Feldblyum T

References (8)

Title : Sequence and annotation of the 369-kb NY-2A and the 345-kb AR158 viruses that infect Chlorella NC64A - Fitzgerald_2007_Virology_358_472
Author(s) : Fitzgerald LA , Graves MV , Li X , Feldblyum T , Nierman WC , Van Etten JL
Ref : Virology , 358 :472 , 2007
Abstract : Viruses NY-2A and AR158, members of the family Phycodnaviridae, genus Chlorovirus, infect the fresh water, unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green alga, Chlorella NC64A. The 368,683-bp genome of NY-2A and the 344,690-bp genome of AR158 are the two largest chlorella virus genomes sequenced to date; NY-2A contains 404 putative protein-encoding and 7 tRNA-encoding genes and AR158 contains 360 putative protein-encoding and 6 tRNA-encoding genes. The protein-encoding genes are almost evenly distributed on both strands, and intergenic space is minimal. Two of the NY-2A genes encode inteins, the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase and a superfamily II helicase. These are the first inteins to be detected in the chlorella viruses. Approximately 40% of the viral gene products resemble entries in the public databases, including some that are unexpected for a virus. These include GDP-d-mannose dehydratase, fucose synthase, aspartate transcarbamylase, Ca(++) transporting ATPase and ubiquitin. Comparison of NY-2A and AR158 protein-encoding genes with the prototype chlorella virus PBCV-1 indicates that 85% of the genes are present in all three viruses.
ESTHER : Fitzgerald_2007_Virology_358_472
PubMedSearch : Fitzgerald_2007_Virology_358_472
PubMedID: 17027058
Gene_locus related to this paper: pbcva-a7rbb8

Title : Draft genome of the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi - Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
Author(s) : Ghedin E , Wang S , Spiro D , Caler E , Zhao Q , Crabtree J , Allen JE , Delcher AL , Guiliano DB , Miranda-Saavedra D , Angiuoli SV , Creasy T , Amedeo P , Haas B , El-Sayed NM , Wortman JR , Feldblyum T , Tallon L , Schatz M , Shumway M , Koo H , Salzberg SL , Schobel S , Pertea M , Pop M , White O , Barton GJ , Carlow CK , Crawford MJ , Daub J , Dimmic MW , Estes CF , Foster JM , Ganatra M , Gregory WF , Johnson NM , Jin J , Komuniecki R , Korf I , Kumar S , Laney S , Li BW , Li W , Lindblom TH , Lustigman S , Ma D , Maina CV , Martin DM , McCarter JP , McReynolds L , Mitreva M , Nutman TB , Parkinson J , Peregrin-Alvarez JM , Poole C , Ren Q , Saunders L , Sluder AE , Smith K , Stanke M , Unnasch TR , Ware J , Wei AD , Weil G , Williams DJ , Zhang Y , Williams SA , Fraser-Liggett C , Slatko B , Blaxter ML , Scott AL
Ref : Science , 317 :1756 , 2007
Abstract : Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the approximately 90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict approximately 11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during approximately 350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.
ESTHER : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedSearch : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedID: 17885136
Gene_locus related to this paper: bruma-a8ndk6 , bruma-a8njt8 , bruma-a8nl88 , bruma-a8npi4 , bruma-a8npi6 , bruma-a8p6g9 , bruma-a8pah3 , bruma-a8pc38 , bruma-a8pek5 , bruma-a8piq4 , bruma-a8pnw8 , bruma-a8psu4 , bruma-a8pte1 , bruma-a8q606 , bruma-a8q632 , bruma-a8q937 , bruma-a8qav5 , bruma-a8qbd9 , bruma-a8qgj6 , bruma-a8qh78 , bruma-a8q143 , bruma-a0a024mej5 , bruma-a0a0k0jju9 , bruma-a0a0i9n517

Title : Whole-genome sequence analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveals divergence among pathovars in genes involved in virulence and transposition - Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
Author(s) : Joardar V , Lindeberg M , Jackson RW , Selengut J , Dodson R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Deboy R , Durkin AS , Giglio MG , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Rosovitz MJ , Sullivan S , Crabtree J , Creasy T , Davidsen T , Haft DH , Zafar N , Zhou L , Halpin R , Holley T , Khouri H , Feldblyum T , White O , Fraser CM , Chatterjee AK , Cartinhour S , Schneider DJ , Mansfield J , Collmer A , Buell CR
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 187 :6488 , 2005
Abstract : Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, a gram-negative bacterial plant pathogen, is the causal agent of halo blight of bean. In this study, we report on the genome sequence of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola isolate 1448A, which encodes 5,353 open reading frames (ORFs) on one circular chromosome (5,928,787 bp) and two plasmids (131,950 bp and 51,711 bp). Comparative analyses with a phylogenetically divergent pathovar, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, revealed a strong degree of conservation at the gene and genome levels. In total, 4,133 ORFs were identified as putative orthologs in these two pathovars using a reciprocal best-hit method, with 3,941 ORFs present in conserved, syntenic blocks. Although these two pathovars are highly similar at the physiological level, they have distinct host ranges; 1448A causes disease in beans, and DC3000 is pathogenic on tomato and Arabidopsis. Examination of the complement of ORFs encoding virulence, fitness, and survival factors revealed a substantial, but not complete, overlap between these two pathovars. Another distinguishing feature between the two pathovars is their distinctive sets of transposable elements. With access to a fifth complete pseudomonad genome sequence, we were able to identify 3,567 ORFs that likely comprise the core Pseudomonas genome and 365 ORFs that are P. syringae specific.
ESTHER : Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
PubMedSearch : Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
PubMedID: 16159782
Gene_locus related to this paper: pse14-q48cb3 , pse14-q48ck7 , pse14-q48cs3 , pse14-q48ct2 , pse14-q48d82 , pse14-q48da3 , pse14-q48dj9 , pse14-q48dq5 , pse14-q48e33 , pse14-q48es1 , pse14-q48f84 , pse14-q48fg2 , pse14-q48g47 , pse14-q48g51 , pse14-q48gq9 , pse14-q48h40 , pse14-q48ha4 , pse14-q48hb4 , pse14-q48he1 , pse14-q48hq0 , pse14-q48hq2 , pse14-q48ia0 , pse14-q48im0 , pse14-q48j48 , pse14-q48ji2 , pse14-q48k54 , pse14-q48k55 , pse14-q48k63 , pse14-q48kc1 , pse14-q48kt9 , pse14-q48ku0 , pse14-q48lb6 , pse14-q48lj1 , pse14-q48ln2 , pse14-q48m56 , pse14-q48mh5 , pse14-q48mq7 , pse14-q48nt0 , pse14-q48p24 , pse14-q48pi7 , pse14-q48pi8 , pse14-q48pi9 , pse14-q48pq2 , pse14-q48pq5 , psesm-METX , psesm-q87y20 , psesm-q889k3 , psesy-PIP , psesy-PSPTO0162 , psesy-PSPTO1766 , psesy-PSPTO2134 , psesy-PSPTO3135 , pseu2-q4zwv7 , psesg-e7p3i0

Title : The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease - El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
Author(s) : El-Sayed NM , Myler PJ , Bartholomeu DC , Nilsson D , Aggarwal G , Tran AN , Ghedin E , Worthey EA , Delcher AL , Blandin G , Westenberger SJ , Caler E , Cerqueira GC , Branche C , Haas B , Anupama A , Arner E , Aslund L , Attipoe P , Bontempi E , Bringaud F , Burton P , Cadag E , Campbell DA , Carrington M , Crabtree J , Darban H , da Silveira JF , de Jong P , Edwards K , Englund PT , Fazelina G , Feldblyum T , Ferella M , Frasch AC , Gull K , Horn D , Hou L , Huang Y , Kindlund E , Klingbeil M , Kluge S , Koo H , Lacerda D , Levin MJ , Lorenzi H , Louie T , Machado CR , McCulloch R , McKenna A , Mizuno Y , Mottram JC , Nelson S , Ochaya S , Osoegawa K , Pai G , Parsons M , Pentony M , Pettersson U , Pop M , Ramirez JL , Rinta J , Robertson L , Salzberg SL , Sanchez DO , Seyler A , Sharma R , Shetty J , Simpson AJ , Sisk E , Tammi MT , Tarleton R , Teixeira S , Van Aken S , Vogt C , Ward PN , Wickstead B , Wortman J , White O , Fraser CM , Stuart KD , Andersson B
Ref : Science , 309 :409 , 2005
Abstract : Whole-genome sequencing of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi revealed that the diploid genome contains a predicted 22,570 proteins encoded by genes, of which 12,570 represent allelic pairs. Over 50% of the genome consists of repeated sequences, such as retrotransposons and genes for large families of surface molecules, which include trans-sialidases, mucins, gp63s, and a large novel family (>1300 copies) of mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) genes. Analyses of the T. cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania major (Tritryp) genomes imply differences from other eukaryotes in DNA repair and initiation of replication and reflect their unusual mitochondrial DNA. Although the Tritryp lack several classes of signaling molecules, their kinomes contain a large and diverse set of protein kinases and phosphatases; their size and diversity imply previously unknown interactions and regulatory processes, which may be targets for intervention.
ESTHER : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedSearch : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedID: 16020725
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4cqq5 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc3 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4czy3 , trycr-q4d1s2 , trycr-q4d2n1 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dab1 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dap7 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dp03 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dry8 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvl8 , trycr-q4dvp1 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2 , trycr-q6y3z8 , trycr-Q94795 , trycr-TCPO

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : Sequence, annotation, and analysis of synteny between rice chromosome 3 and diverged grass species - Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
Author(s) : Buell CR , Yuan Q , Ouyang S , Liu J , Zhu W , Wang A , Maiti R , Haas B , Wortman J , Pertea M , Jones KM , Kim M , Overton L , Tsitrin T , Fadrosh D , Bera J , Weaver B , Jin S , Johri S , Reardon M , Webb K , Hill J , Moffat K , Tallon L , Van Aken S , Lewis M , Utterback T , Feldblyum T , Zismann V , Iobst S , Hsiao J , de Vazeille AR , Salzberg SL , White O , Fraser C , Yu Y , Kim H , Rambo T , Currie J , Collura K , Kernodle-Thompson S , Wei F , Kudrna K , Ammiraju JS , Luo M , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Henry D , Oates R , Palmer M , Pries G , Saski C , Simmons J , Soderlund C , Nelson W , de la Bastide M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Huang E , Preston R , Zutavern T , Palmer LE , O'Shaughnessy A , Dike S , McCombie WR , Minx P , Cordum H , Wilson R , Jin W , Lee HR , Jiang J , Jackson S
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1284 , 2005
Abstract : Rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 3 is evolutionarily conserved across the cultivated cereals and shares large blocks of synteny with maize and sorghum, which diverged from rice more than 50 million years ago. To begin to completely understand this chromosome, we sequenced, finished, and annotated 36.1 Mb ( approximately 97%) from O. sativa subsp. japonica cv Nipponbare. Annotation features of the chromosome include 5915 genes, of which 913 are related to transposable elements. A putative function could be assigned to 3064 genes, with another 757 genes annotated as expressed, leaving 2094 that encode hypothetical proteins. Similarity searches against the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed putative homologs for 67% of the chromosome 3 proteins. Further searches of a nonredundant amino acid database, the Pfam domain database, plant Expressed Sequence Tags, and genomic assemblies from sorghum and maize revealed only 853 nontransposable element related proteins from chromosome 3 that lacked similarity to other known sequences. Interestingly, 426 of these have a paralog within the rice genome. A comparative physical map of the wild progenitor species, Oryza nivara, with japonica chromosome 3 revealed a high degree of sequence identity and synteny between these two species, which diverged approximately 10,000 years ago. Although no major rearrangements were detected, the deduced size of the O. nivara chromosome 3 was 21% smaller than that of japonica. Synteny between rice and other cereals using an integrated maize physical map and wheat genetic map was strikingly high, further supporting the use of rice and, in particular, chromosome 3, as a model for comparative studies among the cereals.
ESTHER : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedSearch : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedID: 16109971
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysj-cgep , orysj-q0dud7 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2

Title : Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome - Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
Author(s) : Nierman WC , DeShazer D , Kim HS , Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Feldblyum T , Ulrich RL , Ronning CM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TD , DeBoy RT , Dimitrov G , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Khouri H , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Mohammoud Y , Nelson WC , Radune D , Romero CM , Sarria S , Selengut J , Shamblin C , Sullivan SA , White O , Yu Y , Zafar N , Zhou L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14246 , 2004
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression profiling of the bacterium in hamster liver in vivo. The genome contains numerous insertion sequence elements that have mediated extensive deletions and rearrangements of the genome relative to Burkholderia pseudomallei. The genome also contains a vast number (>12,000) of simple sequence repeats. Variation in simple sequence repeats in key genes can provide a mechanism for generating antigenic variation that may account for the mammalian host's inability to mount a durable adaptive immune response to a B. mallei infection.
ESTHER : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedID: 15377793
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-hboh

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 2, 10, 11 and 14 - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Shallom SJ , Carlton JM , Salzberg SL , Nene V , Shoaibi A , Ciecko A , Lynn J , Rizzo M , Weaver B , Jarrahi B , Brenner M , Parvizi B , Tallon L , Moazzez A , Granger D , Fujii C , Hansen C , Pederson J , Feldblyum T , Peterson J , Suh B , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , White O , Cummings LM , Smith HO , Adams MD , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 419 :531 , 2002
Abstract : The mosquito-borne malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum kills an estimated 0.7-2.7 million people every year, primarily children in sub-Saharan Africa. Without effective interventions, a variety of factors-including the spread of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs and the increasing insecticide resistance of mosquitoes-may cause the number of malaria cases to double over the next two decades. To stimulate basic research and facilitate the development of new drugs and vaccines, the genome of Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 has been sequenced using a chromosome-by-chromosome shotgun strategy. We report here the nucleotide sequences of chromosomes 10, 11 and 14, and a re-analysis of the chromosome 2 sequence. These chromosomes represent about 35% of the 23-megabase P. falciparum genome.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedID: 12368868
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-MAL3P8.11