Hubner N

References (4)

Title : Unbiased Expression Mapping Identifies a Link between the Complement and Cholinergic Systems in the Rat Central Nervous System - Lindblom_2014_J.Immunol_192_1138
Author(s) : Lindblom RP , Strom M , Heinig M , Al Nimer F , Aeinehband S , Berg A , Dominguez CA , Vijayaraghavan S , Zhang XM , Harnesk K , Zelano J , Hubner N , Cullheim S , Darreh-Shori T , Diez M , Piehl F
Ref : J Immunol , 192 :1138 , 2014
Abstract : The complement system is activated in a wide spectrum of CNS diseases and is suggested to play a role in degenerative phenomena such as elimination of synaptic terminals. Still, little is known of mechanisms regulating complement activation in the CNS. Loss of synaptic terminals in the spinal cord after an experimental nerve injury is increased in the inbred DA strain compared with the PVG strain and is associated with expression of the upstream complement components C1q and C3, in the absence of membrane attack complex activation and neutrophil infiltration. To further dissect pathways regulating complement expression, we performed genome-wide expression profiling and linkage analysis in a large F2(DA x PVG) intercross, which identified quantitative trait loci regulating expression of C1qa, C1qb, C3, and C9. Unlike C1qa, C1qb, and C9, which all displayed distinct coregulation with different cis-regulated C-type lectins, C3 was regulated in a coexpression network immediately downstream of butyrylcholinesterase. Butyrylcholinesterase hydrolyses acetylcholine, which exerts immunoregulatory effects partly through TNF-alpha pathways. Accordingly, increased C3, but not C1q, expression was demonstrated in rat and mouse glia following TNF-alpha stimulation, which was abrogated in a dose-dependent manner by acetylcholine. These findings demonstrate new pathways regulating CNS complement expression using unbiased mapping in an experimental in vivo system. A direct link between cholinergic activity and complement activation is supported by in vitro experiments. The identification of distinct pathways subjected to regulation by naturally occurring genetic variability is of relevance for the understanding of disease mechanisms in neurologic conditions characterized by neuronal injury and complement activation.
ESTHER : Lindblom_2014_J.Immunol_192_1138
PubMedSearch : Lindblom_2014_J.Immunol_192_1138
PubMedID: 24353269

Title : Redox regulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase by 15-deoxy-delta-prostaglandin J2 controls coronary hypoxic vasodilation - Charles_2011_Circ.Res_108_324
Author(s) : Charles RL , Burgoyne JR , Mayr M , Weldon SM , Hubner N , Dong H , Morisseau C , Hammock BD , Landar A , Eaton P
Ref : Circulation Research , 108 :324 , 2011
Abstract : RATIONALE: 15-Deoxy-Delta-prostaglandin (15d-PG)J(2) is an electrophilic oxidant that dilates the coronary vasculature. This lipid can adduct to redox active protein thiols to induce oxidative posttranslational modifications that modulate protein and tissue function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of oxidative protein modifications in 15d-PGJ(2)-mediated coronary vasodilation and define the distal signaling pathways leading to enhanced perfusion. METHODS AND RESULTS: Proteomic screening with biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2) identified novel vascular targets to which it adducts, most notably soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited sEH by specifically adducting to a highly conserved thiol (Cys521) adjacent to the catalytic center of the hydrolase. Indeed a Cys521Ser sEH "redox-dead" mutant was resistant to 15d-PGJ(2)-induced hydrolase inhibition. 15d-PGJ(2) dilated coronary vessels and a role for hydrolase inhibition was supported by 2 structurally different sEH antagonists each independently inducing vasorelaxation. Furthermore, 15d-PGJ(2) and sEH antagonists also increased coronary effluent epoxyeicosatrienoic acids consistent with their vasodilatory actions. Indeed 14,15-EET alone induced relaxation and 15d-PGJ(2)-mediated vasodilation was blocked by the EET receptor antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (14,15-EEZE). Additionally, the coronary vasculature of sEH-null mice was basally dilated compared to wild-type controls and failed to vasodilate in response to 15d-PGJ(2). Coronary vasodilation to hypoxia in wild-types was accompanied by 15d-PGJ(2) adduction to and inhibition of sEH. Consistent with the importance of hydrolase inhibition, sEH-null mice failed to vasodilate during hypoxia. CONCLUSION: This represents a new paradigm for the regulation of sEH by an endogenous lipid, which is integral to the fundamental physiological response of coronary hypoxic vasodilation.
ESTHER : Charles_2011_Circ.Res_108_324
PubMedSearch : Charles_2011_Circ.Res_108_324
PubMedID: 21164107

Title : Soluble epoxide hydrolase is a susceptibility factor for heart failure in a rat model of human disease - Monti_2008_Nat.Genet_40_529
Author(s) : Monti J , Fischer J , Paskas S , Heinig M , Schulz H , Gosele C , Heuser A , Fischer R , Schmidt C , Schirdewan A , Gross V , Hummel O , Maatz H , Patone G , Saar K , Vingron M , Weldon SM , Lindpaintner K , Hammock BD , Rohde K , Dietz R , Cook SA , Schunck WH , Luft FC , Hubner N
Ref : Nat Genet , 40 :529 , 2008
Abstract : We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with heart failure by using a rat model of the human disease. We performed invasive cardiac hemodynamic measurements in F2 crosses between spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats and reference strains. We combined linkage analyses with genome-wide expression profiling and identified Ephx2 as a heart failure susceptibility gene in SHHF rats. Specifically, we found that cis variation at Ephx2 segregated with heart failure and with increased transcript expression, protein expression and enzyme activity, leading to a more rapid hydrolysis of cardioprotective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. To confirm our results, we tested the role of Ephx2 in heart failure using knockout mice. Ephx2 gene ablation protected from pressure overload-induced heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias. We further demonstrated differential regulation of EPHX2 in human heart failure, suggesting a cross-species role for Ephx2 in this complex disease.
ESTHER : Monti_2008_Nat.Genet_40_529
PubMedSearch : Monti_2008_Nat.Genet_40_529
PubMedID: 18443590

Title : Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution - Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Scherer S , Scott G , Steffen D , Worley KC , Burch PE , Okwuonu G , Hines S , Lewis L , DeRamo C , Delgado O , Dugan-Rocha S , Miner G , Morgan M , Hawes A , Gill R , Celera , Holt RA , Adams MD , Amanatides PG , Baden-Tillson H , Barnstead M , Chin S , Evans CA , Ferriera S , Fosler C , Glodek A , Gu Z , Jennings D , Kraft CL , Nguyen T , Pfannkoch CM , Sitter C , Sutton GG , Venter JC , Woodage T , Smith D , Lee HM , Gustafson E , Cahill P , Kana A , Doucette-Stamm L , Weinstock K , Fechtel K , Weiss RB , Dunn DM , Green ED , Blakesley RW , Bouffard GG , de Jong PJ , Osoegawa K , Zhu B , Marra M , Schein J , Bosdet I , Fjell C , Jones S , Krzywinski M , Mathewson C , Siddiqui A , Wye N , McPherson J , Zhao S , Fraser CM , Shetty J , Shatsman S , Geer K , Chen Y , Abramzon S , Nierman WC , Havlak PH , Chen R , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Ren Y , Song XZ , Li B , Liu Y , Qin X , Cawley S , Cooney AJ , D'Souza LM , Martin K , Wu JQ , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Jackson AR , Kalafus KJ , McLeod MP , Milosavljevic A , Virk D , Volkov A , Wheeler DA , Zhang Z , Bailey JA , Eichler EE , Tuzun E , Birney E , Mongin E , Ureta-Vidal A , Woodwark C , Zdobnov E , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Alexandersson M , Trask BJ , Young JM , Huang H , Wang H , Xing H , Daniels S , Gietzen D , Schmidt J , Stevens K , Vitt U , Wingrove J , Camara F , Mar Alba M , Abril JF , Guigo R , Smit A , Dubchak I , Rubin EM , Couronne O , Poliakov A , Hubner N , Ganten D , Goesele C , Hummel O , Kreitler T , Lee YA , Monti J , Schulz H , Zimdahl H , Himmelbauer H , Lehrach H , Jacob HJ , Bromberg S , Gullings-Handley J , Jensen-Seaman MI , Kwitek AE , Lazar J , Pasko D , Tonellato PJ , Twigger S , Ponting CP , Duarte JM , Rice S , Goodstadt L , Beatson SA , Emes RD , Winter EE , Webber C , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Adetobi M , Chiaromonte F , Elnitski L , Eswara P , Hardison RC , Hou M , Kolbe D , Makova K , Miller W , Nekrutenko A , Riemer C , Schwartz S , Taylor J , Yang S , Zhang Y , Lindpaintner K , Andrews TD , Caccamo M , Clamp M , Clarke L , Curwen V , Durbin R , Eyras E , Searle SM , Cooper GM , Batzoglou S , Brudno M , Sidow A , Stone EA , Payseur BA , Bourque G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Chakrabarti K , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Bray N , Yap VB , Caspi A , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Haussler D , Roskin KM , Baertsch R , Clawson H , Furey TS , Hinrichs AS , Karolchik D , Kent WJ , Rosenbloom KR , Trumbower H , Weirauch M , Cooper DN , Stenson PD , Ma B , Brent M , Arumugam M , Shteynberg D , Copley RR , Taylor MS , Riethman H , Mudunuri U , Peterson J , Guyer M , Felsenfeld A , Old S , Mockrin S , Collins F
Ref : Nature , 428 :493 , 2004
Abstract : The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedID: 15057822
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-cd029 , rat-d3zaw4 , rat-dpp9 , rat-d3zhq1 , rat-d3zkp8 , rat-d3zuq1 , rat-d3zxw8 , rat-d4a4w4 , rat-d4a7w1 , rat-d4a9l7 , rat-d4a071 , rat-d4aa31 , rat-d4aa33 , rat-d4aa61 , rat-dglb , rat-f1lz91 , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , rat-Tex30 , ratno-1hlip , ratno-1neur , ratno-1plip , ratno-2neur , ratno-3neur , ratno-3plip , ratno-ABH15 , ratno-ACHE , ratno-balip , ratno-BCHE , ratno-cauxin , ratno-Ces1d , ratno-Ces1e , ratno-Ces2f , ratno-d3ze31 , ratno-d3zp14 , ratno-d3zxi3 , ratno-d3zxq0 , ratno-d3zxq1 , ratno-d4a3d4 , ratno-d4aa05 , ratno-dpp4 , ratno-dpp6 , ratno-est8 , ratno-FAP , ratno-hyep , ratno-hyes , ratno-kmcxe , ratno-lmcxe , ratno-LOC246252 , ratno-MGLL , ratno-pbcxe , ratno-phebest , ratno-Ppgb , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q6ayr2 , ratno-q6q629 , ratno-SPG21 , ratno-thyro , rat-m0rc77 , rat-a0a0g2k9y7 , rat-a0a0g2kb83 , rat-d3zba8 , rat-d3zbj1 , rat-d3zcr8 , rat-d3zxw5 , rat-d4a340 , rat-f1lvg7 , rat-m0r509 , rat-m0r5d4 , rat-b5den3 , rat-d3zxk4 , rat-d4a1b6 , rat-d3zmg4 , rat-ab17c