White O

References (46)

Title : The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni - Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
Author(s) : Berriman M , Haas BJ , LoVerde PT , Wilson RA , Dillon GP , Cerqueira GC , Mashiyama ST , Al-Lazikani B , Andrade LF , Ashton PD , Aslett MA , Bartholomeu DC , Blandin G , Caffrey CR , Coghlan A , Coulson R , Day TA , Delcher A , DeMarco R , Djikeng A , Eyre T , Gamble JA , Ghedin E , Gu Y , Hertz-Fowler C , Hirai H , Hirai Y , Houston R , Ivens A , Johnston DA , Lacerda D , Macedo CD , McVeigh P , Ning Z , Oliveira G , Overington JP , Parkhill J , Pertea M , Pierce RJ , Protasio AV , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rogers J , Sajid M , Salzberg SL , Stanke M , Tivey AR , White O , Williams DL , Wortman J , Wu W , Zamanian M , Zerlotini A , Fraser-Liggett CM , Barrell BG , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Nature , 460 :352 , 2009
Abstract : Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. Here we present analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and new families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternative splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the Lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, and the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and new targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints, and a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease.
ESTHER : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2009_Nature_460_352
PubMedID: 19606141
Gene_locus related to this paper: schma-ACHE1 , schma-ACHE2 , schma-c4qb79 , schma-c4qmk4 , schma-g4v9h7 , schma-BCHE , schma-g4vmf3

Title : Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax - Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Adams JH , Silva JC , Bidwell SL , Lorenzi H , Caler E , Crabtree J , Angiuoli SV , Merino EF , Amedeo P , Cheng Q , Coulson RM , Crabb BS , Del Portillo HA , Essien K , Feldblyum TV , Fernandez-Becerra C , Gilson PR , Gueye AH , Guo X , Kang'a S , Kooij TW , Korsinczky M , Meyer EV , Nene V , Paulsen I , White O , Ralph SA , Ren Q , Sargeant TJ , Salzberg SL , Stoeckert CJ , Sullivan SA , Yamamoto MM , Hoffman SL , Wortman JR , Gardner MJ , Galinski MR , Barnwell JW , Fraser-Liggett CM
Ref : Nature , 455 :757 , 2008
Abstract : The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the approximately 515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often causes relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated continuously in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We sequenced the genome of P. vivax to shed light on its distinctive biological features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternative invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance investigation into this neglected species.
ESTHER : Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2008_Nature_455_757
PubMedID: 18843361
Gene_locus related to this paper: plakh-b3lb44 , plavi-a5kcq0 , plavs-a5k2k6 , plavs-a5k3z4 , plavs-a5k4s6 , plavs-a5k5e4 , plavs-a5k7t5 , plavs-a5k686 , plavs-a5kaa1 , plavs-a5kaa3 , plavs-a5kas6 , plavs-a5kcm2

Title : Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis - Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
Author(s) : Carlton JM , Hirt RP , Silva JC , Delcher AL , Schatz M , Zhao Q , Wortman JR , Bidwell SL , Alsmark UC , Besteiro S , Sicheritz-Ponten T , Noel CJ , Dacks JB , Foster PG , Simillion C , Van de Peer Y , Miranda-Saavedra D , Barton GJ , Westrop GD , Muller S , Dessi D , Fiori PL , Ren Q , Paulsen I , Zhang H , Bastida-Corcuera FD , Simoes-Barbosa A , Brown MT , Hayes RD , Mukherjee M , Okumura CY , Schneider R , Smith AJ , Vanacova S , Villalvazo M , Haas BJ , Pertea M , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Shu CL , Osoegawa K , de Jong PJ , Hrdy I , Horvathova L , Zubacova Z , Dolezal P , Malik SB , Logsdon JM, Jr. , Henze K , Gupta A , Wang CC , Dunne RL , Upcroft JA , Upcroft P , White O , Salzberg SL , Tang P , Chiu CH , Lee YS , Embley TM , Coombs GH , Mottram JC , Tachezy J , Fraser-Liggett CM , Johnson PJ
Ref : Science , 315 :207 , 2007
Abstract : We describe the genome sequence of the protist Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted human pathogen. Repeats and transposable elements comprise about two-thirds of the approximately 160-megabase genome, reflecting a recent massive expansion of genetic material. This expansion, in conjunction with the shaping of metabolic pathways that likely transpired through lateral gene transfer from bacteria, and amplification of specific gene families implicated in pathogenesis and phagocytosis of host proteins may exemplify adaptations of the parasite during its transition to a urogenital environment. The genome sequence predicts previously unknown functions for the hydrogenosome, which support a common evolutionary origin of this unusual organelle with mitochondria.
ESTHER : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedSearch : Carlton_2007_Science_315_207
PubMedID: 17218520
Gene_locus related to this paper: triva-a2d7i4 , triva-a2d9w5 , triva-a2d766 , triva-a2dah5 , triva-a2dlx9 , triva-a2dul1 , triva-a2dy49 , triva-a2e6h5 , triva-a2e7p9 , triva-a2e9l3 , triva-a2e414 , triva-a2e613 , triva-a2e983 , triva-a2eau8 , triva-a2ekb9 , triva-a2en58 , triva-a2erp5 , triva-a2et59 , triva-a2f7u4 , triva-a2f801 , triva-a2fa76 , triva-a2fbq3 , triva-a2fe47 , triva-a2fgl0 , triva-a2fhp7 , triva-a2fie6 , triva-a2fk22 , triva-a2fla2 , triva-a2fqm0 , triva-a2fqq2 , triva-a2frq0 , triva-a2frr3 , triva-a2fsq9 , triva-a2fsz5 , triva-a2fux4 , triva-a2fz57 , triva-a2g2h0 , triva-a2g9x0 , triva-a2fqi4

Title : Genome sequence of Babesia bovis and comparative analysis of apicomplexan hemoprotozoa - Brayton_2007_PLoS.Pathog_3_1401
Author(s) : Brayton KA , Lau AO , Herndon DR , Hannick L , Kappmeyer LS , Berens SJ , Bidwell SL , Brown WC , Crabtree J , Fadrosh D , Feldblum T , Forberger HA , Haas BJ , Howell JM , Khouri H , Koo H , Mann DJ , Norimine J , Paulsen IT , Radune D , Ren Q , Smith RK, Jr. , Suarez CE , White O , Wortman JR , Knowles DP, Jr. , McElwain TF , Nene VM
Ref : PLoS Pathog , 3 :1401 , 2007
Abstract : Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan tick-transmitted pathogen of cattle imposing a global risk and severe constraints to livestock health and economic development. The complete genome sequence was undertaken to facilitate vaccine antigen discovery, and to allow for comparative analysis with the related apicomplexan hemoprotozoa Theileria parva and Plasmodium falciparum. At 8.2 Mbp, the B. bovis genome is similar in size to that of Theileria spp. Structural features of the B. bovis and T. parva genomes are remarkably similar, and extensive synteny is present despite several chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, B. bovis and P. falciparum, which have similar clinical and pathological features, have major differences in genome size, chromosome number, and gene complement. Chromosomal synteny with P. falciparum is limited to microregions. The B. bovis genome sequence has allowed wide scale analyses of the polymorphic variant erythrocyte surface antigen protein (ves1 gene) family that, similar to the P. falciparum var genes, is postulated to play a role in cytoadhesion, sequestration, and immune evasion. The approximately 150 ves1 genes are found in clusters that are distributed throughout each chromosome, with an increased concentration adjacent to a physical gap on chromosome 1 that contains multiple ves1-like sequences. ves1 clusters are frequently linked to a novel family of variant genes termed smorfs that may themselves contribute to immune evasion, may play a role in variant erythrocyte surface antigen protein biology, or both. Initial expression analysis of ves1 and smorf genes indicates coincident transcription of multiple variants. B. bovis displays a limited metabolic potential, with numerous missing pathways, including two pathways previously described for the P. falciparum apicoplast. This reduced metabolic potential is reflected in the B. bovis apicoplast, which appears to have fewer nuclear genes targeted to it than other apicoplast containing organisms. Finally, comparative analyses have identified several novel vaccine candidates including a positional homolog of p67 and SPAG-1, Theileria sporozoite antigens targeted for vaccine development. The genome sequence provides a greater understanding of B. bovis metabolism and potential avenues for drug therapies and vaccine development.
ESTHER : Brayton_2007_PLoS.Pathog_3_1401
PubMedSearch : Brayton_2007_PLoS.Pathog_3_1401
PubMedID: 17953480
Gene_locus related to this paper: babbo-a7amu4 , babbo-a7as90 , babbo-a7au28 , babbo-a7avh4

Title : Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector - Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
Author(s) : Nene V , Wortman JR , Lawson D , Haas B , Kodira C , Tu ZJ , Loftus B , Xi Z , Megy K , Grabherr M , Ren Q , Zdobnov EM , Lobo NF , Campbell KS , Brown SE , Bonaldo MF , Zhu J , Sinkins SP , Hogenkamp DG , Amedeo P , Arensburger P , Atkinson PW , Bidwell S , Biedler J , Birney E , Bruggner RV , Costas J , Coy MR , Crabtree J , Crawford M , Debruyn B , Decaprio D , Eiglmeier K , Eisenstadt E , El-Dorry H , Gelbart WM , Gomes SL , Hammond M , Hannick LI , Hogan JR , Holmes MH , Jaffe D , Johnston JS , Kennedy RC , Koo H , Kravitz S , Kriventseva EV , Kulp D , LaButti K , Lee E , Li S , Lovin DD , Mao C , Mauceli E , Menck CF , Miller JR , Montgomery P , Mori A , Nascimento AL , Naveira HF , Nusbaum C , O'Leary S , Orvis J , Pertea M , Quesneville H , Reidenbach KR , Rogers YH , Roth CW , Schneider JR , Schatz M , Shumway M , Stanke M , Stinson EO , Tubio JM , Vanzee JP , Verjovski-Almeida S , Werner D , White O , Wyder S , Zeng Q , Zhao Q , Zhao Y , Hill CA , Raikhel AS , Soares MB , Knudson DL , Lee NH , Galagan J , Salzberg SL , Paulsen IT , Dimopoulos G , Collins FH , Birren B , Fraser-Liggett CM , Severson DW
Ref : Science , 316 :1718 , 2007
Abstract : We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at approximately 1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of approximately 4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of approximately 2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.
ESTHER : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedSearch : Nene_2007_Science_316_1718
PubMedID: 17510324
Gene_locus related to this paper: aedae-ACHE , aedae-ACHE1 , aedae-glita , aedae-q0iea6 , aedae-q0iev6 , aedae-q0ifn6 , aedae-q0ifn8 , aedae-q0ifn9 , aedae-q0ifp0 , aedae-q0ig41 , aedae-q1dgl0 , aedae-q1dh03 , aedae-q1dh19 , aedae-q1hqe6 , aedae-Q8ITU8 , aedae-Q8MMJ6 , aedae-Q8T9V6 , aedae-q16e91 , aedae-q16f04 , aedae-q16f25 , aedae-q16f26 , aedae-q16f28 , aedae-q16f29 , aedae-q16f30 , aedae-q16gq5 , aedae-q16iq5 , aedae-q16je0 , aedae-q16je1 , aedae-q16je2 , aedae-q16ks8 , aedae-q16lf2 , aedae-q16lv6 , aedae-q16m61 , aedae-q16mc1 , aedae-q16mc6 , aedae-q16mc7 , aedae-q16md1 , aedae-q16ms7 , aedae-q16nk5 , aedae-q16rl5 , aedae-q16rz9 , aedae-q16si8 , aedae-q16t49 , aedae-q16wf1 , aedae-q16x18 , aedae-q16xp8 , aedae-q16xu6 , aedae-q16xw5 , aedae-q16xw6 , aedae-q16y04 , aedae-q16y05 , aedae-q16y06 , aedae-q16y07 , aedae-q16y39 , aedae-q16y40 , aedae-q16yg4 , aedae-q16z03 , aedae-q17aa7 , aedae-q17av1 , aedae-q17av2 , aedae-q17av3 , aedae-q17av4 , aedae-q17b28 , aedae-q17b29 , aedae-q17b30 , aedae-q17b31 , aedae-q17b32 , aedae-q17bm3 , aedae-q17bm4 , aedae-q17bv7 , aedae-q17c44 , aedae-q17cz1 , aedae-q17d32 , aedae-q17g39 , aedae-q17g40 , aedae-q17g41 , aedae-q17g42 , aedae-q17g43 , aedae-q17g44 , aedae-q17gb8 , aedae-q17gr3 , aedae-q17if7 , aedae-q17if9 , aedae-q17ig1 , aedae-q17ig2 , aedae-q17is4 , aedae-q17l09 , aedae-q17m26 , aedae-q17mg9 , aedae-q17mv4 , aedae-q17mv5 , aedae-q17mv6 , aedae-q17mv7 , aedae-q17mw8 , aedae-q17mw9 , aedae-q17nw5 , aedae-q17nx5 , aedae-q17pa4 , aedae-q17q69 , aedae-q170k7 , aedae-q171y4 , aedae-q172e0 , aedae-q176i8 , aedae-q176j0 , aedae-q177k1 , aedae-q177k2 , aedae-q177l9 , aedae-j9hic3 , aedae-q179r9 , aedae-u483 , aedae-j9hj23 , aedae-q17d68 , aedae-q177c7 , aedae-q0ifp1 , aedae-a0a1s4fx83 , aedae-a0a1s4g2m0 , aedae-q1hr49

Title : Draft genome of the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi - Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
Author(s) : Ghedin E , Wang S , Spiro D , Caler E , Zhao Q , Crabtree J , Allen JE , Delcher AL , Guiliano DB , Miranda-Saavedra D , Angiuoli SV , Creasy T , Amedeo P , Haas B , El-Sayed NM , Wortman JR , Feldblyum T , Tallon L , Schatz M , Shumway M , Koo H , Salzberg SL , Schobel S , Pertea M , Pop M , White O , Barton GJ , Carlow CK , Crawford MJ , Daub J , Dimmic MW , Estes CF , Foster JM , Ganatra M , Gregory WF , Johnson NM , Jin J , Komuniecki R , Korf I , Kumar S , Laney S , Li BW , Li W , Lindblom TH , Lustigman S , Ma D , Maina CV , Martin DM , McCarter JP , McReynolds L , Mitreva M , Nutman TB , Parkinson J , Peregrin-Alvarez JM , Poole C , Ren Q , Saunders L , Sluder AE , Smith K , Stanke M , Unnasch TR , Ware J , Wei AD , Weil G , Williams DJ , Zhang Y , Williams SA , Fraser-Liggett C , Slatko B , Blaxter ML , Scott AL
Ref : Science , 317 :1756 , 2007
Abstract : Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the approximately 90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict approximately 11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during approximately 350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.
ESTHER : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedSearch : Ghedin_2007_Science_317_1756
PubMedID: 17885136
Gene_locus related to this paper: bruma-a8ndk6 , bruma-a8njt8 , bruma-a8nl88 , bruma-a8npi4 , bruma-a8npi6 , bruma-a8p6g9 , bruma-a8pah3 , bruma-a8pc38 , bruma-a8pek5 , bruma-a8piq4 , bruma-a8pnw8 , bruma-a8psu4 , bruma-a8pte1 , bruma-a8q606 , bruma-a8q632 , bruma-a8q937 , bruma-a8qav5 , bruma-a8qbd9 , bruma-a8qgj6 , bruma-a8qh78 , bruma-a8q143 , bruma-a0a024mej5 , bruma-a0a0k0jju9 , bruma-a0a0i9n517

Title : Comparative genomics of emerging human ehrlichiosis agents - Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
Author(s) : Dunning Hotopp JC , Lin M , Madupu R , Crabtree J , Angiuoli SV , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ren Q , Wu M , Utterback TR , Smith S , Lewis M , Khouri H , Zhang C , Niu H , Lin Q , Ohashi N , Zhi N , Nelson W , Brinkac LM , Dodson RJ , Rosovitz MJ , Sundaram J , Daugherty SC , Davidsen T , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Haft DH , Selengut JD , Sullivan SA , Zafar N , Zhou L , Benahmed F , Forberger H , Halpin R , Mulligan S , Robinson J , White O , Rikihisa Y , Tettelin H
Ref : PLoS Genet , 2 :e21 , 2006
Abstract : Anaplasma (formerly Ehrlichia) phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Neorickettsia (formerly Ehrlichia) sennetsu are intracellular vector-borne pathogens that cause human ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. We present the complete genome sequences of these organisms along with comparisons to other organisms in the Rickettsiales order. Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. display a unique large expansion of immunodominant outer membrane proteins facilitating antigenic variation. All Rickettsiales have a diminished ability to synthesize amino acids compared to their closest free-living relatives. Unlike members of the Rickettsiaceae family, these pathogenic Anaplasmataceae are capable of making all major vitamins, cofactors, and nucleotides, which could confer a beneficial role in the invertebrate vector or the vertebrate host. Further analysis identified proteins potentially involved in vacuole confinement of the Anaplasmataceae, a life cycle involving a hematophagous vector, vertebrate pathogenesis, human pathogenesis, and lack of transovarial transmission. These discoveries provide significant insights into the biology of these obligate intracellular pathogens.
ESTHER : Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
PubMedSearch : Dunning Hotopp_2006_PLoS.Genet_2_e21
PubMedID: 16482227
Gene_locus related to this paper: anapz-q2gj80 , anapz-q2gle9 , anapz-q2glf0 , anapz-q2gln7 , ehrch-q40iu0 , ehrch-q40jj7 , ehrcr-q2gfq9 , neosm-q2gcq8 , neosm-q2gdf2 , neosm-q2gcn8 , anapz-q2gk48 , ehrcr-q2ggj6

Title : Whole-genome sequence analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveals divergence among pathovars in genes involved in virulence and transposition - Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
Author(s) : Joardar V , Lindeberg M , Jackson RW , Selengut J , Dodson R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Deboy R , Durkin AS , Giglio MG , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Rosovitz MJ , Sullivan S , Crabtree J , Creasy T , Davidsen T , Haft DH , Zafar N , Zhou L , Halpin R , Holley T , Khouri H , Feldblyum T , White O , Fraser CM , Chatterjee AK , Cartinhour S , Schneider DJ , Mansfield J , Collmer A , Buell CR
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 187 :6488 , 2005
Abstract : Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, a gram-negative bacterial plant pathogen, is the causal agent of halo blight of bean. In this study, we report on the genome sequence of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola isolate 1448A, which encodes 5,353 open reading frames (ORFs) on one circular chromosome (5,928,787 bp) and two plasmids (131,950 bp and 51,711 bp). Comparative analyses with a phylogenetically divergent pathovar, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, revealed a strong degree of conservation at the gene and genome levels. In total, 4,133 ORFs were identified as putative orthologs in these two pathovars using a reciprocal best-hit method, with 3,941 ORFs present in conserved, syntenic blocks. Although these two pathovars are highly similar at the physiological level, they have distinct host ranges; 1448A causes disease in beans, and DC3000 is pathogenic on tomato and Arabidopsis. Examination of the complement of ORFs encoding virulence, fitness, and survival factors revealed a substantial, but not complete, overlap between these two pathovars. Another distinguishing feature between the two pathovars is their distinctive sets of transposable elements. With access to a fifth complete pseudomonad genome sequence, we were able to identify 3,567 ORFs that likely comprise the core Pseudomonas genome and 365 ORFs that are P. syringae specific.
ESTHER : Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
PubMedSearch : Joardar_2005_J.Bacteriol_187_6488
PubMedID: 16159782
Gene_locus related to this paper: pse14-q48cb3 , pse14-q48ck7 , pse14-q48cs3 , pse14-q48ct2 , pse14-q48d82 , pse14-q48da3 , pse14-q48dj9 , pse14-q48dq5 , pse14-q48e33 , pse14-q48es1 , pse14-q48f84 , pse14-q48fg2 , pse14-q48g47 , pse14-q48g51 , pse14-q48gq9 , pse14-q48h40 , pse14-q48ha4 , pse14-q48hb4 , pse14-q48he1 , pse14-q48hq0 , pse14-q48hq2 , pse14-q48ia0 , pse14-q48im0 , pse14-q48j48 , pse14-q48ji2 , pse14-q48k54 , pse14-q48k55 , pse14-q48k63 , pse14-q48kc1 , pse14-q48kt9 , pse14-q48ku0 , pse14-q48lb6 , pse14-q48lj1 , pse14-q48ln2 , pse14-q48m56 , pse14-q48mh5 , pse14-q48mq7 , pse14-q48nt0 , pse14-q48p24 , pse14-q48pi7 , pse14-q48pi8 , pse14-q48pi9 , pse14-q48pq2 , pse14-q48pq5 , psesm-METX , psesm-q87y20 , psesm-q889k3 , psesy-PIP , psesy-PSPTO0162 , psesy-PSPTO1766 , psesy-PSPTO2134 , psesy-PSPTO3135 , pseu2-q4zwv7 , psesg-e7p3i0

Title : The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease - El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
Author(s) : El-Sayed NM , Myler PJ , Bartholomeu DC , Nilsson D , Aggarwal G , Tran AN , Ghedin E , Worthey EA , Delcher AL , Blandin G , Westenberger SJ , Caler E , Cerqueira GC , Branche C , Haas B , Anupama A , Arner E , Aslund L , Attipoe P , Bontempi E , Bringaud F , Burton P , Cadag E , Campbell DA , Carrington M , Crabtree J , Darban H , da Silveira JF , de Jong P , Edwards K , Englund PT , Fazelina G , Feldblyum T , Ferella M , Frasch AC , Gull K , Horn D , Hou L , Huang Y , Kindlund E , Klingbeil M , Kluge S , Koo H , Lacerda D , Levin MJ , Lorenzi H , Louie T , Machado CR , McCulloch R , McKenna A , Mizuno Y , Mottram JC , Nelson S , Ochaya S , Osoegawa K , Pai G , Parsons M , Pentony M , Pettersson U , Pop M , Ramirez JL , Rinta J , Robertson L , Salzberg SL , Sanchez DO , Seyler A , Sharma R , Shetty J , Simpson AJ , Sisk E , Tammi MT , Tarleton R , Teixeira S , Van Aken S , Vogt C , Ward PN , Wickstead B , Wortman J , White O , Fraser CM , Stuart KD , Andersson B
Ref : Science , 309 :409 , 2005
Abstract : Whole-genome sequencing of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi revealed that the diploid genome contains a predicted 22,570 proteins encoded by genes, of which 12,570 represent allelic pairs. Over 50% of the genome consists of repeated sequences, such as retrotransposons and genes for large families of surface molecules, which include trans-sialidases, mucins, gp63s, and a large novel family (>1300 copies) of mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) genes. Analyses of the T. cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania major (Tritryp) genomes imply differences from other eukaryotes in DNA repair and initiation of replication and reflect their unusual mitochondrial DNA. Although the Tritryp lack several classes of signaling molecules, their kinomes contain a large and diverse set of protein kinases and phosphatases; their size and diversity imply previously unknown interactions and regulatory processes, which may be targets for intervention.
ESTHER : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedSearch : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_409
PubMedID: 16020725
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4cqq5 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc3 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4czy3 , trycr-q4d1s2 , trycr-q4d2n1 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dab1 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dap7 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dp03 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dry8 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvl8 , trycr-q4dvp1 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2 , trycr-q6y3z8 , trycr-Q94795 , trycr-TCPO

Title : The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei - Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
Author(s) : Berriman M , Ghedin E , Hertz-Fowler C , Blandin G , Renauld H , Bartholomeu DC , Lennard NJ , Caler E , Hamlin NE , Haas B , Bohme U , Hannick L , Aslett MA , Shallom J , Marcello L , Hou L , Wickstead B , Alsmark UC , Arrowsmith C , Atkin RJ , Barron AJ , Bringaud F , Brooks K , Carrington M , Cherevach I , Chillingworth TJ , Churcher C , Clark LN , Corton CH , Cronin A , Davies RM , Doggett J , Djikeng A , Feldblyum T , Field MC , Fraser A , Goodhead I , Hance Z , Harper D , Harris BR , Hauser H , Hostetler J , Ivens A , Jagels K , Johnson D , Johnson J , Jones K , Kerhornou AX , Koo H , Larke N , Landfear S , Larkin C , Leech V , Line A , Lord A , MacLeod A , Mooney PJ , Moule S , Martin DM , Morgan GW , Mungall K , Norbertczak H , Ormond D , Pai G , Peacock CS , Peterson J , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Reitter C , Salzberg SL , Sanders M , Schobel S , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Simpson AJ , Tallon L , Turner CM , Tait A , Tivey AR , Van Aken S , Walker D , Wanless D , Wang S , White B , White O , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Wortman J , Adams MD , Embley TM , Gull K , Ullu E , Barry JD , Fairlamb AH , Opperdoes F , Barrell BG , Donelson JE , Hall N , Fraser CM , Melville SE , El-Sayed NM
Ref : Science , 309 :416 , 2005
Abstract : African trypanosomes cause human sleeping sickness and livestock trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. We present the sequence and analysis of the 11 megabase-sized chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. The 26-megabase genome contains 9068 predicted genes, including approximately 900 pseudogenes and approximately 1700 T. brucei-specific genes. Large subtelomeric arrays contain an archive of 806 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes used by the parasite to evade the mammalian immune system. Most VSG genes are pseudogenes, which may be used to generate expressed mosaic genes by ectopic recombination. Comparisons of the cytoskeleton and endocytic trafficking systems with those of humans and other eukaryotic organisms reveal major differences. A comparison of metabolic pathways encoded by the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi, and Leishmania major reveals the least overall metabolic capability in T. brucei and the greatest in L. major. Horizontal transfer of genes of bacterial origin has contributed to some of the metabolic differences in these parasites, and a number of novel potential drug targets have been identified.
ESTHER : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedSearch : Berriman_2005_Science_309_416
PubMedID: 16020726
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q6h9e3 , tryb2-q6ha27 , tryb2-q38cd5 , tryb2-q38cd6 , tryb2-q38cd7 , tryb2-q38dc1 , tryb2-q38de4 , tryb2-q38ds6 , tryb2-q38dx1 , tryb2-q380z6 , tryb2-q382c1 , tryb2-q382l4 , tryb2-q383a9 , tryb2-q386e3 , tryb2-q387r7 , tryb2-q388n1 , tryb2-q389w3 , trybr-PEPTB , trycr-q4cq28 , trycr-q4cq94 , trycr-q4cq95 , trycr-q4cq96 , trycr-q4csm0 , trycr-q4cwv3 , trycr-q4cx66 , trycr-q4cxr6 , trycr-q4cyc5 , trycr-q4cyf6 , trycr-q4d3a2 , trycr-q4d3x3 , trycr-q4d3y4 , trycr-q4d6h1 , trycr-q4d8h8 , trycr-q4d8h9 , trycr-q4d8i0 , trycr-q4d786 , trycr-q4d975 , trycr-q4da08 , trycr-q4dap6 , trycr-q4dbm2 , trycr-q4dbn1 , trycr-q4ddw7 , trycr-q4de42 , trycr-q4dhn8 , trycr-q4dkk8 , trycr-q4dkk9 , trycr-q4dm56 , trycr-q4dqa6 , trycr-q4dt91 , trycr-q4dvp2 , trycr-q4dw34 , trycr-q4dwm3 , trycr-q4dy49 , trycr-q4dy82 , trycr-q4dzp6 , trycr-q4e3m8 , trycr-q4e4t5 , trycr-q4e5d1 , trycr-q4e5z2

Title : Comparative genomics of trypanosomatid parasitic protozoa - El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
Author(s) : El-Sayed NM , Myler PJ , Blandin G , Berriman M , Crabtree J , Aggarwal G , Caler E , Renauld H , Worthey EA , Hertz-Fowler C , Ghedin E , Peacock C , Bartholomeu DC , Haas BJ , Tran AN , Wortman JR , Alsmark UC , Angiuoli S , Anupama A , Badger J , Bringaud F , Cadag E , Carlton JM , Cerqueira GC , Creasy T , Delcher AL , Djikeng A , Embley TM , Hauser C , Ivens AC , Kummerfeld SK , Pereira-Leal JB , Nilsson D , Peterson J , Salzberg SL , Shallom J , Silva JC , Sundaram J , Westenberger S , White O , Melville SE , Donelson JE , Andersson B , Stuart KD , Hall N
Ref : Science , 309 :404 , 2005
Abstract : A comparison of gene content and genome architecture of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania major, three related pathogens with different life cycles and disease pathology, revealed a conserved core proteome of about 6200 genes in large syntenic polycistronic gene clusters. Many species-specific genes, especially large surface antigen families, occur at nonsyntenic chromosome-internal and subtelomeric regions. Retroelements, structural RNAs, and gene family expansion are often associated with syntenic discontinuities that-along with gene divergence, acquisition and loss, and rearrangement within the syntenic regions-have shaped the genomes of each parasite. Contrary to recent reports, our analyses reveal no evidence that these species are descended from an ancestor that contained a photosynthetic endosymbiont.
ESTHER : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
PubMedSearch : El-Sayed_2005_Science_309_404
PubMedID: 16020724
Gene_locus related to this paper: tryb2-q382c1 , trycr-q4dhv2 , trycr-q4dpt2 , trycr-q4dpy4

Title : Sequence, annotation, and analysis of synteny between rice chromosome 3 and diverged grass species - Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
Author(s) : Buell CR , Yuan Q , Ouyang S , Liu J , Zhu W , Wang A , Maiti R , Haas B , Wortman J , Pertea M , Jones KM , Kim M , Overton L , Tsitrin T , Fadrosh D , Bera J , Weaver B , Jin S , Johri S , Reardon M , Webb K , Hill J , Moffat K , Tallon L , Van Aken S , Lewis M , Utterback T , Feldblyum T , Zismann V , Iobst S , Hsiao J , de Vazeille AR , Salzberg SL , White O , Fraser C , Yu Y , Kim H , Rambo T , Currie J , Collura K , Kernodle-Thompson S , Wei F , Kudrna K , Ammiraju JS , Luo M , Goicoechea JL , Wing RA , Henry D , Oates R , Palmer M , Pries G , Saski C , Simmons J , Soderlund C , Nelson W , de la Bastide M , Spiegel L , Nascimento L , Huang E , Preston R , Zutavern T , Palmer LE , O'Shaughnessy A , Dike S , McCombie WR , Minx P , Cordum H , Wilson R , Jin W , Lee HR , Jiang J , Jackson S
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1284 , 2005
Abstract : Rice (Oryza sativa L.) chromosome 3 is evolutionarily conserved across the cultivated cereals and shares large blocks of synteny with maize and sorghum, which diverged from rice more than 50 million years ago. To begin to completely understand this chromosome, we sequenced, finished, and annotated 36.1 Mb ( approximately 97%) from O. sativa subsp. japonica cv Nipponbare. Annotation features of the chromosome include 5915 genes, of which 913 are related to transposable elements. A putative function could be assigned to 3064 genes, with another 757 genes annotated as expressed, leaving 2094 that encode hypothetical proteins. Similarity searches against the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed putative homologs for 67% of the chromosome 3 proteins. Further searches of a nonredundant amino acid database, the Pfam domain database, plant Expressed Sequence Tags, and genomic assemblies from sorghum and maize revealed only 853 nontransposable element related proteins from chromosome 3 that lacked similarity to other known sequences. Interestingly, 426 of these have a paralog within the rice genome. A comparative physical map of the wild progenitor species, Oryza nivara, with japonica chromosome 3 revealed a high degree of sequence identity and synteny between these two species, which diverged approximately 10,000 years ago. Although no major rearrangements were detected, the deduced size of the O. nivara chromosome 3 was 21% smaller than that of japonica. Synteny between rice and other cereals using an integrated maize physical map and wheat genetic map was strikingly high, further supporting the use of rice and, in particular, chromosome 3, as a model for comparative studies among the cereals.
ESTHER : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedSearch : Buell_2005_Genome.Res_15_1284
PubMedID: 16109971
Gene_locus related to this paper: orysa-Q852M6 , orysa-Q8S5X5 , orysa-Q84QZ6 , orysa-Q84QY7 , orysa-Q851E3 , orysa-q6ave2 , orysj-cgep , orysj-q0dud7 , orysj-q10j20 , orysj-q10ss2

Title : Genomic sequence of the pathogenic and allergenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus - Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Pain A , Anderson MJ , Wortman JR , Kim HS , Arroyo J , Berriman M , Abe K , Archer DB , Bermejo C , Bennett J , Bowyer P , Chen D , Collins M , Coulsen R , Davies R , Dyer PS , Farman M , Fedorova N , Feldblyum TV , Fischer R , Fosker N , Fraser A , Garcia JL , Garcia MJ , Goble A , Goldman GH , Gomi K , Griffith-Jones S , Gwilliam R , Haas B , Haas H , Harris D , Horiuchi H , Huang J , Humphray S , Jimenez J , Keller N , Khouri H , Kitamoto K , Kobayashi T , Konzack S , Kulkarni R , Kumagai T , Lafon A , Latge JP , Li W , Lord A , Lu C , Majoros WH , May GS , Miller BL , Mohamoud Y , Molina M , Monod M , Mouyna I , Mulligan S , Murphy L , O'Neil S , Paulsen I , Penalva MA , Pertea M , Price C , Pritchard BL , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rawlins N , Rajandream MA , Reichard U , Renauld H , Robson GD , Rodriguez de Cordoba S , Rodriguez-Pena JM , Ronning CM , Rutter S , Salzberg SL , Sanchez M , Sanchez-Ferrero JC , Saunders D , Seeger K , Squares R , Squares S , Takeuchi M , Tekaia F , Turner G , Vazquez de Aldana CR , Weidman J , White O , Woodward J , Yu JH , Fraser C , Galagan JE , Asai K , Machida M , Hall N , Barrell B , Denning DW
Ref : Nature , 438 :1151 , 2005
Abstract : Aspergillus fumigatus is exceptional among microorganisms in being both a primary and opportunistic pathogen as well as a major allergen. Its conidia production is prolific, and so human respiratory tract exposure is almost constant. A. fumigatus is isolated from human habitats and vegetable compost heaps. In immunocompromised individuals, the incidence of invasive infection can be as high as 50% and the mortality rate is often about 50% (ref. 2). The interaction of A. fumigatus and other airborne fungi with the immune system is increasingly linked to severe asthma and sinusitis. Although the burden of invasive disease caused by A. fumigatus is substantial, the basic biology of the organism is mostly obscure. Here we show the complete 29.4-megabase genome sequence of the clinical isolate Af293, which consists of eight chromosomes containing 9,926 predicted genes. Microarray analysis revealed temperature-dependent expression of distinct sets of genes, as well as 700 A. fumigatus genes not present or significantly diverged in the closely related sexual species Neosartorya fischeri, many of which may have roles in the pathogenicity phenotype. The Af293 genome sequence provides an unparalleled resource for the future understanding of this remarkable fungus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2005_Nature_438_1151
PubMedID: 16372009
Gene_locus related to this paper: aspfc-b0xp50 , aspfc-b0xu40 , aspfc-b0xzj6 , aspfc-dpp5 , aspfu-apth1 , aspfu-axe1 , aspfu-CBPYA , aspfu-faec , aspfu-kex1 , aspfu-ppme1 , aspfu-q4wa39 , aspfu-q4wa78 , aspfu-q4wf56 , aspfu-q4wg73 , aspfu-q4wk44 , aspfu-q4wkh6 , aspfu-q4wnx3 , aspfu-q4wpb9 , aspfu-q4wqv2 , aspfu-q4wub2 , aspfu-q4wxr1 , aspfu-q4x0n6 , aspfu-q4x1n0 , aspfu-q5vjg7 , neofi-a1cwa6 , neofi-a1dfr9 , aspfm-a0a084bf80 , aspfu-fmac

Title : Genome analysis of multiple pathogenic isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae: implications for the microbial pan-genome - Tettelin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_13950
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Masignani V , Cieslewicz MJ , Donati C , Medini D , Ward NL , Angiuoli SV , Crabtree J , Jones AL , Durkin AS , DeBoy RT , Davidsen TM , Mora M , Scarselli M , Margarit y Ros I , Peterson JD , Hauser CR , Sundaram JP , Nelson WC , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Dodson RJ , Rosovitz MJ , Sullivan SA , Daugherty SC , Haft DH , Selengut J , Gwinn ML , Zhou L , Zafar N , Khouri H , Radune D , Dimitrov G , Watkins K , O'Connor KJ , Smith S , Utterback TR , White O , Rubens CE , Grandi G , Madoff LC , Kasper DL , Telford JL , Wessels MR , Rappuoli R , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 102 :13950 , 2005
Abstract : The development of efficient and inexpensive genome sequencing methods has revolutionized the study of human bacterial pathogens and improved vaccine design. Unfortunately, the sequence of a single genome does not reflect how genetic variability drives pathogenesis within a bacterial species and also limits genome-wide screens for vaccine candidates or for antimicrobial targets. We have generated the genomic sequence of six strains representing the five major disease-causing serotypes of Streptococcus agalactiae, the main cause of neonatal infection in humans. Analysis of these genomes and those available in databases showed that the S. agalactiae species can be described by a pan-genome consisting of a core genome shared by all isolates, accounting for approximately 80% of any single genome, plus a dispensable genome consisting of partially shared and strain-specific genes. Mathematical extrapolation of the data suggests that the gene reservoir available for inclusion in the S. agalactiae pan-genome is vast and that unique genes will continue to be identified even after sequencing hundreds of genomes.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_13950
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2005_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_102_13950
PubMedID: 16172379
Gene_locus related to this paper: strag-ESTA , strag-GBS0040 , strag-GBS0107 , strag-GBS1828 , strag-pepx , strag-q3dah6 , strag-SAG0246 , strag-SAG0383 , strag-SAG0679 , strag-SAG0680 , strag-SAG0785 , strag-SAG0912 , strag-SAG1562 , strag-SAG2132

Title : Whole genome comparisons of serotype 4b and 1\/2a strains of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes reveal new insights into the core genome components of this species - Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Fouts DE , Mongodin EF , Ravel J , DeBoy RT , Kolonay JF , Rasko DA , Angiuoli SV , Gill SR , Paulsen IT , Peterson J , White O , Nelson WC , Nierman W , Beanan MJ , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Madupu R , Haft DH , Selengut J , Van Aken S , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Forberger H , Tran B , Kathariou S , Wonderling LD , Uhlich GA , Bayles DO , Luchansky JB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 32 :2386 , 2004
Abstract : The genomes of three strains of Listeria monocytogenes that have been associated with food-borne illness in the USA were subjected to whole genome comparative analysis. A total of 51, 97 and 69 strain-specific genes were identified in L.monocytogenes strains F2365 (serotype 4b, cheese isolate), F6854 (serotype 1/2a, frankfurter isolate) and H7858 (serotype 4b, meat isolate), respectively. Eighty-three genes were restricted to serotype 1/2a and 51 to serotype 4b strains. These strain- and serotype-specific genes probably contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, and the ability of the organisms to survive and grow in their respective environmental niches. The serotype 1/2a-specific genes include an operon that encodes the rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that is associated with teichoic acid biosynthesis, as well as operons for five glycosyl transferases and an adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase. A total of 8603 and 105 050 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found on the draft genome sequences of strain H7858 and strain F6854, respectively, when compared with strain F2365. Whole genome comparative analyses revealed that the L.monocytogenes genomes are essentially syntenic, with the majority of genomic differences consisting of phage insertions, transposable elements and SNPs.
ESTHER : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2004_Nucleic.Acids.Res_32_2386
PubMedID: 15115801
Gene_locus related to this paper: lismc-c1l0d9 , lismf-q71xq4 , lismo-LMO0110 , lismo-LMO0493 , lismo-LMO0580 , lismo-LMO0752 , lismo-LMO0760 , lismo-LMO0857 , lismo-LMO0950 , lismo-LMO0951 , lismo-LMO0977 , lismo-LMO1128 , lismo-LMO1258 , lismo-LMO1674 , lismo-LMO2089 , lismo-LMO2109 , lismo-LMO2433 , lismo-LMO2450 , lismo-LMO2452 , lismo-LMO2453 , lismo-LMO2578 , lismo-LMO2677 , lismo-LMO2755 , lismo-metx

Title : Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome - Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
Author(s) : Nierman WC , DeShazer D , Kim HS , Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Feldblyum T , Ulrich RL , Ronning CM , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , Davidsen TD , DeBoy RT , Dimitrov G , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Khouri H , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Mohammoud Y , Nelson WC , Radune D , Romero CM , Sarria S , Selengut J , Shamblin C , Sullivan SA , White O , Yu Y , Zafar N , Zhou L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14246 , 2004
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression profiling of the bacterium in hamster liver in vivo. The genome contains numerous insertion sequence elements that have mediated extensive deletions and rearrangements of the genome relative to Burkholderia pseudomallei. The genome also contains a vast number (>12,000) of simple sequence repeats. Variation in simple sequence repeats in key genes can provide a mechanism for generating antigenic variation that may account for the mammalian host's inability to mount a durable adaptive immune response to a B. mallei infection.
ESTHER : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14246
PubMedID: 15377793
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-hboh

Title : The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis Ames and comparison to closely related bacteria - Read_2003_Nature_423_81
Author(s) : Read TD , Peterson SN , Tourasse N , Baillie LW , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Tettelin H , Fouts DE , Eisen JA , Gill SR , Holtzapple EK , Okstad OA , Helgason E , Rilstone J , Wu M , Kolonay JF , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Brinkac LM , Gwinn M , DeBoy RT , Madpu R , Daugherty SC , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Pop M , Khouri HM , Radune D , Benton JL , Mahamoud Y , Jiang L , Hance IR , Weidman JF , Berry KJ , Plaut RD , Wolf AM , Watkins KL , Nierman WC , Hazen A , Cline R , Redmond C , Thwaite JE , White O , Salzberg SL , Thomason B , Friedlander AM , Koehler TM , Hanna PC , Kolsto AB , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 423 :81 , 2003
Abstract : Bacillus anthracis is an endospore-forming bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax. Key virulence genes are found on plasmids (extra-chromosomal, circular, double-stranded DNA molecules) pXO1 (ref. 2) and pXO2 (ref. 3). To identify additional genes that might contribute to virulence, we analysed the complete sequence of the chromosome of B. anthracis Ames (about 5.23 megabases). We found several chromosomally encoded proteins that may contribute to pathogenicity--including haemolysins, phospholipases and iron acquisition functions--and identified numerous surface proteins that might be important targets for vaccines and drugs. Almost all these putative chromosomal virulence and surface proteins have homologues in Bacillus cereus, highlighting the similarity of B. anthracis to near-neighbours that are not associated with anthrax. By performing a comparative genome hybridization of 19 B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains against a B. anthracis DNA microarray, we confirmed the general similarity of chromosomal genes among this group of close relatives. However, we found that the gene sequences of pXO1 and pXO2 were more variable between strains, suggesting plasmid mobility in the group. The complete sequence of B. anthracis is a step towards a better understanding of anthrax pathogenesis.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nature_423_81
PubMedID: 12721629
Gene_locus related to this paper: bacan-BA0160 , bacan-BA0950 , bacan-BA0954 , bacan-BA1019 , bacan-BA1242 , bacan-BA1727 , bacan-BA1747 , bacan-BA1866 , bacan-BA1914 , bacan-BA2015 , bacan-BA2392 , bacan-BA2417 , bacan-BA2557 , bacan-BA2607 , bacan-BA2687 , bacan-BA2694 , bacan-BA2738 , bacan-BA2865 , bacan-BA3068 , bacan-BA3165 , bacan-BA3178 , bacan-BA3187 , bacan-BA3343 , bacan-BA3372 , bacan-BA3703 , bacan-BA3805 , bacan-BA3863 , bacan-BA3877 , bacan-BA3887 , bacan-BA4324 , bacan-BA4328 , bacan-BA4338 , bacan-BA4577 , bacan-BA4983 , bacan-BA5009 , bacan-BA5110 , bacan-BA5136 , bacan-DHBF , bacan-q81tt2 , bacce-BC0192 , bacce-BC1788 , bacce-BC1954 , bacce-BC2141 , bacce-BC2171 , bacce-BC4730 , bacce-BC4862 , bacce-BC5130 , bacce-PHAC , bacce-q72yu1 , baccr-pepx

Title : The complete genome sequence of the Arabidopsis and tomato pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 - Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
Author(s) : Buell CR , Joardar V , Lindeberg M , Selengut J , Paulsen IT , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Daugherty S , Brinkac L , Beanan MJ , Haft DH , Nelson WC , Davidsen T , Zafar N , Zhou L , Liu J , Yuan Q , Khouri H , Fedorova N , Tran B , Russell D , Berry K , Utterback T , Van Aken SE , Feldblyum TV , D'Ascenzo M , Deng WL , Ramos AR , Alfano JR , Cartinhour S , Chatterjee AK , Delaney TP , Lazarowitz SG , Martin GB , Schneider DJ , Tang X , Bender CL , White O , Fraser CM , Collmer A
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 100 :10181 , 2003
Abstract : We report the complete genome sequence of the model bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 (DC3000), which is pathogenic on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. The DC3000 genome (6.5 megabases) contains a circular chromosome and two plasmids, which collectively encode 5,763 ORFs. We identified 298 established and putative virulence genes, including several clusters of genes encoding 31 confirmed and 19 predicted type III secretion system effector proteins. Many of the virulence genes were members of paralogous families and also were proximal to mobile elements, which collectively comprise 7% of the DC3000 genome. The bacterium possesses a large repertoire of transporters for the acquisition of nutrients, particularly sugars, as well as genes implicated in attachment to plant surfaces. Over 12% of the genes are dedicated to regulation, which may reflect the need for rapid adaptation to the diverse environments encountered during epiphytic growth and pathogenesis. Comparative analyses confirmed a high degree of similarity with two sequenced pseudomonads, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, yet revealed 1,159 genes unique to DC3000, of which 811 lack a known function.
ESTHER : Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
PubMedSearch : Buell_2003_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_100_10181
PubMedID: 12928499
Gene_locus related to this paper: pse14-q48ia0 , psesm-IRP1 , psesm-METX , psesm-q87y20 , psesm-q88a39 , psesm-q881b4 , psesm-q889k3 , psesy-BIOH , psesy-CFA7 , psesy-CFA9 , psesy-CMAT , psesy-ESTA , psesy-IRP4 , psesy-PHAB , psesy-PHAC , psesy-PHAG1 , psesy-PHAG2 , psesy-PIP , psesy-PSPTO0162 , psesy-PSPTO0421 , psesy-PSPTO0508 , psesy-PSPTO0675 , psesy-PSPTO0715 , psesy-PSPTO1154 , psesy-PSPTO1504 , psesy-PSPTO1559 , psesy-PSPTO1580 , psesy-PSPTO1604 , psesy-PSPTO1677 , psesy-PSPTO1766 , psesy-PSPTO1863 , psesy-PSPTO2042 , psesy-PSPTO2134 , psesy-PSPTO2150 , psesy-PSPTO2209 , psesy-PSPTO2217 , psesy-PSPTO2218 , psesy-PSPTO2293 , psesy-PSPTO2495 , psesy-PSPTO2674 , psesy-PSPTO2830 , psesy-PSPTO3135 , psesy-PSPTO3138 , psesy-PSPTO3264 , psesy-PSPTO3282 , psesy-PSPTO3306 , psesy-PSPTO3485 , psesy-PSPTO3572 , psesy-PSPTO3911 , psesy-PSPTO4089 , psesy-PSPTO4178 , psesy-PSPTO4277 , psesy-PSPTO4430 , psesy-PSPTO4519 , psesy-PSPTO4540 , psesy-PSPTO4699 , psesy-PSPTO4708 , psesy-PSPTO4781 , psesy-PSPTO4843 , psesy-PSPTO4964 , psesy-PSPTO5218 , psesy-PSPTO5299 , psesy-PSPTO5448 , psesy-PSPTO5537 , psesy-SYLD , psesy-SYPC , psesy-SYRE , psesm-q87v84

Title : Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens: metal reduction in subsurface environments - Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
Author(s) : Methe BA , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Paulsen IT , Nelson W , Heidelberg JF , Wu D , Wu M , Ward N , Beanan MJ , Dodson RJ , Madupu R , Brinkac LM , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Sullivan SA , Haft DH , Selengut J , Davidsen TM , Zafar N , White O , Tran B , Romero C , Forberger HA , Weidman J , Khouri H , Feldblyum TV , Utterback TR , Van Aken SE , Lovley DR , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 302 :1967 , 2003
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a delta-proteobacterium, reveals unsuspected capabilities, including evidence of aerobic metabolism, one-carbon and complex carbon metabolism, motility, and chemotactic behavior. These characteristics, coupled with the possession of many two-component sensors and many c-type cytochromes, reveal an ability to create alternative, redundant, electron transport networks and offer insights into the process of metal ion reduction in subsurface environments. As well as playing roles in the global cycling of metals and carbon, this organism clearly has the potential for use in bioremediation of radioactive metals and in the generation of electricity.
ESTHER : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedSearch : Methe_2003_Science_302_1967
PubMedID: 14671304
Gene_locus related to this paper: geosl-q74a54 , geosl-q74ac8 , geosl-q74eb1 , geosl-q747u4 , geosl-q747v8 , geosl-q749w4

Title : Genome sequence of Chlamydophila caviae (Chlamydia psittaci GPIC): examining the role of niche-specific genes in the evolution of the Chlamydiaceae - Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
Author(s) : Read TD , Myers GS , Brunham RC , Nelson WC , Paulsen IT , Heidelberg J , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Federova NB , Carty HA , Umayam LA , Haft DH , Peterson J , Beanan MJ , White O , Salzberg SL , Hsia RC , McClarty G , Rank RG , Bavoil PM , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 31 :2134 , 2003
Abstract : The genome of Chlamydophila caviae (formerly Chlamydia psittaci, GPIC isolate) (1 173 390 nt with a plasmid of 7966 nt) was determined, representing the fourth species with a complete genome sequence from the Chlamydiaceae family of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens. Of 1009 annotated genes, 798 were conserved in all three other completed Chlamydiaceae genomes. The C.caviae genome contains 68 genes that lack orthologs in any other completed chlamydial genomes, including tryptophan and thiamine biosynthesis determinants and a ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, the product of the prsA gene. Notable amongst these was a novel member of the virulence-associated invasin/intimin family (IIF) of Gram-negative bacteria. Intriguingly, two authentic frameshift mutations in the ORF indicate that this gene is not functional. Many of the unique genes are found in the replication termination region (RTR or plasticity zone), an area of frequent symmetrical inversion events around the replication terminus shown to be a hotspot for genome variation in previous genome sequencing studies. In C.caviae, the RTR includes several loci of particular interest including a large toxin gene and evidence of ancestral insertion(s) of a bacteriophage. This toxin gene, not present in Chlamydia pneumoniae, is a member of the YopT effector family of type III-secreted cysteine proteases. One gene cluster (guaBA-add) in the RTR is much more similar to orthologs in Chlamydia muridarum than those in the phylogenetically closest species C.pneumoniae, suggesting the possibility of horizontal transfer of genes between the rodent-associated Chlamydiae. With most genes observed in the other chlamydial genomes represented, C.caviae provides a good model for the Chlamydiaceae and a point of comparison against the human atherosclerosis-associated C.pneumoniae. This crucial addition to the set of completed Chlamydiaceae genome sequences is enabling dissection of the roles played by niche-specific genes in these important bacterial pathogens.
ESTHER : Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
PubMedSearch : Read_2003_Nucleic.Acids.Res_31_2134
PubMedID: 12682364
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlca-CCA00443 , chlca-CCA00510 , chlca-CCA00609 , chlca-CCA00614 , chlcv-p94660

Title : The Brucella suis genome reveals fundamental similarities between animal and plant pathogens and symbionts - Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
Author(s) : Paulsen IT , Seshadri R , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Read TD , Dodson RJ , Umayam L , Brinkac LM , Beanan MJ , Daugherty SC , DeBoy RT , Durkin AS , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Nelson WC , Ayodeji B , Kraul M , Shetty J , Malek J , Van Aken SE , Riedmuller S , Tettelin H , Gill SR , White O , Salzberg SL , Hoover DL , Lindler LE , Halling SM , Boyle SM , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 99 :13148 , 2002
Abstract : The 3.31-Mb genome sequence of the intracellular pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent, Brucella suis, was determined. Comparison of B. suis with Brucella melitensis has defined a finite set of differences that could be responsible for the differences in virulence and host preference between these organisms, and indicates that phage have played a significant role in their divergence. Analysis of the B. suis genome reveals transport and metabolic capabilities akin to soil/plant-associated bacteria. Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts. A limited repertoire of genes homologous to known bacterial virulence factors were identified.
ESTHER : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedSearch : Paulsen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_13148
PubMedID: 12271122
Gene_locus related to this paper: brume-BMEI0552 , brume-BMEI0733 , brume-BMEI1044 , brume-BMEI1119 , brume-BMEI1365 , brume-BMEI1594 , brume-BMEI1608 , brume-BMEI1822 , brume-BMEI1884 , brume-BMEI1951 , brume-BMEI2011 , brume-BMEII0047 , brume-BMEII0681 , brume-BMEII0989 , brume-PCAD , brusu-BR0288 , brusu-BR1291 , brusu-BR1327 , brusu-BRA0989

Title : Whole-genome comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical and laboratory strains - Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Alland D , Eisen JA , Carpenter L , White O , Peterson J , Deboy R , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Haft D , Hickey E , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Umayam LA , Ermolaeva M , Salzberg SL , Delcher A , Utterback T , Weidman J , Khouri H , Gill J , Mikula A , Bishai W , Jacobs Jr WR, Jr. , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 184 :5479 , 2002
Abstract : Virulence and immunity are poorly understood in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We sequenced the complete genome of the M. tuberculosis clinical strain CDC1551 and performed a whole-genome comparison with the laboratory strain H37Rv in order to identify polymorphic sequences with potential relevance to disease pathogenesis, immunity, and evolution. We found large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in numerous genes. Polymorphic loci included a phospholipase C, a membrane lipoprotein, members of an adenylate cyclase gene family, and members of the PE/PPE gene family, some of which have been implicated in virulence or the host immune response. Several gene families, including the PE/PPE gene family, also had significantly higher synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution frequencies compared to the genome as a whole. We tested a large sample of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates for a subset of the large-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and found widespread genetic variability at many of these loci. We performed phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis to investigate the evolutionary relationships among isolates and the origins of specific polymorphic loci. A number of these polymorphisms appear to have occurred multiple times as independent events, suggesting that these changes may be under selective pressure. Together, these results demonstrate that polymorphisms among M. tuberculosis strains are more extensive than initially anticipated, and genetic variation may have an important role in disease pathogenesis and immunity.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_2002_J.Bacteriol_184_5479
PubMedID: 12218036
Gene_locus related to this paper: myctu-a85a , myctu-a85b , myctu-a85c , myctu-bpoC , myctu-d5yk66 , myctu-ephA , myctu-ephB , myctu-ephc , myctu-ephd , myctu-ephE , myctu-ephF , myctu-hpx , myctu-linb , myctu-lipG , myctu-LPQP , myctu-MBTB , myctu-metx , myctu-mpt51 , myctu-MT3441 , myctu-p71654 , myctu-p95011 , myctu-PKS6 , myctu-PKS13 , myctu-ppe42 , myctu-ppe63 , myctu-Rv1430 , myctu-RV0045C , myctu-Rv0077c , myctu-Rv0151c , myctu-Rv0152c , myctu-Rv0159c , myctu-Rv0160c , myctu-rv0183 , myctu-Rv0217c , myctu-Rv0220 , myctu-Rv0272c , myctu-RV0293C , myctu-RV0421C , myctu-RV0457C , myctu-RV0519C , myctu-RV0774C , myctu-RV0782 , myctu-RV0840C , myctu-Rv1069c , myctu-Rv1076 , myctu-RV1123C , myctu-Rv1184c , myctu-Rv1190 , myctu-Rv1191 , myctu-RV1192 , myctu-RV1215C , myctu-Rv1399c , myctu-Rv1400c , myctu-RV1639C , myctu-RV1683 , myctu-RV1758 , myctu-Rv1800 , myctu-Rv1833c , myctu-Rv2045c , myctu-RV2054 , myctu-Rv2284 , myctu-RV2296 , myctu-Rv2385 , myctu-Rv2485c , myctu-RV2627C , myctu-RV2672 , myctu-RV2695 , myctu-RV2765 , myctu-RV2800 , myctu-RV2854 , myctu-Rv2970c , myctu-Rv3084 , myctu-Rv3097c , myctu-rv3177 , myctu-Rv3312c , myctu-RV3452 , myctu-Rv3487c , myctu-Rv3569c , myctu-Rv3591c , myctu-RV3724 , myctu-Rv3802c , myctu-Rv3822 , myctu-y0571 , myctu-y963 , myctu-Y1834 , myctu-y1835 , myctu-y2079 , myctu-Y2307 , myctu-yc88 , myctu-ym23 , myctu-ym24 , myctu-YR15 , myctu-yt28

Title : Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Hall N , Fung E , White O , Berriman M , Hyman RW , Carlton JM , Pain A , Nelson KE , Bowman S , Paulsen IT , James K , Eisen JA , Rutherford K , Salzberg SL , Craig A , Kyes S , Chan MS , Nene V , Shallom SJ , Suh B , Peterson J , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , Haft D , Mather MW , Vaidya AB , Martin DM , Fairlamb AH , Fraunholz MJ , Roos DS , Ralph SA , McFadden GI , Cummings LM , Subramanian GM , Mungall C , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Newbold C , Davis RW , Fraser CM , Barrell B
Ref : Nature , 419 :498 , 2002
Abstract : The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the genomes of free-living eukaryotic microbes, the genome of this intracellular parasite encodes fewer enzymes and transporters, but a large proportion of genes are devoted to immune evasion and host-parasite interactions. Many nuclear-encoded proteins are targeted to the apicoplast, an organelle involved in fatty-acid and isoprenoid metabolism. The genome sequence provides the foundation for future studies of this organism, and is being exploited in the search for new drugs and vaccines to fight malaria.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_498
PubMedID: 12368864
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plaf7-q8i5y6 , plaf7-q8iik5 , plafa-PF10.0018 , plafa-PF10.0020 , plafa-PF10.0379 , plafa-PF11.0211 , plafa-PF11.0276 , plafa-PF11.0441 , plafa-PF14.0015 , plafa-PF14.0017 , plafa-PF14.0099 , plafa-PF14.0250 , plafa-PF14.0395 , plafa-PF14.0737 , plafa-PF14.0738 , plafa-PFL2530W

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 2, 10, 11 and 14 - Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Shallom SJ , Carlton JM , Salzberg SL , Nene V , Shoaibi A , Ciecko A , Lynn J , Rizzo M , Weaver B , Jarrahi B , Brenner M , Parvizi B , Tallon L , Moazzez A , Granger D , Fujii C , Hansen C , Pederson J , Feldblyum T , Peterson J , Suh B , Angiuoli S , Pertea M , Allen J , Selengut J , White O , Cummings LM , Smith HO , Adams MD , Venter JC , Carucci DJ , Hoffman SL , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 419 :531 , 2002
Abstract : The mosquito-borne malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum kills an estimated 0.7-2.7 million people every year, primarily children in sub-Saharan Africa. Without effective interventions, a variety of factors-including the spread of parasites resistant to antimalarial drugs and the increasing insecticide resistance of mosquitoes-may cause the number of malaria cases to double over the next two decades. To stimulate basic research and facilitate the development of new drugs and vaccines, the genome of Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 has been sequenced using a chromosome-by-chromosome shotgun strategy. We report here the nucleotide sequences of chromosomes 10, 11 and 14, and a re-analysis of the chromosome 2 sequence. These chromosomes represent about 35% of the 23-megabase P. falciparum genome.
ESTHER : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedSearch : Gardner_2002_Nature_419_531
PubMedID: 12368868
Gene_locus related to this paper: plafa-MAL3P8.11

Title : Genome sequence of the dissimilatory metal ion-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis - Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Gaidos EJ , Nelson WC , Read TD , Eisen JA , Seshadri R , Ward N , Methe B , Clayton RA , Meyer T , Tsapin A , Scott J , Beanan M , Brinkac L , Daugherty S , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Madupu R , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Wolf AM , Vamathevan J , Weidman J , Impraim M , Lee K , Berry K , Lee C , Mueller J , Khouri H , Gill J , Utterback TR , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Smith HO , Venter JC , Nealson KH , Fraser CM
Ref : Nat Biotechnol , 20 :1118 , 2002
Abstract : Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities, conferred in part by multicomponent, branched electron transport systems. Here we report the sequencing of the S. oneidensis genome, which consists of a 4,969,803-base pair circular chromosome with 4,758 predicted protein-encoding open reading frames (CDS) and a 161,613-base pair plasmid with 173 CDSs. We identified the first Shewanella lambda-like phage, providing a potential tool for further genome engineering. Genome analysis revealed 39 c-type cytochromes, including 32 previously unidentified in S. oneidensis, and a novel periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase, which are integral members of the electron transport system. This genome sequence represents a critical step in the elucidation of the pathways for reduction (and bioremediation) of pollutants such as uranium (U) and chromium (Cr), and offers a starting point for defining this organism's complex electron transport systems and metal ion-reducing capabilities.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2002_Nat.Biotechnol_20_1118
PubMedID: 12368813
Gene_locus related to this paper: sheon-BIOH , sheon-LYPA , sheon-PIP , sheon-PTRB , sheon-q8ej95 , sheon-SO0071 , sheon-SO0614 , sheon-SO0616 , sheon-SO0801 , sheon-SO0880 , sheoe-SO0967 , sheon-SO1006 , sheon-SO1224 , sheon-SO1310 , sheon-SO1534 , sheon-SO1539 , sheon-SO1686 , sheon-SO1743 , sheon-SO1976 , sheon-SO1999 , sheon-SO2024 , sheon-SO2047 , sheon-SO2055 , sheon-SO2223 , sheon-SO2333 , sheon-SO2473 , sheon-SO2582 , sheon-SO2753 , sheon-SO2934 , sheon-SO3025 , sheon-SO3900 , sheon-SO3990 , sheon-SO4252 , sheon-SO4400 , sheon-SO4537 , sheon-SO4543 , sheon-SO4574 , sheon-SO4618 , sheon-SO4650 , sheon-SOA0048 , shefn-SfSFGH , sheon-ym51

Title : The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium - Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
Author(s) : Eisen JA , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Heidelberg JF , Wu M , Dodson RJ , Deboy R , Gwinn ML , Nelson WC , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Durkin AS , Kolonay JL , Yang F , Holt I , Umayam LA , Mason T , Brenner M , Shea TP , Parksey D , Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Hansen CL , Craven MB , Radune D , Vamathevan J , Khouri H , White O , Gruber TM , Ketchum KA , Venter JC , Tettelin H , Bryant DA , Fraser CM
Ref : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 99 :9509 , 2002
Abstract : The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel roles in photosynthesis or photobiology. Phylogenomic analysis reveals likely duplications of genes involved in biosynthetic pathways for photosynthesis and the metabolism of sulfur and nitrogen as well as strong similarities between metabolic processes in C. tepidum and many Archaeal species.
ESTHER : Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
PubMedSearch : Eisen_2002_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_99_9509
PubMedID: 12093901
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlte-CT0177 , chlte-CT0524 , chlte-CT0717 , chlte-CT0947 , chlte-CT1208 , chlte-CT1253 , chlte-CT1301 , chlte-CT1312 , chlte-CT1856 , chlte-CT1908 , chlte-CT2087 , chlte-CT2271 , chlte-MENH , chlte-MET2 , chlte-q4w546 , chlte-q8kgb8

Title : Full-length messenger RNA sequences greatly improve genome annotation - Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
Author(s) : Haas BJ , Volfovsky N , Town CD , Troukhan M , Alexandrov N , Feldmann KA , Flavell RB , White O , Salzberg SL
Ref : Genome Biol , 3 :RESEARCH0029 , 2002
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Annotation of eukaryotic genomes is a complex endeavor that requires the integration of evidence from multiple, often contradictory, sources. With the ever-increasing amount of genome sequence data now available, methods for accurate identification of large numbers of genes have become urgently needed. In an effort to create a set of very high-quality gene models, we used the sequence of 5,000 full-length gene transcripts from Arabidopsis to re-annotate its genome. We have mapped these transcripts to their exact chromosomal locations and, using alignment programs, have created gene models that provide a reference set for this organism.
RESULTS: Approximately 35% of the transcripts indicated that previously annotated genes needed modification, and 5% of the transcripts represented newly discovered genes. We also discovered that multiple transcription initiation sites appear to be much more common than previously known, and we report numerous cases of alternative mRNA splicing. We include a comparison of different alignment software and an analysis of how the transcript data improved the previously published annotation.
CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that sequencing of large numbers of full-length transcripts followed by computational mapping greatly improves identification of the complete exon structures of eukaryotic genes. In addition, we are able to find numerous introns in the untranslated regions of the genes.
ESTHER : Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
PubMedSearch : Haas_2002_Genome.Biol_3_RESEARCH0029
PubMedID: 12093376
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-AT1G74640 , arath-At2g47630 , arath-AT4G17480 , arath-AT4G24380 , arath-At5g11650 , arath-AT5G19290 , arath-AT5G19630 , arath-AT5G20060 , arath-AT5G20520 , arath-AtD14 , arath-F1O17.3 , arath-F1O17.5 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F12L6.7 , arath-F22K18.40 , arath-At3g60340 , arath-LCAT1 , arath-PLA16 , arath-Q8L996 , arath-q8lae9 , arath-Q8LF34 , arath-Q8LFB7 , arath-Q8LFU1 , arath-q8s8g6 , arath-q9ffg7 , arath-Q9LNR2 , arath-SCP40 , arath-At4g12230 , arath-AT4G10030 , arath-T5M16.2 , arath-MES14 , arath-T19F11.2 , arath-Y1457 , arath-T26B15.8 , arath-SFGH , arath-f4jt64

Title : Complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of the metabolically versatile Pseudomonas putida KT2440 - Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Weinel C , Paulsen IT , Dodson RJ , Hilbert H , Martins dos Santos VA , Fouts DE , Gill SR , Pop M , Holmes M , Brinkac L , Beanan M , DeBoy RT , Daugherty S , Kolonay J , Madupu R , Nelson W , White O , Peterson J , Khouri H , Hance I , Chris Lee P , Holtzapple E , Scanlan D , Tran K , Moazzez A , Utterback T , Rizzo M , Lee K , Kosack D , Moestl D , Wedler H , Lauber J , Stjepandic D , Hoheisel J , Straetz M , Heim S , Kiewitz C , Eisen JA , Timmis KN , Dusterhoft A , Tummler B , Fraser CM
Ref : Environ Microbiol , 4 :799 , 2002
Abstract : Pseudomonas putida is a metabolically versatile saprophytic soil bacterium that has been certified as a biosafety host for the cloning of foreign genes. The bacterium also has considerable potential for biotechnological applications. Sequence analysis of the 6.18 Mb genome of strain KT2440 reveals diverse transport and metabolic systems. Although there is a high level of genome conservation with the pathogenic Pseudomonad Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85% of the predicted coding regions are shared), key virulence factors including exotoxin A and type III secretion systems are absent. Analysis of the genome gives insight into the non-pathogenic nature of P. putida and points to potential new applications in agriculture, biocatalysis, bioremediation and bioplastic production.
ESTHER : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedSearch : Nelson_2002_Environ.Microbiol_4_799
PubMedID: 12534463
Gene_locus related to this paper: psep1-a5wa77 , psep1-a5wax1 , psepk-q88nk6 , psepk-q88qt0 , psepu-acoc , psepu-BIOH , psepu-bpest , psepu-ESTB , psepu-LIP , psepu-METX , psepu-PHAC1 , psepu-PHAC2 , psepu-PHAG , psepu-PHAZ , psepu-PIP , psepu-PP0375 , psepu-PP0498 , psepu-PP0532 , psepu-PP1064 , psepu-PP1184 , psepu-PP1310 , psepu-PP1500 , psepu-PP1617 , psepu-PP1829 , psepu-PP1979 , psepu-PP2083 , psepu-PP2201 , psepu-PP2236 , psepu-PP2567 , psepu-PP2804 , psepu-PP2934 , psepu-PP3195 , psepu-PP3367 , psepu-PP3404 , psepu-PP3645 , psepu-PP3807 , psepu-PP3812 , psepu-PP3943 , psepu-PP4164 , psepu-PP4165 , psepu-PP4178 , psepu-PP4249 , psepu-PP4540 , psepu-PP4551 , psepu-PP4583 , psepu-PP4624 , psepu-PP4634 , psepu-PP4916 , psepu-PP5117 , psepu-PP5161 , psepu-PP5167 , psepu-PPSD , psepu-Q8KQK1 , psepu-q9wwz4

Title : The genome of M. acetivorans reveals extensive metabolic and physiological diversity - Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
Author(s) : Galagan JE , Nusbaum C , Roy A , Endrizzi MG , Macdonald P , FitzHugh W , Calvo S , Engels R , Smirnov S , Atnoor D , Brown A , Allen N , Naylor J , Stange-Thomann N , DeArellano K , Johnson R , Linton L , McEwan P , McKernan K , Talamas J , Tirrell A , Ye W , Zimmer A , Barber RD , Cann I , Graham DE , Grahame DA , Guss AM , Hedderich R , Ingram-Smith C , Kuettner HC , Krzycki JA , Leigh JA , Li W , Liu J , Mukhopadhyay B , Reeve JN , Smith K , Springer TA , Umayam LA , White O , White RH , Conway de Macario E , Ferry JG , Jarrell KF , Jing H , Macario AJ , Paulsen I , Pritchett M , Sowers KR , Swanson RV , Zinder SH , Lander E , Metcalf WW , Birren B
Ref : Genome Res , 12 :532 , 2002
Abstract : Methanogenesis, the biological production of methane, plays a pivotal role in the global carbon cycle and contributes significantly to global warming. The majority of methane in nature is derived from acetate. Here we report the complete genome sequence of an acetate-utilizing methanogen, Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A. Methanosarcineae are the most metabolically diverse methanogens, thrive in a broad range of environments, and are unique among the Archaea in forming complex multicellular structures. This diversity is reflected in the genome of M. acetivorans. At 5,751,492 base pairs it is by far the largest known archaeal genome. The 4524 open reading frames code for a strikingly wide and unanticipated variety of metabolic and cellular capabilities. The presence of novel methyltransferases indicates the likelihood of undiscovered natural energy sources for methanogenesis, whereas the presence of single-subunit carbon monoxide dehydrogenases raises the possibility of nonmethanogenic growth. Although motility has not been observed in any Methanosarcineae, a flagellin gene cluster and two complete chemotaxis gene clusters were identified. The availability of genetic methods, coupled with its physiological and metabolic diversity, makes M. acetivorans a powerful model organism for the study of archaeal biology. [Sequence, data, annotations and analyses are available at http://www-genome.wi.mit.edu/.]
ESTHER : Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
PubMedSearch : Galagan_2002_Genome.Res_12_532
PubMedID: 11932238
Gene_locus related to this paper: metac-MA0077 , metac-MA0362 , metac-MA0419 , metac-MA0736 , metac-MA0993 , metac-MA1571 , metac-MA1856 , metac-MA1857 , metac-MA2002 , metac-MA2343 , metac-MA2629 , metac-MA2691 , metac-MA2743 , metac-MA2933 , metac-MA3611 , metac-MA3635 , metac-MA3920 , metac-META

Title : Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus - Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
Author(s) : Nierman WC , Feldblyum TV , Laub MT , Paulsen IT , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Alley MR , Ohta N , Maddock JR , Potocka I , Nelson WC , Newton A , Stephens C , Phadke ND , Ely B , DeBoy RT , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn ML , Haft DH , Kolonay JF , Smit J , Craven MB , Khouri H , Shetty J , Berry K , Utterback T , Tran K , Wolf A , Vamathevan J , Ermolaeva M , White O , Salzberg SL , Venter JC , Shapiro L , Fraser CM
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 98 :4136 , 2001
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus was determined to be 4,016,942 base pairs in a single circular chromosome encoding 3,767 genes. This organism, which grows in a dilute aquatic environment, coordinates the cell division cycle and multiple cell differentiation events. With the annotated genome sequence, a full description of the genetic network that controls bacterial differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle progression is within reach. Two-component signal transduction proteins are known to play a significant role in cell cycle progression. Genome analysis revealed that the C. crescentus genome encodes a significantly higher number of these signaling proteins (105) than any bacterial genome sequenced thus far. Another regulatory mechanism involved in cell cycle progression is DNA methylation. The occurrence of the recognition sequence for an essential DNA methylating enzyme that is required for cell cycle regulation is severely limited and shows a bias to intergenic regions. The genome contains multiple clusters of genes encoding proteins essential for survival in a nutrient poor habitat. Included are those involved in chemotaxis, outer membrane channel function, degradation of aromatic ring compounds, and the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources, in addition to many extracytoplasmic function sigma factors, providing the organism with the ability to respond to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. C. crescentus is, to our knowledge, the first free-living alpha-class proteobacterium to be sequenced and will serve as a foundation for exploring the biology of this group of bacteria, which includes the obligate endosymbiont and human pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and the bovine and human pathogen Brucella abortus.
ESTHER : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedSearch : Nierman_2001_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_98_4136
PubMedID: 11259647
Gene_locus related to this paper: caucr-CC0087 , caucr-CC0223 , caucr-CC0341 , caucr-CC0352 , caucr-CC0355 , caucr-CC0384 , caucr-CC0477 , caucr-CC0478 , caucr-CC0525 , caucr-CC0552 , caucr-CC0771 , caucr-CC0799 , caucr-CC0847 , caucr-CC0936 , caucr-CC0940 , caucr-CC1048 , caucr-CC1053 , caucr-CC1175 , caucr-CC1226 , caucr-CC1227 , caucr-CC1229 , caucr-CC1499 , caucr-CC1622 , caucr-CC1734 , caucr-CC1867 , caucr-CC1986 , caucr-CC2083 , caucr-CC2154 , caucr-CC2185 , caucr-CC2230 , caucr-CC2253 , caucr-CC2298 , caucr-CC2313 , caucr-CC2358 , caucr-CC2395 , caucr-CC2411 , caucr-CC2515 , caucr-CC2565 , caucr-CC2671 , caucr-CC2710 , caucr-CC2763 , caucr-CC2797 , caucr-CC3039 , caucr-CC3091 , caucr-CC3099 , caucr-CC3204 , caucr-CC3246 , caucr-CC3300 , caucr-CC3308 , caucr-CC3346 , caucr-CC3418 , caucr-CC3441 , caucr-CC3442 , caucr-CC3634 , caucr-CC3687 , caucr-CC3688 , caucr-CC3723 , caucr-CC3725 , caucr-CC3758 , caucr-PHAZ , caucr-PHBC , caucr-q9a8c1 , caucr-q9aac8

Title : Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae - Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Nelson KE , Paulsen IT , Eisen JA , Read TD , Peterson S , Heidelberg J , DeBoy RT , Haft DH , Dodson RJ , Durkin AS , Gwinn M , Kolonay JF , Nelson WC , Peterson JD , Umayam LA , White O , Salzberg SL , Lewis MR , Radune D , Holtzapple E , Khouri H , Wolf AM , Utterback TR , Hansen CL , McDonald LA , Feldblyum TV , Angiuoli S , Dickinson T , Hickey EK , Holt IE , Loftus BJ , Yang F , Smith HO , Venter JC , Dougherty BA , Morrison DA , Hollingshead SK , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 293 :498 , 2001
Abstract : The 2,160,837-base pair genome sequence of an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive pathogen that causes pneumonia, bacteremia, meningitis, and otitis media, contains 2236 predicted coding regions; of these, 1440 (64%) were assigned a biological role. Approximately 5% of the genome is composed of insertion sequences that may contribute to genome rearrangements through uptake of foreign DNA. Extracellular enzyme systems for the metabolism of polysaccharides and hexosamines provide a substantial source of carbon and nitrogen for S. pneumoniae and also damage host tissues and facilitate colonization. A motif identified within the signal peptide of proteins is potentially involved in targeting these proteins to the cell surface of low-guanine/cytosine (GC) Gram-positive species. Several surface-exposed proteins that may serve as potential vaccine candidates were identified. Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2001_Science_293_498
PubMedID: 11463916
Gene_locus related to this paper: strp2-q04l35 , strpj-b8zns7 , strpn-AXE1 , strpn-b2dz20 , strpn-pepx , strpn-SP0614 , strpn-SP0666 , strpn-SP0777 , strpn-SP0902 , strpn-SP1343

Title : Complete genome sequence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strain MC58 - Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
Author(s) : Tettelin H , Saunders NJ , Heidelberg J , Jeffries AC , Nelson KE , Eisen JA , Ketchum KA , Hood DW , Peden JF , Dodson RJ , Nelson WC , Gwinn ML , Deboy R , Peterson JD , Hickey EK , Haft DH , Salzberg SL , White O , Fleischmann RD , Dougherty BA , Mason T , Ciecko A , Parksey DS , Blair E , Cittone H , Clark EB , Cotton MD , Utterback TR , Khouri H , Qin H , Vamathevan J , Gill J , Scarlato V , Masignani V , Pizza M , Grandi G , Sun L , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Moxon ER , Rappuoli R , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :1809 , 2000
Abstract : The 2,272,351-base pair genome of Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 (serogroup B), a causative agent of meningitis and septicemia, contains 2158 predicted coding regions, 1158 (53.7%) of which were assigned a biological role. Three major islands of horizontal DNA transfer were identified; two of these contain genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenicity, and the third island contains coding sequences only for hypothetical proteins. Insights into the commensal and virulence behavior of N. meningitidis can be gleaned from the genome, in which sequences for structural proteins of the pilus are clustered and several coding regions unique to serogroup B capsular polysaccharide synthesis can be identified. Finally, N. meningitidis contains more genes that undergo phase variation than any pathogen studied to date, a mechanism that controls their expression and contributes to the evasion of the host immune system.
ESTHER : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedSearch : Tettelin_2000_Science_287_1809
PubMedID: 10710307
Gene_locus related to this paper: neigo-pip , neima-metx , neimb-q9k0t9 , neime-ESD , neime-NMA2216 , neime-NMB0276 , neime-NMB0868 , neime-NMB1828 , neime-NMB1877

Title : Genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis MoPn and Chlamydia pneumoniae AR39 - Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
Author(s) : Read TD , Brunham RC , Shen C , Gill SR , Heidelberg JF , White O , Hickey EK , Peterson J , Utterback T , Berry K , Bass S , Linher K , Weidman J , Khouri H , Craven B , Bowman C , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Nelson W , Deboy R , Kolonay J , McClarty G , Salzberg SL , Eisen J , Fraser CM
Ref : Nucleic Acids Research , 28 :1397 , 2000
Abstract : The genome sequences of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) strain Nigg (1 069 412 nt) and Chlamydia pneumoniae strain AR39 (1 229 853 nt) were determined using a random shotgun strategy. The MoPn genome exhibited a general conservation of gene order and content with the previously sequenced C.trachomatis serovar D. Differences between C.trachomatis strains were focused on an approximately 50 kb 'plasticity zone' near the termination origins. In this region MoPn contained three copies of a novel gene encoding a >3000 amino acid toxin homologous to a predicted toxin from Escherichia coli O157:H7 but had apparently lost the tryptophan biosyntheis genes found in serovar D in this region. The C. pneumoniae AR39 chromosome was >99.9% identical to the previously sequenced C.pneumoniae CWL029 genome, however, comparative analysis identified an invertible DNA segment upstream of the uridine kinase gene which was in different orientations in the two genomes. AR39 also contained a novel 4524 nt circular single-stranded (ss)DNA bacteriophage, the first time a virus has been reported infecting C. pneumoniae. Although the chlamydial genomes were highly conserved, there were intriguing differences in key nucleotide salvage pathways: C.pneumoniae has a uridine kinase gene for dUTP production, MoPn has a uracil phosphororibosyl transferase, while C.trachomatis serovar D contains neither gene. Chromosomal comparison revealed that there had been multiple large inversion events since the species divergence of C.trachomatis and C.pneumoniae, apparently oriented around the axis of the origin of replication and the termination region. The striking synteny of the Chlamydia genomes and prevalence of tandemly duplicated genes are evidence of minimal chromosome rearrangement and foreign gene uptake, presumably owing to the ecological isolation of the obligate intracellular parasites. In the absence of genetic analysis, comparative genomics will continue to provide insight into the virulence mechanisms of these important human pathogens.
ESTHER : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedSearch : Read_2000_Nucleic.Acids.Res_28_1397
PubMedID: 10684935
Gene_locus related to this paper: chlmu-TC0345 , chlmu-TC0413 , chlmu-TC0426 , chlmu-TC0478 , chlpn-CPJ0152 , chlpn-CPJ0342 , chlpn-CPN0161 , chlpn-CPN0271 , chlpn-q9jrv1 , chlpn-q9js10 , chlpn-q9k1u7 , chlpn-q9z6x9

Title : DNA sequence of both chromosomes of the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae - Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
Author(s) : Heidelberg JF , Eisen JA , Nelson WC , Clayton RA , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Umayam L , Gill SR , Nelson KE , Read TD , Tettelin H , Richardson D , Ermolaeva MD , Vamathevan J , Bass S , Qin H , Dragoi I , Sellers P , McDonald L , Utterback T , Fleishmann RD , Nierman WC , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Colwell RR , Mekalanos JJ , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 406 :477 , 2000
Abstract : Here we determine the complete genomic sequence of the gram negative, gamma-Proteobacterium Vibrio cholerae El Tor N16961 to be 4,033,460 base pairs (bp). The genome consists of two circular chromosomes of 2,961,146 bp and 1,072,314 bp that together encode 3,885 open reading frames. The vast majority of recognizable genes for essential cell functions (such as DNA replication, transcription, translation and cell-wall biosynthesis) and pathogenicity (for example, toxins, surface antigens and adhesins) are located on the large chromosome. In contrast, the small chromosome contains a larger fraction (59%) of hypothetical genes compared with the large chromosome (42%), and also contains many more genes that appear to have origins other than the gamma-Proteobacteria. The small chromosome also carries a gene capture system (the integron island) and host 'addiction' genes that are typically found on plasmids; thus, the small chromosome may have originally been a megaplasmid that was captured by an ancestral Vibrio species. The V. cholerae genomic sequence provides a starting point for understanding how a free-living, environmental organism emerged to become a significant human bacterial pathogen.
ESTHER : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedSearch : Heidelberg_2000_Nature_406_477
PubMedID: 10952301
Gene_locus related to this paper: vibch-rtxAABH , vibch-lipas , vibch-VC0135 , vibch-VC0522 , vibch-VC1418 , vibch-VC1725 , vibch-VC1974 , vibch-VC1986 , vibch-VC2097 , vibch-VC2432 , vibch-VC2610 , vibch-VC2718 , vibch-VCA0063 , vibch-VCA0092 , vibch-VCA0490 , vibch-VCA0688 , vibch-VCA0754 , vibch-VCA0863 , vibch-y1892 , vibch-y2276

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 3 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
Author(s) : Salanoubat M , Lemcke K , Rieger M , Ansorge W , Unseld M , Fartmann B , Valle G , Blocker H , Perez-Alonso M , Obermaier B , Delseny M , Boutry M , Grivell LA , Mache R , Puigdomenech P , de Simone V , Choisne N , Artiguenave F , Robert C , Brottier P , Wincker P , Cattolico L , Weissenbach J , Saurin W , Quetier F , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Benes V , Wurmbach E , Drzonek H , Erfle H , Jordan N , Bangert S , Wiedelmann R , Kranz H , Voss H , Holland R , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Vezzi A , D'Angelo M , Pallavicini A , Toppo S , Simionati B , Conrad A , Hornischer K , Kauer G , Lohnert TH , Nordsiek G , Reichelt J , Scharfe M , Schon O , Bargues M , Terol J , Climent J , Navarro P , Collado C , Perez-Perez A , Ottenwalder B , Duchemin D , Cooke R , Laudie M , Berger-Llauro C , Purnelle B , Masuy D , de Haan M , Maarse AC , Alcaraz JP , Cottet A , Casacuberta E , Monfort A , Argiriou A , Flores M , Liguori R , Vitale D , Mannhaupt G , Haase D , Schoof H , Rudd S , Zaccaria P , Mewes HW , Mayer KF , Kaul S , Town CD , Koo HL , Tallon LJ , Jenkins J , Rooney T , Rizzo M , Walts A , Utterback T , Fujii CY , Shea TP , Creasy TH , Haas B , Maiti R , Wu D , Peterson J , Van Aken S , Pai G , Militscher J , Sellers P , Gill JE , Feldblyum TV , Preuss D , Lin X , Nierman WC , Salzberg SL , White O , Venter JC , Fraser CM , Kaneko T , Nakamura Y , Sato S , Kato T , Asamizu E , Sasamoto S , Kimura T , Idesawa K , Kawashima K , Kishida Y , Kiyokawa C , Kohara M , Matsumoto M , Matsuno A , Muraki A , Nakayama S , Nakazaki N , Shinpo S , Takeuchi C , Wada T , Watanabe A , Yamada M , Yasuda M , Tabata S
Ref : Nature , 408 :820 , 2000
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for plant biologists. In 1996 an international collaboration (the Arabidopsis Genome Initiative) was formed to sequence the whole genome of Arabidopsis and in 1999 the sequence of the first two chromosomes was reported. The sequence of the last three chromosomes and an analysis of the whole genome are reported in this issue. Here we present the sequence of chromosome 3, organized into four sequence segments (contigs). The two largest (13.5 and 9.2 Mb) correspond to the top (long) and the bottom (short) arms of chromosome 3, and the two small contigs are located in the genetically defined centromere. This chromosome encodes 5,220 of the roughly 25,500 predicted protein-coding genes in the genome. About 20% of the predicted proteins have significant homology to proteins in eukaryotic genomes for which the complete sequence is available, pointing to important conserved cellular functions among eukaryotes.
ESTHER : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedSearch : Salanoubat_2000_Nature_408_820
PubMedID: 11130713
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-MES17 , arath-AT3G12150 , arath-At3g61680 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CXE12 , arath-eds1 , arath-SCP25 , arath-F1P2.110 , arath-F1P2.140 , arath-F11F8.28 , arath-F14D17.80 , arath-F16B3.4 , arath-SCP27 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-At3g05600 , arath-PAD4 , arath-At3g51000 , arath-SCP16 , arath-gid1 , arath-GID1B , arath-Q9LUG8 , arath-Q84JS1 , arath-Q9SFF6 , arath-q9m236 , arath-q9sr22 , arath-q9sr23 , arath-SCP7 , arath-SCP14 , arath-SCP15 , arath-SCP17 , arath-SCP36 , arath-SCP37 , arath-SCP39 , arath-SCP40 , arath-SCP49 , arath-T19F11.2

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 1 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
Author(s) : Theologis A , Ecker JR , Palm CJ , Federspiel NA , Kaul S , White O , Alonso J , Altafi H , Araujo R , Bowman CL , Brooks SY , Buehler E , Chan A , Chao Q , Chen H , Cheuk RF , Chin CW , Chung MK , Conn L , Conway AB , Conway AR , Creasy TH , Dewar K , Dunn P , Etgu P , Feldblyum TV , Feng J , Fong B , Fujii CY , Gill JE , Goldsmith AD , Haas B , Hansen NF , Hughes B , Huizar L , Hunter JL , Jenkins J , Johnson-Hopson C , Khan S , Khaykin E , Kim CJ , Koo HL , Kremenetskaia I , Kurtz DB , Kwan A , Lam B , Langin-Hooper S , Lee A , Lee JM , Lenz CA , Li JH , Li Y , Lin X , Liu SX , Liu ZA , Luros JS , Maiti R , Marziali A , Militscher J , Miranda M , Nguyen M , Nierman WC , Osborne BI , Pai G , Peterson J , Pham PK , Rizzo M , Rooney T , Rowley D , Sakano H , Salzberg SL , Schwartz JR , Shinn P , Southwick AM , Sun H , Tallon LJ , Tambunga G , Toriumi MJ , Town CD , Utterback T , Van Aken S , Vaysberg M , Vysotskaia VS , Walker M , Wu D , Yu G , Fraser CM , Venter JC , Davis RW
Ref : Nature , 408 :816 , 2000
Abstract : The genome of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana has five chromosomes. Here we report the sequence of the largest, chromosome 1, in two contigs of around 14.2 and 14.6 megabases. The contigs extend from the telomeres to the centromeric borders, regions rich in transposons, retrotransposons and repetitive elements such as the 180-base-pair repeat. The chromosome represents 25% of the genome and contains about 6,850 open reading frames, 236 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and 12 small nuclear RNAs. There are two clusters of tRNA genes at different places on the chromosome. One consists of 27 tRNA(Pro) genes and the other contains 27 tandem repeats of tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Tyr)-tRNA(Ser) genes. Chromosome 1 contains about 300 gene families with clustered duplications. There are also many repeat elements, representing 8% of the sequence.
ESTHER : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedSearch : Theologis_2000_Nature_408_816
PubMedID: 11130712
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At1g05790 , arath-At1g09280 , arath-At1g09980 , arath-AT1G29120 , arath-AT1G52695 , arath-AT1G66900 , arath-At1g73750 , arath-AT1G73920 , arath-AT1G74640 , arath-AT1G76140 , arath-AT1G78210 , arath-clh1 , arath-F1O17.3 , arath-F1O17.4 , arath-F1O17.5 , arath-F5I6.3 , arath-At1g52700 , arath-F6D8.27 , arath-F6D8.32 , arath-F9L1.44 , arath-F9P14.11 , arath-F12A4.4 , arath-MES11 , arath-F14G24.2 , arath-F14G24.3 , arath-F14I3.4 , arath-F14O10.2 , arath-F16N3.25 , arath-LCAT2 , arath-At1g34340 , arath-MES15 , arath-CXE6 , arath-ICML1 , arath-At1g72620 , arath-LCAT1 , arath-PLA12 , arath-PLA15 , arath-PLA17 , arath-Q8L7S1 , arath-At1g15070 , arath-SCP2 , arath-SCP4 , arath-SCP5 , arath-SCP18 , arath-SCP32 , arath-SCP44 , arath-SCP45 , arath-SCPL6 , arath-F4IE65 , arath-At1g30370 , arath-T6L1.8 , arath-T6L1.20 , arath-T14P4.6 , arath-MES14 , arath-SCP3 , arath-AXR4 , arath-At1g10040 , arath-ZW18 , arath-pae2 , arath-pae1 , arath-a0a1p8awg3

Title : Evidence for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and bacteria from genome sequence of Thermotoga maritima - Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
Author(s) : Nelson KE , Clayton RA , Gill SR , Gwinn ML , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Nelson WC , Ketchum KA , McDonald L , Utterback TR , Malek JA , Linher KD , Garrett MM , Stewart AM , Cotton MD , Pratt MS , Phillips CA , Richardson D , Heidelberg J , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Eisen JA , White O , Salzberg SL , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Nature , 399 :323 , 1999
Abstract : The 1,860,725-base-pair genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8 contains 1,877 predicted coding regions, 1,014 (54%) of which have functional assignments and 863 (46%) of which are of unknown function. Genome analysis reveals numerous pathways involved in degradation of sugars and plant polysaccharides, and 108 genes that have orthologues only in the genomes of other thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea. Of the Eubacteria sequenced to date, T. maritima has the highest percentage (24%) of genes that are most similar to archaeal genes. Eighty-one archaeal-like genes are clustered in 15 regions of the T. maritima genome that range in size from 4 to 20 kilobases. Conservation of gene order between T. maritima and Archaea in many of the clustered regions suggests that lateral gene transfer may have occurred between thermophilic Eubacteria and Archaea.
ESTHER : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedSearch : Nelson_1999_Nature_399_323
PubMedID: 10360571
Gene_locus related to this paper: thema-ESTA , thema-q9x0d6 , thema-q9x042 , thema-TM0033 , thema-TM0053 , thema-TM0077 , thema-TM0336 , thema-TM1160 , thema-TM1350

Title : Sequence and analysis of chromosome 2 of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana - Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
Author(s) : Lin X , Kaul S , Rounsley S , Shea TP , Benito MI , Town CD , Fujii CY , Mason T , Bowman CL , Barnstead M , Feldblyum TV , Buell CR , Ketchum KA , Lee J , Ronning CM , Koo HL , Moffat KS , Cronin LA , Shen M , Pai G , Van Aken S , Umayam L , Tallon LJ , Gill JE , Adams MD , Carrera AJ , Creasy TH , Goodman HM , Somerville CR , Copenhaver GP , Preuss D , Nierman WC , White O , Eisen JA , Salzberg SL , Fraser CM , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 402 :761 , 1999
Abstract : Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is unique among plant model organisms in having a small genome (130-140 Mb), excellent physical and genetic maps, and little repetitive DNA. Here we report the sequence of chromosome 2 from the Columbia ecotype in two gap-free assemblies (contigs) of 3.6 and 16 megabases (Mb). The latter represents the longest published stretch of uninterrupted DNA sequence assembled from any organism to date. Chromosome 2 represents 15% of the genome and encodes 4,037 genes, 49% of which have no predicted function. Roughly 250 tandem gene duplications were found in addition to large-scale duplications of about 0.5 and 4.5 Mb between chromosomes 2 and 1 and between chromosomes 2 and 4, respectively. Sequencing of nearly 2 Mb within the genetically defined centromere revealed a low density of recognizable genes, and a high density and diverse range of vestigial and presumably inactive mobile elements. More unexpected is what appears to be a recent insertion of a continuous stretch of 75% of the mitochondrial genome into chromosome 2.
ESTHER : Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
PubMedSearch : Lin_1999_Nature_402_761
PubMedID: 10617197
Gene_locus related to this paper: arath-At2g45610 , arath-AT2G03550 , arath-AT2G05260 , arath-AT2G12480 , arath-At2g15230 , arath-At2g18360 , arath-At2g19550 , arath-At2g19620 , arath-At2g24280 , arath-AT2G24320 , arath-At2g26740 , arath-At2g26750 , arath-SCP51 , arath-AT2G36290 , arath-At2g42450 , arath-AT2G42690 , arath-AT2G44970 , arath-At2g47630 , arath-AT3g62590 , arath-CGEP , arath-F12L6.6 , arath-F12L6.7 , arath-F12L6.8 , arath-At3g50790 , arath-MES6 , arath-MES7 , arath-MES4 , arath-MES8 , arath-MES2 , arath-MES3 , arath-MES1 , arath-o80731 , arath-pip , arath-PLA11 , arath-PLA13 , arath-PLA16 , arath-PLA19 , arath-q84w08 , arath-SCP8 , arath-SCP9 , arath-SCP10 , arath-SCP11 , arath-SCP12 , arath-SCP13 , arath-SCP23 , arath-SCP26 , arath-SCP28 , arath-SCP46 , arath-T26B15.8 , arath-SCP22 , arath-SFGH , arath-MES19

Title : Genome sequence of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 - White_1999_Science_286_1571
Author(s) : White O , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Dodson RJ , Haft DH , Gwinn ML , Nelson WC , Richardson DL , Moffat KS , Qin H , Jiang L , Pamphile W , Crosby M , Shen M , Vamathevan JJ , Lam P , McDonald L , Utterback T , Zalewski C , Makarova KS , Aravind L , Daly MJ , Minton KW , Fleischmann RD , Ketchum KA , Nelson KE , Salzberg S , Smith HO , Venter JC , Fraser CM
Ref : Science , 286 :1571 , 1999
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is composed of two chromosomes (2,648,638 and 412,348 base pairs), a megaplasmid (177,466 base pairs), and a small plasmid (45,704 base pairs), yielding a total genome of 3,284, 156 base pairs. Multiple components distributed on the chromosomes and megaplasmid that contribute to the ability of D. radiodurans to survive under conditions of starvation, oxidative stress, and high amounts of DNA damage were identified. Deinococcus radiodurans represents an organism in which all systems for DNA repair, DNA damage export, desiccation and starvation recovery, and genetic redundancy are present in one cell.
ESTHER : White_1999_Science_286_1571
PubMedSearch : White_1999_Science_286_1571
PubMedID: 10567266
Gene_locus related to this paper: deira-aryla , deira-DR0165 , deira-DR0334 , deira-DR0553 , deira-DR0593 , deira-DR0654 , deira-DR0657 , deira-DR0779 , deira-DR0791 , deira-DR0945 , deira-DR0964 , deira-DR1053 , deira-DR1326 , deira-DR1351 , deira-DR1352 , deira-DR1403 , deira-DR1537 , deira-DR1915 , deira-DR1931 , deira-DR2078 , deira-DR2248 , deira-DR2478 , deira-DR2503 , deira-DR2506 , deira-DR2522 , deira-DR2549 , deira-DR2551 , deira-DRA0060 , deira-DRA0150 , deira-DRA0307 , deira-DRA0340 , deira-DRB0023 , deira-DRB0097 , deira-este1 , deira-este2 , deira-lip1 , deira-lip2 , deira-lipest , deira-metx

Title : Chromosome 2 sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum - Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
Author(s) : Gardner MJ , Tettelin H , Carucci DJ , Cummings LM , Aravind L , Koonin EV , Shallom S , Mason T , Yu K , Fujii C , Pederson J , Shen K , Jing J , Aston C , Lai Z , Schwartz DC , Pertea M , Salzberg S , Zhou L , Sutton GG , Clayton R , White O , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Hoffman SL
Ref : Science , 282 :1126 , 1998
Abstract : Chromosome 2 of Plasmodium falciparum was sequenced; this sequence contains 947,103 base pairs and encodes 210 predicted genes. In comparison with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, chromosome 2 has a lower gene density, introns are more frequent, and proteins are markedly enriched in nonglobular domains. A family of surface proteins, rifins, that may play a role in antigenic variation was identified. The complete sequencing of chromosome 2 has shown that sequencing of the A+T-rich P. falciparum genome is technically feasible.
ESTHER : Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
PubMedSearch : Gardner_1998_Science_282_1126
PubMedID: 9804551

Title : Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete - Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Norris SJ , Weinstock GM , White O , Sutton GG , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Clayton R , Ketchum KA , Sodergren E , Hardham JM , McLeod MP , Salzberg S , Peterson J , Khalak H , Richardson D , Howell JK , Chidambaram M , Utterback T , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Cotton MD , Fujii C , Garland S , Hatch B , Horst K , Roberts K , Sandusky M , Weidman J , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 281 :375 , 1998
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum was determined and shown to be 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted coding sequences (open reading frames). Systems for DNA replication, transcription, translation, and repair are intact, but catabolic and biosynthetic activities are minimized. The number of identifiable transporters is small, and no phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase carbohydrate transporters were found. Potential virulence factors include a family of 12 potential membrane proteins and several putative hemolysins. Comparison of the T. pallidum genome sequence with that of another pathogenic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, identified unique and common genes and substantiates the considerable diversity observed among pathogenic spirochetes.
ESTHER : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedID: 9665876
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-naptd , trepa-TP0902 , trepa-TP0952

Title : The complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic, sulphate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus - Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
Author(s) : Klenk HP , Clayton RA , Tomb JF , White O , Nelson KE , Ketchum KA , Dodson RJ , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Peterson JD , Richardson DL , Kerlavage AR , Graham DE , Kyrpides NC , Fleischmann RD , Quackenbush J , Lee NH , Sutton GG , Gill S , Kirkness EF , Dougherty BA , McKenney K , Adams MD , Loftus B , Peterson S , Reich CI , McNeil LK , Badger JH , Glodek A , Zhou L , Overbeek R , Gocayne JD , Weidman JF , McDonald L , Utterback T , Cotton MD , Spriggs T , Artiach P , Kaine BP , Sykes SM , Sadow PW , D'Andrea KP , Bowman C , Fujii C , Garland SA , Mason TM , Olsen GJ , Fraser CM , Smith HO , Woese CR , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :364 , 1997
Abstract : Archaeoglobus fulgidus is the first sulphur-metabolizing organism to have its genome sequence determined. Its genome of 2,178,400 base pairs contains 2,436 open reading frames (ORFs). The information processing systems and the biosynthetic pathways for essential components (nucleotides, amino acids and cofactors) have extensive correlation with their counterparts in the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii. The genomes of these two Archaea indicate dramatic differences in the way these organisms sense their environment, perform regulatory and transport functions, and gain energy. In contrast to M. jannaschii, A. fulgidus has fewer restriction-modification systems, and none of its genes appears to contain inteins. A quarter (651 ORFs) of the A. fulgidus genome encodes functionally uncharacterized yet conserved proteins, two-thirds of which are shared with M. jannaschii (428 ORFs). Another quarter of the genome encodes new proteins indicating substantial archaeal gene diversity.
ESTHER : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedSearch : Klenk_1997_Nature_390_364
PubMedID: 9389475
Gene_locus related to this paper: arcfu-AF0514 , arcfu-AF0675 , arcfu-AF1134 , arcfu-AF1563 , arcfu-AF1753 , arcfu-AF1763 , arcfu-est1 , arcfu-est2 , arcfu-est3 , arcfu-estea , arcfu-o28594 , arcfu-o29442 , arcfu-pcbd

Title : The complete genome sequence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. - Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
Author(s) : Tomb J-F , White O , Kerlavage AR , Clayton RA , Sutton GG , Fleischmann RD , Ketchum KA , Klenk H-P , Gill S , Dougherty BA , Nelson K , Quackenbush J , Zhou L , Kirkness EF , Peterson S , Loftus B , Richardson D , Dodson R , Khalak HG , Glodek A , McKenney K , FitzGerald LM , Lee N , Adams MD , Hickey EK , Berg DE , Gocayne JD , Utterback TR , Peterson JD , Kelley JM , Cotton MD , Weidman JM , Fujii C , Bowman C , Watthey L , Wallin E , Hayes WS , Borodovsky M , Karp PD , Smith HO , Fraser CM , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 388 :539 , 1997
Abstract : Helicobacter pylori, strain 26695, has a circular genome of 1,667,867 base pairs and 1,590 predicted coding sequences. Sequence analysis indicates that H. pylori has well-developed systems for motility, for scavenging iron, and for DNA restriction and modification. Many putative adhesins, lipoproteins and other outer membrane proteins were identified, underscoring the potential complexity of host-pathogen interaction. Based on the large number of sequence-related genes encoding outer membrane proteins and the presence of homopolymeric tracts and dinucleotide repeats in coding sequences, H. pylori, like several other mucosal pathogens, probably uses recombination and slipped-strand mispairing within repeats as mechanisms for antigenic variation and adaptive evolution. Consistent with its restricted niche, H. pylori has a few regulatory networks, and a limited metabolic repertoire and biosynthetic capacity. Its survival in acid conditions depends, in part, on its ability to establish a positive inside-membrane potential in low pH.
ESTHER : Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
PubMedSearch : Tomb_1997_Nature_388_539
PubMedID: 9252185
Gene_locus related to this paper: helpy-HP0739 , helpy-o25061

Title : Genomic sequence of a Lyme disease spirochaete, Borrelia burgdorferi - Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Casjens S , Huang WM , Sutton GG , Clayton R , Lathigra R , White O , Ketchum KA , Dodson R , Hickey EK , Gwinn M , Dougherty B , Tomb JF , Fleischmann RD , Richardson D , Peterson J , Kerlavage AR , Quackenbush J , Salzberg S , Hanson M , van Vugt R , Palmer N , Adams MD , Gocayne J , Weidman J , Utterback T , Watthey L , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Garland S , Fujii C , Cotton MD , Horst K , Roberts K , Hatch B , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Nature , 390 :580 , 1997
Abstract : The genome of the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi B31, the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease, contains a linear chromosome of 910,725 base pairs and at least 17 linear and circular plasmids with a combined size of more than 533,000 base pairs. The chromosome contains 853 genes encoding a basic set of proteins for DNA replication, transcription, translation, solute transport and energy metabolism, but, like Mycoplasma genitalium, it contains no genes for cellular biosynthetic reactions. Because B. burgdorferi and M. genitalium are distantly related eubacteria, we suggest that their limited metabolic capacities reflect convergent evolution by gene loss from more metabolically competent progenitors. Of 430 genes on 11 plasmids, most have no known biological function; 39% of plasmid genes are paralogues that form 47 gene families. The biological significance of the multiple plasmid-encoded genes is not clear, although they may be involved in antigenic variation or immune evasion.
ESTHER : Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1997_Nature_390_580
PubMedID: 9403685
Gene_locus related to this paper: borbu-BB0646

Title : The minimal gene complement of Mycoplasma genitalium - Fraser_1995_Science_270_397
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Gocayne JD , White O , Adams MD , Clayton RA , Fleischmann RD , Bult CJ , Kerlavage AR , Sutton G , Kelley JM , Fritchman RD , Weidman JF , Small KV , Sandusky M , Fuhrmann J , Nguyen D , Utterback TR , Saudek DM , Phillips CA , Merrick JM , Tomb JF , Dougherty BA , Bott KF , Hu PC , Lucier TS , Peterson SN , Smith HO , Hutchison CA, 3rd , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 270 :397 , 1995
Abstract : The complete nucleotide sequence (580,070 base pairs) of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome, the smallest known genome of any free-living organism, has been determined by whole-genome random sequencing and assembly. A total of only 470 predicted coding regions were identified that include genes required for DNA replication, transcription and translation, DNA repair, cellular transport, and energy metabolism. Comparison of this genome to that of Haemophilus influenzae suggests that differences in genome content are reflected as profound differences in physiology and metabolic capacity between these two organisms.
ESTHER : Fraser_1995_Science_270_397
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1995_Science_270_397
PubMedID: 7569993
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycge-esl1 , mycge-esl2 , mycge-esl3 , mycge-pip

Title : Whole-genome random sequencing and assembly of Haemophilus influenzae Rd - Fleischmann_1995_Science_269_496
Author(s) : Fleischmann RD , Adams MD , White O , Clayton RA , Kirkness EF , Kerlavage AR , Bult CJ , Tomb JF , Dougherty BA , Merrick JM , McKenney K , Sutton G , FitzHugh W , Fields C , Gocayne JD , Scott J , Shirley R , Liu LI , Glodek A , Kelley JM , Weidman JF , Phillips CA , Spriggs T , Hedblom E , Cotton MD , Utterback TR , Hanna MC , Nguyen DT , Saudek DM , Brandon RC , FineLD , Fritchman JL , Fuhrmann JL , Geoghagen NS , Gnehm CL , McDonald LA , Keith V , Small KV , Fraser CM , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 269 :496 , 1995
Abstract : An approach for genome analysis based on sequencing and assembly of unselected pieces of DNA from the whole chromosome has been applied to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence (1,830,137 base pairs) of the genome from the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae Rd. This approach eliminates the need for initial mapping efforts and is therefore applicable to the vast array of microbial species for which genome maps are unavailable. The H. influenzae Rd genome sequence (Genome Sequence DataBase accession number L42023) represents the only complete genome sequence from a free-living organism.
ESTHER : Fleischmann_1995_Science_269_496
PubMedSearch : Fleischmann_1995_Science_269_496
PubMedID: 7542800
Gene_locus related to this paper: haein-HI0193 , haein-metx , haein-pldb , haein-sfgh , haein-y1552 , haein-yfbb