTHER : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedSearch : Bentley_2002_Nature_417_141
PubMedID: 12000953
Gene_locus related to this paper: strco-cxest , strco-cxest2 , strco-ester , strco-estli , strco-MMYT , strco-ORF3 , strco-q9f2m1 , strco-q9rdq9 , strco-q9x8r0 , strco-SC1A6.21 , strco-SC3F7.14 , strco-SC4C2.18 , strco-SC10F4.23 , strco-SCBAC20F6.10 , strco-SCD95A , strco-SCE8.12C , strco-SCE63.01 , strco-SCF43.16C , strco-SCJ9A.33C , strco-SCO0047 , strco-SCO0135 , strco-SCO0490 , strco-SCO0503 , strco-SCO0556.1 , strco-SCO0556.2 , strco-SCO1265 , strco-SCO2123 , strco-SCO2516 , strco-SCO2723 , strco-SCO2761 , strco-SCO3396 , strco-SCO3772 , strco-SCO4160 , strco-SCO4900 , strco-SCO5215 , strco-SCO5986 , strco-SCO6351 , strco-SCO6488 , strco-SCO7057 , strco-SCO7121 , strco-SCO7396 , strco-SCO7609 , strco-SCOT , strco-SLPD , strco-TAP

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20 - Deloukas_2001_Nature_414_865
Author(s) : Deloukas P , Matthews LH , Ashurst J , Burton J , Gilbert JG , Jones M , Stavrides G , Almeida JP , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Bailey J , Barlow KF , Bates KN , Beard LM , Beare DM , Beasley OP , Bird CP , Blakey SE , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Buck D , Burrill W , Butler AP , Carder C , Carter NP , Chapman JC , Clamp M , Clark G , Clark LN , Clark SY , Clee CM , Clegg S , Cobley VE , Collier RE , Connor R , Corby NR , Coulson A , Coville GJ , Deadman R , Dhami P , Dunn M , Ellington AG , Frankland JA , Fraser A , French L , Garner P , Grafham DV , Griffiths C , Griffiths MN , Gwilliam R , Hall RE , Hammond S , Harley JL , Heath PD , Ho S , Holden JL , Howden PJ , Huckle E , Hunt AR , Hunt SE , Jekosch K , Johnson CM , Johnson D , Kay MP , Kimberley AM , King A , Knights A , Laird GK , Lawlor S , Lehvaslaiho MH , Leversha M , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Lovell JD , Marsh VL , Martin SL , McConnachie LJ , McLay K , McMurray AA , Milne S , Mistry D , Moore MJ , Mullikin JC , Nickerson T , Oliver K , Parker A , Patel R , Pearce TA , Peck AI , Phillimore BJ , Prathalingam SR , Plumb RW , Ramsay H , Rice CM , Ross MT , Scott CE , Sehra HK , Shownkeen R , Sims S , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Soderlund C , Steward CA , Sulston JE , Swann M , Sycamore N , Taylor R , Tee L , Thomas DW , Thorpe A , Tracey A , Tromans AC , Vaudin M , Wall M , Wallis JM , Whitehead SL , Whittaker P , Willey DL , Williams L , Williams SA , Wilming L , Wray PW , Hubbard T , Durbin RM , Bentley DR , Beck S , Rogers J
Ref : Nature , 414 :865 , 2001
Abstract : The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes.
ESTHER : Deloukas_2001_Nature_414_865
PubMedSearch : Deloukas_2001_Nature_414_865
PubMedID: 11780052
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD12 , human-ABHD16B , human-CTSA , human-NDRG3 , human-RBBP9