Fujimori Y

References (2)

Title : Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs - Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
Author(s) : Ota T , Suzuki Y , Nishikawa T , Otsuki T , Sugiyama T , Irie R , Wakamatsu A , Hayashi K , Sato H , Nagai K , Kimura K , Makita H , Sekine M , Obayashi M , Nishi T , Shibahara T , Tanaka T , Ishii S , Yamamoto J , Saito K , Kawai Y , Isono Y , Nakamura Y , Nagahari K , Murakami K , Yasuda T , Iwayanagi T , Wagatsuma M , Shiratori A , Sudo H , Hosoiri T , Kaku Y , Kodaira H , Kondo H , Sugawara M , Takahashi M , Kanda K , Yokoi T , Furuya T , Kikkawa E , Omura Y , Abe K , Kamihara K , Katsuta N , Sato K , Tanikawa M , Yamazaki M , Ninomiya K , Ishibashi T , Yamashita H , Murakawa K , Fujimori K , Tanai H , Kimata M , Watanabe M , Hiraoka S , Chiba Y , Ishida S , Ono Y , Takiguchi S , Watanabe S , Yosida M , Hotuta T , Kusano J , Kanehori K , Takahashi-Fujii A , Hara H , Tanase TO , Nomura Y , Togiya S , Komai F , Hara R , Takeuchi K , Arita M , Imose N , Musashino K , Yuuki H , Oshima A , Sasaki N , Aotsuka S , Yoshikawa Y , Matsunawa H , Ichihara T , Shiohata N , Sano S , Moriya S , Momiyama H , Satoh N , Takami S , Terashima Y , Suzuki O , Nakagawa S , Senoh A , Mizoguchi H , Goto Y , Shimizu F , Wakebe H , Hishigaki H , Watanabe T , Sugiyama A , Takemoto M , Kawakami B , Watanabe K , Kumagai A , Itakura S , Fukuzumi Y , Fujimori Y , Komiyama M , Tashiro H , Tanigami A , Fujiwara T , Ono T , Yamada K , Fujii Y , Ozaki K , Hirao M , Ohmori Y , Kawabata A , Hikiji T , Kobatake N , Inagaki H , Ikema Y , Okamoto S , Okitani R , Kawakami T , Noguchi S , Itoh T , Shigeta K , Senba T , Matsumura K , Nakajima Y , Mizuno T , Morinaga M , Sasaki M , Togashi T , Oyama M , Hata H , Komatsu T , Mizushima-Sugano J , Satoh T , Shirai Y , Takahashi Y , Nakagawa K , Okumura K , Nagase T , Nomura N , Kikuchi H , Masuho Y , Yamashita R , Nakai K , Yada T , Ohara O , Isogai T , Sugano S
Ref : Nat Genet , 36 :40 , 2004
Abstract : As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.
ESTHER : Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
PubMedSearch : Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
PubMedID: 14702039
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD4 , human-ABHD12 , human-ABHD16A , human-ACOT1 , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CES1 , human-CES4A , human-CES5A , human-CPVL , human-DAGLB , human-EPHX2 , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LPL , human-MEST , human-NDRG1 , human-NLGN1 , human-NLGN4X , human-PRCP , human-PRSS16 , human-SERAC1 , human-TMEM53

Title : Comparison of topoisomerase I inhibition, DNA damage, and cytotoxicity of camptothecin derivatives presently in clinical trials - Tanizawa_1994_J.Natl.Cancer.Inst_86_836
Author(s) : Tanizawa A , Fujimori A , Fujimori Y , Pommier Y
Ref : J Natl Cancer Inst , 86 :836 , 1994
Abstract : BACKGROUND: Camptothecins belong to a group of anticancer agents with a unique mechanism of action: poisoning of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I. Two camptothecin derivatives, topotecan (TPT) and CPT-11, are in clinical trials and their chemotherapeutic efficacy appears promising. PURPOSE: Our aim was to compare simultaneously the molecular and cellular pharmacology of the various camptothecin derivatives that are presently in clinical trials.
METHODS: Cytotoxicity of drugs toward human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells was determined by colony-forming assays. DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) were measured by alkaline elution. Drug potency to induce topoisomerase 1-mediated DNA cleavage and the sequence selectivity of the breaks were determined by sequencing gel autoradiography.
RESULTS: SN-38 and CPT were more cytotoxic than 9-AC and TPT, and CPT-11 was almost inactive toward HT-29 cells. IC50 values were 8.8 nM for SN-38, 10 nM for CPT, 19 nM for 9-AC, 33 nM for TPT, and greater than 100 nM for CPT-11. In drug-induced DNA damage measured by alkaline elution drug concentrations producing 1000-rad-equivalents (C1000), values were 0.037 microM for SN-38, 0.051 microM for CPT, 0.085 microM for 9-AC, 0.28 microM for TPT, and greater than 1 microM for CPT-11. SN-38 remained the most potent compound in isolated nuclei, and CPT-11 was still inactive. The potency ranking was the same as in whole cells, and the C1000 values were 0.0025 microM for SN-38, 0.012 microM for CPT, 0.021 microM for 9-AC, 0.44 microM for TPT, and greater than 0.1 microM for CPT-11. Potency difference between SN-38 and the other compounds was greater in isolated nuclei than in whole cells.
CONCLUSIONS: Kinetics of the reversal of drug-induced SSB in isolated nuclei suggest that dissociation of SN-38 from cleavable complexes is much slower than that of CPT. Cleavage patterns of CPT and 9-AC were similar but differed from those of TPT and SN-38. Although in vitro analyses do not necessarily reflect chemotherapeutic efficacy, this study found that SN-38 is the most potent compound and that 9-AC and TPT are less active than CPT in this system. The effect of CPT-11 is minimal. Therefore, the clinical activity of CPT-11 may strongly depend on its hydrolysis to SN-38. Differences in DNA sequence selectivity and the stability of cleavable complexes induced by the drugs may also contribute to differences among CPT derivatives.
ESTHER : Tanizawa_1994_J.Natl.Cancer.Inst_86_836
PubMedSearch : Tanizawa_1994_J.Natl.Cancer.Inst_86_836
PubMedID: 8182764