Ishida S

References (3)

Title : To be or not to be a flatworm: the acoel controversy - Egger_2009_PLoS.One_4_e5502
Author(s) : Egger B , Steinke D , Tarui H , De Mulder K , Arendt D , Borgonie G , Funayama N , Gschwentner R , Hartenstein V , Hobmayer B , Hooge M , Hrouda M , Ishida S , Kobayashi C , Kuales G , Nishimura O , Pfister D , Rieger R , Salvenmoser W , Smith J , Technau U , Tyler S , Agata K , Salzburger W , Ladurner P
Ref : PLoS ONE , 4 :e5502 , 2009
Abstract : Since first described, acoels were considered members of the flatworms (Platyhelminthes). However, no clear synapomorphies among the three large flatworm taxa -- the Catenulida, the Acoelomorpha and the Rhabditophora -- have been characterized to date. Molecular phylogenies, on the other hand, commonly positioned acoels separate from other flatworms. Accordingly, our own multi-locus phylogenetic analysis using 43 genes and 23 animal species places the acoel flatworm Isodiametra pulchra at the base of all Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. By contrast, novel data on the distribution and proliferation of stem cells and the specific mode of epidermal replacement constitute a strong synapomorphy for the Acoela plus the major group of flatworms, the Rhabditophora. The expression of a piwi-like gene not only in gonadal, but also in adult somatic stem cells is another unique feature among bilaterians. These two independent stem-cell-related characters put the Acoela into the Platyhelminthes-Lophotrochozoa clade and account for the most parsimonious evolutionary explanation of epidermal cell renewal in the Bilateria. Most available multigene analyses produce conflicting results regarding the position of the acoels in the tree of life. Given these phylogenomic conflicts and the contradiction of developmental and morphological data with phylogenomic results, the monophyly of the phylum Platyhelminthes and the position of the Acoela remain unresolved. By these data, both the inclusion of Acoela within Platyhelminthes, and their separation from flatworms as basal bilaterians are well-supported alternatives.
ESTHER : Egger_2009_PLoS.One_4_e5502
PubMedSearch : Egger_2009_PLoS.One_4_e5502
PubMedID: 19430533

Title : Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs - Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
Author(s) : Ota T , Suzuki Y , Nishikawa T , Otsuki T , Sugiyama T , Irie R , Wakamatsu A , Hayashi K , Sato H , Nagai K , Kimura K , Makita H , Sekine M , Obayashi M , Nishi T , Shibahara T , Tanaka T , Ishii S , Yamamoto J , Saito K , Kawai Y , Isono Y , Nakamura Y , Nagahari K , Murakami K , Yasuda T , Iwayanagi T , Wagatsuma M , Shiratori A , Sudo H , Hosoiri T , Kaku Y , Kodaira H , Kondo H , Sugawara M , Takahashi M , Kanda K , Yokoi T , Furuya T , Kikkawa E , Omura Y , Abe K , Kamihara K , Katsuta N , Sato K , Tanikawa M , Yamazaki M , Ninomiya K , Ishibashi T , Yamashita H , Murakawa K , Fujimori K , Tanai H , Kimata M , Watanabe M , Hiraoka S , Chiba Y , Ishida S , Ono Y , Takiguchi S , Watanabe S , Yosida M , Hotuta T , Kusano J , Kanehori K , Takahashi-Fujii A , Hara H , Tanase TO , Nomura Y , Togiya S , Komai F , Hara R , Takeuchi K , Arita M , Imose N , Musashino K , Yuuki H , Oshima A , Sasaki N , Aotsuka S , Yoshikawa Y , Matsunawa H , Ichihara T , Shiohata N , Sano S , Moriya S , Momiyama H , Satoh N , Takami S , Terashima Y , Suzuki O , Nakagawa S , Senoh A , Mizoguchi H , Goto Y , Shimizu F , Wakebe H , Hishigaki H , Watanabe T , Sugiyama A , Takemoto M , Kawakami B , Watanabe K , Kumagai A , Itakura S , Fukuzumi Y , Fujimori Y , Komiyama M , Tashiro H , Tanigami A , Fujiwara T , Ono T , Yamada K , Fujii Y , Ozaki K , Hirao M , Ohmori Y , Kawabata A , Hikiji T , Kobatake N , Inagaki H , Ikema Y , Okamoto S , Okitani R , Kawakami T , Noguchi S , Itoh T , Shigeta K , Senba T , Matsumura K , Nakajima Y , Mizuno T , Morinaga M , Sasaki M , Togashi T , Oyama M , Hata H , Komatsu T , Mizushima-Sugano J , Satoh T , Shirai Y , Takahashi Y , Nakagawa K , Okumura K , Nagase T , Nomura N , Kikuchi H , Masuho Y , Yamashita R , Nakai K , Yada T , Ohara O , Isogai T , Sugano S
Ref : Nat Genet , 36 :40 , 2004
Abstract : As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.
ESTHER : Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
PubMedSearch : Ota_2004_Nat.Genet_36_40
PubMedID: 14702039
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-ABHD1 , human-ABHD4 , human-ABHD12 , human-ABHD16A , human-ACOT1 , human-LDAH , human-ABHD18 , human-CES1 , human-CES4A , human-CES5A , human-CPVL , human-DAGLB , human-EPHX2 , human-KANSL3 , human-LIPA , human-LPL , human-MEST , human-NDRG1 , human-NLGN1 , human-NLGN4X , human-PRCP , human-PRSS16 , human-SERAC1 , human-TMEM53

Title : Non-synonymous single nucleotide alterations in the microsomal epoxide hydrolase gene and their functional effects - Maekawa_2003_Xenobiotica_33_277
Author(s) : Maekawa K , Itoda M , Hanioka N , Saito Y , Murayama N , Nakajima O , Soyama A , Ishida S , Ozawa S , Ando M , Sawada J
Ref : Xenobiotica , 33 :277 , 2003
Abstract : 1. By sequencing genomic DNA from 72 established cell lines derived from Japanese individuals, we detected 25 single nucleotide alterations in the microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) gene. Of them, five were exonic alterations resulting in amino acid alterations (77C>G, T26S; 128G>C, R43T; 337T>C, Y113H; 416A>G, H139R; 823A>G, T275A). The T26S, R43T, Y113H and H139R substitutions were found at relatively high frequencies and seemed to be polymorphic, and T26S and T275A were novel. 2. To examine the effects of these amino acid alterations on EPHX1 function, EPHX1 cDNA constructs of wild-type and five variants were transfected into COS-1 cells, and their hydrolytic activities for cis-stilbene oxide were determined in vitro. Although all of the transfectants expressed EPHX1 mRNA and protein at similar levels, the variant H139R protein was expressed at a significantly higher level (128% of the wild-type). K(m) values were not significantly different between the wild-type and variants. 3. Increase (140%) in the enzymatic activity (V(max)) of the variant H139R was accompanied by the increased EPHX1 protein level without any significant change in the intrinsic EPHX1 activity. On the other hand, the variant R43T showed increased values for V(max) and clearance (V(max)/K(m)) (around 130%) both on a microsomal protein basis and on a EPHX1 protein basis. 4. These results suggest that R43T as well as H139R increase epoxide hydrolase activity.
ESTHER : Maekawa_2003_Xenobiotica_33_277
PubMedSearch : Maekawa_2003_Xenobiotica_33_277
PubMedID: 12637245