Stevens K

References (16)

Title : First Draft Assembly and Annotation of the Genome of a California Endemic Oak Quercus lobata Ne (Fagaceae) - Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
Author(s) : Sork VL , Fitz-Gibbon ST , Puiu D , Crepeau M , Gugger PF , Sherman R , Stevens K , Langley CH , Pellegrini M , Salzberg SL
Ref : G3 (Bethesda) , 6 :3485 , 2016
Abstract : Oak represents a valuable natural resource across Northern Hemisphere ecosystems, attracting a large research community studying its genetics, ecology, conservation, and management. Here we introduce a draft genome assembly of valley oak (Quercus lobata) using Illumina sequencing of adult leaf tissue of a tree found in an accessible, well-studied, natural southern California population. Our assembly includes a nuclear genome and a complete chloroplast genome, along with annotation of encoded genes. The assembly contains 94,394 scaffolds, totaling 1.17 Gb with 18,512 scaffolds of length 2 kb or longer, with a total length of 1.15 Gb, and a N50 scaffold size of 278,077 kb. The k-mer histograms indicate an diploid genome size of -720-730 Mb, which is smaller than the total length due to high heterozygosity, estimated at 1.25%. A comparison with a recently published European oak (Q. robur) nuclear sequence indicates 93% similarity. The Q. lobata chloroplast genome has 99% identity with another North American oak, Q. rubra Preliminary annotation yielded an estimate of 61,773 predicted protein-coding genes, of which 71% had similarity to known protein domains. We searched 956 Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs, and found 863 complete orthologs, of which 450 were present in > 1 copy. We also examined an earlier version (v0.5) where duplicate haplotypes were removed to discover variants. These additional sources indicate that the predicted gene count in Version 1.0 is overestimated by 37-52%. Nonetheless, this first draft valley oak genome assembly represents a high-quality, well-annotated genome that provides a tool for forest restoration and management practices.
ESTHER : Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
PubMedSearch : Sork_2016_G3.(Bethesda)_6_3485
PubMedID: 27621377
Gene_locus related to this paper: quelo-a0a7n2rbl4 , quelo-a0a7n2mne3 , quelo-a0a7n2mpu3

Title : Evidence for gamma and beta sensory gating deficits as translational endophenotypes for schizophrenia - Smucny_2013_Psychiatry.Res_214_169
Author(s) : Smucny J , Wylie K , Rojas D , Stevens K , Olincy A , Kronberg E , Zheng L , Tregellas J
Ref : Psychiatry Res , 214 :169 , 2013
Abstract : Thorough analysis of translational endophenotypes is needed to improve therapeutic development in schizophrenia. Abnormal sensory gating, one such endophenotype, is associated with reduced expression of the alpha7 nicotinic receptor. However, typical gating measures such as the P50 evoked response are often low-pass filtered, and it is unclear how alpha7 expression affects gating at higher frequencies. Therefore, this study used time-frequency analysis to compare sensory gating at the beta and gamma frequencies between human patients and healthy controls as well as between alpha7 heterozygote mutant mice and wild-type. Gating of total beta (15-26Hz) and gamma (30-50Hz) power during paired clicks was assessed from mouse in vivo hippocampal CA3 recordings. Gating was also assessed in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls using electroencephalography. Relative to wild-type, alpha7 heterozygote mice showed impaired gating of total beta and gamma power. Similarly, relative to controls, patients showed impaired gating of total beta and gamma power. Poor beta gating was associated with negative symptoms. These results demonstrate that schizophrenia patients and alpha7 heterozygote mice show similar deficits in gating high frequency power. Time-frequency analysis of beta and gamma gating may thus be a translational method of assessing the genetic basis of gating deficits in schizophrenia.
ESTHER : Smucny_2013_Psychiatry.Res_214_169
PubMedSearch : Smucny_2013_Psychiatry.Res_214_169
PubMedID: 23972946

Title : Poster: In vitro and in vivo characterization of PheTQS, a novel alpha7 nAChR positive allosteric modulator -
Author(s) : Kew JNC , Mok S , Weil A , Virginio C , Castelletti L , Southam E , Jennings C , Dawson LA , Lacroix LP , Martyn A , Teague S , Atcha Z , Pemberton D , Reavill C , Hill M , Cilia J , Choo K , Stevens K , Lightfoot A
Ref : Biochemical Pharmacology , 78 :913 , 2009
PubMedID:

Title : The multidrug-resistant human pathogen Clostridium difficile has a highly mobile, mosaic genome - Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
Author(s) : Sebaihia M , Wren BW , Mullany P , Fairweather NF , Minton N , Stabler R , Thomson NR , Roberts AP , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Wang H , Holden MT , Wright A , Churcher C , Quail MA , Baker S , Bason N , Brooks K , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Davis P , Dowd L , Fraser A , Feltwell T , Hance Z , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Moule S , Mungall K , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Stevens K , Unwin L , Whithead S , Dupuy B , Dougan G , Barrell B , Parkhill J
Ref : Nat Genet , 38 :779 , 2006
Abstract : We determined the complete genome sequence of Clostridium difficile strain 630, a virulent and multidrug-resistant strain. Our analysis indicates that a large proportion (11%) of the genome consists of mobile genetic elements, mainly in the form of conjugative transposons. These mobile elements are putatively responsible for the acquisition by C. difficile of an extensive array of genes involved in antimicrobial resistance, virulence, host interaction and the production of surface structures. The metabolic capabilities encoded in the genome show multiple adaptations for survival and growth within the gut environment. The extreme genome variability was confirmed by whole-genome microarray analysis; it may reflect the organism's niche in the gut and should provide information on the evolution of virulence in this organism.
ESTHER : Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
PubMedSearch : Sebaihia_2006_Nat.Genet_38_779
PubMedID: 16804543
Gene_locus related to this paper: pepdi-t4eki5 , clod6-q18a60 , clod6-q183v0 , clodi-HYDD , clodr-c9ynf2 , pepd6-pip , pepdi-g6brr4

Title : Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution - Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Scherer S , Scott G , Steffen D , Worley KC , Burch PE , Okwuonu G , Hines S , Lewis L , DeRamo C , Delgado O , Dugan-Rocha S , Miner G , Morgan M , Hawes A , Gill R , Celera , Holt RA , Adams MD , Amanatides PG , Baden-Tillson H , Barnstead M , Chin S , Evans CA , Ferriera S , Fosler C , Glodek A , Gu Z , Jennings D , Kraft CL , Nguyen T , Pfannkoch CM , Sitter C , Sutton GG , Venter JC , Woodage T , Smith D , Lee HM , Gustafson E , Cahill P , Kana A , Doucette-Stamm L , Weinstock K , Fechtel K , Weiss RB , Dunn DM , Green ED , Blakesley RW , Bouffard GG , de Jong PJ , Osoegawa K , Zhu B , Marra M , Schein J , Bosdet I , Fjell C , Jones S , Krzywinski M , Mathewson C , Siddiqui A , Wye N , McPherson J , Zhao S , Fraser CM , Shetty J , Shatsman S , Geer K , Chen Y , Abramzon S , Nierman WC , Havlak PH , Chen R , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Ren Y , Song XZ , Li B , Liu Y , Qin X , Cawley S , Cooney AJ , D'Souza LM , Martin K , Wu JQ , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Jackson AR , Kalafus KJ , McLeod MP , Milosavljevic A , Virk D , Volkov A , Wheeler DA , Zhang Z , Bailey JA , Eichler EE , Tuzun E , Birney E , Mongin E , Ureta-Vidal A , Woodwark C , Zdobnov E , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Alexandersson M , Trask BJ , Young JM , Huang H , Wang H , Xing H , Daniels S , Gietzen D , Schmidt J , Stevens K , Vitt U , Wingrove J , Camara F , Mar Alba M , Abril JF , Guigo R , Smit A , Dubchak I , Rubin EM , Couronne O , Poliakov A , Hubner N , Ganten D , Goesele C , Hummel O , Kreitler T , Lee YA , Monti J , Schulz H , Zimdahl H , Himmelbauer H , Lehrach H , Jacob HJ , Bromberg S , Gullings-Handley J , Jensen-Seaman MI , Kwitek AE , Lazar J , Pasko D , Tonellato PJ , Twigger S , Ponting CP , Duarte JM , Rice S , Goodstadt L , Beatson SA , Emes RD , Winter EE , Webber C , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Adetobi M , Chiaromonte F , Elnitski L , Eswara P , Hardison RC , Hou M , Kolbe D , Makova K , Miller W , Nekrutenko A , Riemer C , Schwartz S , Taylor J , Yang S , Zhang Y , Lindpaintner K , Andrews TD , Caccamo M , Clamp M , Clarke L , Curwen V , Durbin R , Eyras E , Searle SM , Cooper GM , Batzoglou S , Brudno M , Sidow A , Stone EA , Payseur BA , Bourque G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Chakrabarti K , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Bray N , Yap VB , Caspi A , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Haussler D , Roskin KM , Baertsch R , Clawson H , Furey TS , Hinrichs AS , Karolchik D , Kent WJ , Rosenbloom KR , Trumbower H , Weirauch M , Cooper DN , Stenson PD , Ma B , Brent M , Arumugam M , Shteynberg D , Copley RR , Taylor MS , Riethman H , Mudunuri U , Peterson J , Guyer M , Felsenfeld A , Old S , Mockrin S , Collins F
Ref : Nature , 428 :493 , 2004
Abstract : The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedID: 15057822
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-cd029 , rat-d3zaw4 , rat-dpp9 , rat-d3zhq1 , rat-d3zkp8 , rat-d3zuq1 , rat-d3zxw8 , rat-d4a4w4 , rat-d4a7w1 , rat-d4a9l7 , rat-d4a071 , rat-d4aa31 , rat-d4aa33 , rat-d4aa61 , rat-dglb , rat-f1lz91 , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , rat-Tex30 , ratno-1hlip , ratno-1neur , ratno-1plip , ratno-2neur , ratno-3neur , ratno-3plip , ratno-ABH15 , ratno-ACHE , ratno-balip , ratno-BCHE , ratno-cauxin , ratno-Ces1d , ratno-Ces1e , ratno-Ces2f , ratno-d3ze31 , ratno-d3zp14 , ratno-d3zxi3 , ratno-d3zxq0 , ratno-d3zxq1 , ratno-d4a3d4 , ratno-d4aa05 , ratno-dpp4 , ratno-dpp6 , ratno-est8 , ratno-FAP , ratno-hyep , ratno-hyes , ratno-kmcxe , ratno-lmcxe , ratno-LOC246252 , ratno-MGLL , ratno-pbcxe , ratno-phebest , ratno-Ppgb , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q6ayr2 , ratno-q6q629 , ratno-SPG21 , ratno-thyro , rat-m0rc77 , rat-a0a0g2k9y7 , rat-a0a0g2kb83 , rat-d3zba8 , rat-d3zbj1 , rat-d3zcr8 , rat-d3zxw5 , rat-d4a340 , rat-f1lvg7 , rat-m0r509 , rat-m0r5d4 , rat-b5den3 , rat-d3zxk4 , rat-d4a1b6 , rat-d3zmg4 , rat-ab17c

Title : Genomic plasticity of the causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei - Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
Author(s) : Holden MT , Titball RW , Peacock SJ , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Atkins T , Crossman LC , Pitt T , Churcher C , Mungall K , Bentley SD , Sebaihia M , Thomson NR , Bason N , Beacham IR , Brooks K , Brown KA , Brown NF , Challis GL , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Crossett B , Davis P , DeShazer D , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hance Z , Hauser H , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Keith KE , Maddison M , Moule S , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Songsivilai S , Stevens K , Tumapa S , Vesaratchavest M , Whitehead S , Yeats C , Barrell BG , Oyston PC , Parkhill J
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :14240 , 2004
Abstract : Burkholderia pseudomallei is a recognized biothreat agent and the causative agent of melioidosis. This Gram-negative bacterium exists as a soil saprophyte in melioidosis-endemic areas of the world and accounts for 20% of community-acquired septicaemias in northeastern Thailand where half of those affected die. Here we report the complete genome of B. pseudomallei, which is composed of two chromosomes of 4.07 megabase pairs and 3.17 megabase pairs, showing significant functional partitioning of genes between them. The large chromosome encodes many of the core functions associated with central metabolism and cell growth, whereas the small chromosome carries more accessory functions associated with adaptation and survival in different niches. Genomic comparisons with closely and more distantly related bacteria revealed a greater level of gene order conservation and a greater number of orthologous genes on the large chromosome, suggesting that the two replicons have distinct evolutionary origins. A striking feature of the genome was the presence of 16 genomic islands (GIs) that together made up 6.1% of the genome. Further analysis revealed these islands to be variably present in a collection of invasive and soil isolates but entirely absent from the clonally related organism B. mallei. We propose that variable horizontal gene acquisition by B. pseudomallei is an important feature of recent genetic evolution and that this has resulted in a genetically diverse pathogenic species.
ESTHER : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
PubMedSearch : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_14240
PubMedID: 15377794
Gene_locus related to this paper: burma-a5j5w8 , burma-a5tj72 , burma-a5tq93 , burma-metx , burma-q62a61 , burma-q62ar2.1 , burma-q62ar2.2 , burma-q62ax8 , burma-q62b60 , burma-q62b79 , burma-q62bh9 , burma-q62bl4 , burma-q62bl7 , burma-q62c00 , burma-q62cg5 , burma-q62d41 , burma-q62d56 , burma-q62d83 , burma-q62dg2 , burma-q62du7 , burma-q62e67 , burma-q62eb8 , burma-q62ed8 , burma-q62f28 , burma-q62fx7 , burma-q62g26 , burma-q62gx9 , burma-q62gy2 , burma-q62hq2 , burma-q62i62 , burma-q62ib8 , burma-q62ie8 , burma-q62j07 , burma-q62j15 , burma-q62jn5 , burma-q62jy7 , burma-q62kb7 , burma-q62kg0 , burma-q62kh9 , burma-q62lp7 , burma-q62m40 , burma-q62mc3 , burma-q62mf4 , burma-q62mq7 , burma-q629m1 , burma-q629p4 , burma-q629u0 , burp1-q3jvq2 , burps-a4lm41 , burps-q3v7s4 , burps-q63hx2 , burps-q63i95 , burps-q63im5 , burps-q63is4 , burps-q63ja6 , burps-q63ja9 , burps-q63jh5 , burps-q63l17 , burps-q63l41 , burps-q63l44 , burps-q63lt9 , burps-q63me1 , burps-q63mj7 , burps-q63mj8 , burps-q63mn8 , burps-q63mr2 , burps-q63n52 , burps-q63p18 , burps-q63p99 , burps-q63ug2 , burps-q63ug5 , burps-q63xf9 , burps-q63y36 , burps-q63y45 , burps-q63y52 , burps-q63y59 , burta-q2t474 , burps-hboh

Title : Complete genomes of two clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains: evidence for the rapid evolution of virulence and drug resistance - Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_9786
Author(s) : Holden MT , Feil EJ , Lindsay JA , Peacock SJ , Day NP , Enright MC , Foster TJ , Moore CE , Hurst L , Atkin R , Barron A , Bason N , Bentley SD , Chillingworth C , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Clark L , Corton C , Cronin A , Doggett J , Dowd L , Feltwell T , Hance Z , Harris B , Hauser H , Holroyd S , Jagels K , James KD , Lennard N , Line A , Mayes R , Moule S , Mungall K , Ormond D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Sanders M , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Stevens K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG , Spratt BG , Parkhill J
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :9786 , 2004
Abstract : Staphylococcus aureus is an important nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen. Its genetic plasticity has facilitated the evolution of many virulent and drug-resistant strains, presenting a major and constantly changing clinical challenge. We sequenced the approximately 2.8-Mbp genomes of two disease-causing S. aureus strains isolated from distinct clinical settings: a recent hospital-acquired representative of the epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus EMRSA-16 clone (MRSA252), a clinically important and globally prevalent lineage; and a representative of an invasive community-acquired methicillin-susceptible S. aureus clone (MSSA476). A comparative-genomics approach was used to explore the mechanisms of evolution of clinically important S. aureus genomes and to identify regions affecting virulence and drug resistance. The genome sequences of MRSA252 and MSSA476 have a well conserved core region but differ markedly in their accessory genetic elements. MRSA252 is the most genetically diverse S. aureus strain sequenced to date: approximately 6% of the genome is novel compared with other published genomes, and it contains several unique genetic elements. MSSA476 is methicillin-susceptible, but it contains a novel Staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCC) mec-like element (designated SCC(476)), which is integrated at the same site on the chromosome as SCCmec elements in MRSA strains but encodes a putative fusidic acid resistance protein. The crucial role that accessory elements play in the rapid evolution of S. aureus is clearly illustrated by comparing the MSSA476 genome with that of an extremely closely related MRSA community-acquired strain; the differential distribution of large mobile elements carrying virulence and drug-resistance determinants may be responsible for the clinically important phenotypic differences in these strains.
ESTHER : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_9786
PubMedSearch : Holden_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_9786
PubMedID: 15213324
Gene_locus related to this paper: staau-d2feb3 , staau-d2uin3 , staau-LIP , staau-lipas , staau-MW0741 , staau-MW2456 , staau-q6gfm6 , staau-SA0011 , staau-SA0569 , staau-SA0572 , staau-SA0897 , staau-SA1143 , staau-SA2240 , staau-SA2306 , staau-SA2367 , staau-SA2422 , staau-SAV0321 , staau-SAV0446 , staau-SAV0457 , staau-SAV0655 , staau-SAV1014 , staau-SAV1765 , staau-SAV1793 , staau-SAV2188 , staau-SAV2350 , staau-SAV2594

Title : Comparative analysis of the genome sequences of Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica - Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Sebaihia M , Preston A , Murphy LD , Thomson N , Harris DE , Holden MT , Churcher CM , Bentley SD , Mungall KL , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Temple L , James K , Harris B , Quail MA , Achtman M , Atkin R , Baker S , Basham D , Bason N , Cherevach I , Chillingworth T , Collins M , Cronin A , Davis P , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Hamlin N , Hauser H , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Leather S , Moule S , Norberczak H , O'Neil S , Ormond D , Price C , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutter S , Sanders M , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Barrell BG , Maskell DJ
Ref : Nat Genet , 35 :32 , 2003
Abstract : Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are closely related Gram-negative beta-proteobacteria that colonize the respiratory tracts of mammals. B. pertussis is a strict human pathogen of recent evolutionary origin and is the primary etiologic agent of whooping cough. B. parapertussis can also cause whooping cough, and B. bronchiseptica causes chronic respiratory infections in a wide range of animals. We sequenced the genomes of B. bronchiseptica RB50 (5,338,400 bp; 5,007 predicted genes), B. parapertussis 12822 (4,773,551 bp; 4,404 genes) and B. pertussis Tohama I (4,086,186 bp; 3,816 genes). Our analysis indicates that B. parapertussis and B. pertussis are independent derivatives of B. bronchiseptica-like ancestors. During the evolution of these two host-restricted species there was large-scale gene loss and inactivation; host adaptation seems to be a consequence of loss, not gain, of function, and differences in virulence may be related to loss of regulatory or control functions.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2003_Nat.Genet_35_32
PubMedID: 12910271
Gene_locus related to this paper: borbr-BB0273 , borbr-BB0570 , borbr-BB0670 , borbr-BB1064 , borbr-BB1079 , borbr-BB1247 , borbr-BB1498 , borbr-BB2718 , borbr-BB4129 , borbr-BB4247 , borbr-MHPC , borbr-q7wdw1 , borbr-q7wiz8 , borbr-q7wk25 , borbr-q7wmc2 , borbr-q7wpd9 , borpa-q7w3f3 , borpa-q7w9v8 , borpe-BIOH , borpe-BP0300 , borpe-BP2114 , borpe-BP2146 , borpe-BP2511 , borpe-BP3096 , borpe-BP3623 , borpe-BP3691 , borpe-CATD2 , borpe-METX , borpe-O30449 , borpe-PHBC , borpe-q7vsl4 , borpe-q7vt07 , borpe-q7vtg0 , borpe-q7vtv2 , borpe-q7vus4 , borpe-q7vuv4 , borpe-q7vv11 , borpe-q7vv48 , borpe-q7vvf6 , borpe-q7vwu4 , borpe-q7vyn0 , borpe-q7vyq4 , borpe-q7vz26 , borpe-q7vzb4 , borpe-q7vzj6 , borpe-q7w073

Title : Sequence of Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 - Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
Author(s) : Hall N , Pain A , Berriman M , Churcher C , Harris B , Harris D , Mungall K , Bowman S , Atkin R , Baker S , Barron A , Brooks K , Buckee CO , Burrows C , Cherevach I , Chillingworth C , Chillingworth T , Christodoulou Z , Clark L , Clark R , Corton C , Cronin A , Davies R , Davis P , Dear P , Dearden F , Doggett J , Feltwell T , Goble A , Goodhead I , Gwilliam R , Hamlin N , Hance Z , Harper D , Hauser H , Hornsby T , Holroyd S , Horrocks P , Humphray S , Jagels K , James KD , Johnson D , Kerhornou A , Knights A , Konfortov B , Kyes S , Larke N , Lawson D , Lennard N , Line A , Maddison M , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Ormond D , Price C , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rajandream MA , Rutter S , Rutherford KM , Sanders M , Simmonds M , Seeger K , Sharp S , Smith R , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Tivey A , Unwin L , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Sulston JE , Craig A , Newbold C , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 419 :527 , 2002
Abstract : Since the sequencing of the first two chromosomes of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there has been a concerted effort to sequence and assemble the entire genome of this organism. Here we report the sequence of chromosomes 1, 3-9 and 13 of P. falciparum clone 3D7--these chromosomes account for approximately 55% of the total genome. We describe the methods used to map, sequence and annotate these chromosomes. By comparing our assemblies with the optical map, we indicate the completeness of the resulting sequence. During annotation, we assign Gene Ontology terms to the predicted gene products, and observe clustering of some malaria-specific terms to specific chromosomes. We identify a highly conserved sequence element found in the intergenic region of internal var genes that is not associated with their telomeric counterparts.
ESTHER : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedSearch : Hall_2002_Nature_419_527
PubMedID: 12368867
Gene_locus related to this paper: plaf7-c0h4q4 , plafa-MAL6P1.135 , plafa-PFD0185C , plafa-PFI1775W , plafa-PFI1800W

Title : The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe - Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
Author(s) : Wood V , Gwilliam R , Rajandream MA , Lyne M , Lyne R , Stewart A , Sgouros J , Peat N , Hayles J , Baker S , Basham D , Bowman S , Brooks K , Brown D , Brown S , Chillingworth T , Churcher C , Collins M , Connor R , Cronin A , Davis P , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Gentles S , Goble A , Hamlin N , Harris D , Hidalgo J , Hodgson G , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Howarth S , Huckle EJ , Hunt S , Jagels K , James K , Jones L , Jones M , Leather S , McDonald S , McLean J , Mooney P , Moule S , Mungall K , Murphy L , Niblett D , Odell C , Oliver K , O'Neil S , Pearson D , Quail MA , Rabbinowitsch E , Rutherford K , Rutter S , Saunders D , Seeger K , Sharp S , Skelton J , Simmonds M , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Taylor RG , Tivey A , Walsh S , Warren T , Whitehead S , Woodward J , Volckaert G , Aert R , Robben J , Grymonprez B , Weltjens I , Vanstreels E , Rieger M , Schafer M , Muller-Auer S , Gabel C , Fuchs M , Dusterhoft A , Fritzc C , Holzer E , Moestl D , Hilbert H , Borzym K , Langer I , Beck A , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Pohl TM , Eger P , Zimmermann W , Wedler H , Wambutt R , Purnelle B , Goffeau A , Cadieu E , Dreano S , Gloux S , Lelaure V , Mottier S , Galibert F , Aves SJ , Xiang Z , Hunt C , Moore K , Hurst SM , Lucas M , Rochet M , Gaillardin C , Tallada VA , Garzon A , Thode G , Daga RR , Cruzado L , Jimenez J , Sanchez M , del Rey F , Benito J , Dominguez A , Revuelta JL , Moreno S , Armstrong J , Forsburg SL , Cerutti L , Lowe T , McCombie WR , Paulsen I , Potashkin J , Shpakovski GV , Ussery D , Barrell BG , Nurse P
Ref : Nature , 415 :871 , 2002
Abstract : We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.
ESTHER : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedSearch : Wood_2002_Nature_415_871
PubMedID: 11859360
Gene_locus related to this paper: schpo-APTH1 , schpo-be46 , schpo-BST1 , schpo-C2E11.08 , schpo-C14C4.15C , schpo-C22H12.03 , schpo-C23C4.16C , schpo-C57A10.08C , schpo-dyr , schpo-este1 , schpo-KEX1 , schpo-PCY1 , schpo-pdat , schpo-PLG7 , schpo-ppme1 , schpo-q9c0y8 , schpo-SPAC4A8.06C , schpo-C22A12.06C , schpo-SPAC977.15 , schpo-SPAPB1A11.02 , schpo-SPBC14C8.15 , schpo-SPBC530.12C , schpo-SPBC1711.12 , schpo-SPBPB2B2.02 , schpo-SPCC5E4.05C , schpo-SPCC417.12 , schpo-SPCC1672.09 , schpo-yb4e , schpo-yblh , schpo-ydw6 , schpo-ye7a , schpo-ye63 , schpo-ye88 , schpo-yeld , schpo-yk68 , schpo-clr3 , schpo-ykv6

Title : Massive gene decay in the leprosy bacillus - Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
Author(s) : Cole ST , Eiglmeier K , Parkhill J , James KD , Thomson NR , Wheeler PR , Honore N , Garnier T , Churcher C , Harris D , Mungall K , Basham D , Brown D , Chillingworth T , Connor R , Davies RM , Devlin K , Duthoy S , Feltwell T , Fraser A , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Hornsby T , Jagels K , Lacroix C , Maclean J , Moule S , Murphy L , Oliver K , Quail MA , Rajandream MA , Rutherford KM , Rutter S , Seeger K , Simon S , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Squares R , Squares S , Stevens K , Taylor K , Whitehead S , Woodward JR , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 409 :1007 , 2001
Abstract : Leprosy, a chronic human neurological disease, results from infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae, a close relative of the tubercle bacillus. Mycobacterium leprae has the longest doubling time of all known bacteria and has thwarted every effort at culture in the laboratory. Comparing the 3.27-megabase (Mb) genome sequence of an armadillo-derived Indian isolate of the leprosy bacillus with that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.41 Mb) provides clear explanations for these properties and reveals an extreme case of reductive evolution. Less than half of the genome contains functional genes but pseudogenes, with intact counterparts in M. tuberculosis, abound. Genome downsizing and the current mosaic arrangement appear to have resulted from extensive recombination events between dispersed repetitive sequences. Gene deletion and decay have eliminated many important metabolic activities including siderophore production, part of the oxidative and most of the microaerophilic and anaerobic respiratory chains, and numerous catabolic systems and their regulatory circuits.
ESTHER : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedSearch : Cole_2001_Nature_409_1007
PubMedID: 11234002
Gene_locus related to this paper: mycle-a85a , mycle-a85b , mycle-a85c , mycle-lipG , mycle-LPQC , mycle-metx , mycle-ML0314 , mycle-ML0370 , mycle-ML0376 , mycle-ML1339 , mycle-ML1444 , mycle-ML1632 , mycle-ML1633 , mycle-ML1921 , mycle-ML2269 , mycle-ML2297 , mycle-ML2359 , mycle-ML2603 , mycle-mpt5 , mycle-PKS13 , mycle-PTRB , mycle-q9cc62 , mycle-q9cdb3

Title : Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. - Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Wren BW , Thomson NR , Titball RW , Holden MTG , Prentice MB , Sebaihia M , James KD , Churcher C , Mungall KL , Baker S , Basham D , Bentley SD , Brooks K , Cerdeno-Tarraga AM , Chillingworth T , Cronin A , Davies RM , Davis P , Dougan G , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Karlyshev AV , Leather S , Moule S , Oyston PCF , Quail M , Rutherford K , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Stevens K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 413 :523 , 2001
Abstract : The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the systemic invasive infectious disease classically referred to as plague, and has been responsible for three human pandemics: the Justinian plague (sixth to eighth centuries), the Black Death (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries) and modern plague (nineteenth century to the present day). The recent identification of strains resistant to multiple drugs and the potential use of Y. pestis as an agent of biological warfare mean that plague still poses a threat to human health. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Y. pestis strain CO92, consisting of a 4.65-megabase (Mb) chromosome and three plasmids of 96.2 kilobases (kb), 70.3 kb and 9.6 kb. The genome is unusually rich in insertion sequences and displays anomalies in GC base-composition bias, indicating frequent intragenomic recombination. Many genes seem to have been acquired from other bacteria and viruses (including adhesins, secretion systems and insecticidal toxins). The genome contains around 150 pseudogenes, many of which are remnants of a redundant enteropathogenic lifestyle. The evidence of ongoing genome fluidity, expansion and decay suggests Y. pestis is a pathogen that has undergone large-scale genetic flux and provides a unique insight into the ways in which new and highly virulent pathogens evolve.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_523
PubMedID: 11586360
Gene_locus related to this paper: yerpe-BIOH , yerpe-dlhh , yerpe-IRP1 , yerpe-PIP , yerpe-PLDB , yerpe-PTRB , yerpe-q8zey9 , yerpe-y1616 , yerpe-y3224 , yerpe-YBTT , yerpe-YPLA , yerpe-YPO0180 , yerpe-YPO0667 , yerpe-YPO0773 , yerpe-YPO0776 , yerpe-YPO0986 , yerpe-YPO1501 , yerpe-YPO1997 , yerpe-YPO2002 , yerpe-YPO2336 , yerpe-YPO2526 , yerpe-YPO2638 , yerpe-YPO2814 , yerpe-YPO4014

Title : Smoking and mental illness - Leonard_2001_Pharmacol.Biochem.Behav_70_561
Author(s) : Leonard S , Adler LE , Benhammou K , Berger R , Breese CR , Drebing C , Gault J , Lee MJ , Logel J , Olincy A , Ross RG , Stevens K , Sullivan B , Vianzon R , Virnich DE , Waldo M , Walton K , Freedman R
Ref : Pharmacol Biochem Behav , 70 :561 , 2001
Abstract : Patients with mental illness have a higher incidence of smoking than the general population and are the major consumers of tobacco products. This population includes subjects with schizophrenia, manic depression, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), attention-deficit disorder (ADD), and several other less common diseases. Smoking cessation treatment in this group of patients is difficult, often leading to profound depression. Several recent findings suggest that increased smoking in the mentally ill may have an underlying biological etiology. The mental illness schizophrenia has been most thoroughly studied in this regard. Nicotine administration normalizes several sensory-processing deficits seen in this disease. Animal models of sensory deficits have been used to identify specific nicotinic receptor subunits that are involved in these brain pathways, indicating that the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor subunit may play a role. Genetic linkage in schizophrenic families also supports a role for the alpha 7 subunit with linkage at the alpha 7 locus on chromosome 15. Bipolar disorder has some phenotypes in common with schizophrenia and also exhibits genetic linkage to the alpha 7 locus, suggesting that these two disorders may share a gene defect. The alpha 7 receptor is decreased in expression in schizophrenia. [(3)H]-Nicotine binding studies in postmortem brain indicate that high-affinity nicotinic receptors may also be affected in schizophrenia.
ESTHER : Leonard_2001_Pharmacol.Biochem.Behav_70_561
PubMedSearch : Leonard_2001_Pharmacol.Biochem.Behav_70_561
PubMedID: 11796154

Title : Complete genome sequence of a multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18 - Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
Author(s) : Parkhill J , Dougan G , James KD , Thomson NR , Pickard D , Wain J , Churcher C , Mungall KL , Bentley SD , Holden MT , Sebaihia M , Baker S , Basham D , Brooks K , Chillingworth T , Connerton P , Cronin A , Davis P , Davies RM , Dowd L , White N , Farrar J , Feltwell T , Hamlin N , Haque A , Hien TT , Holroyd S , Jagels K , Krogh A , Larsen TS , Leather S , Moule S , O'Gaora P , Parry C , Quail M , Rutherford K , Simmonds M , Skelton J , Stevens K , Whitehead S , Barrell BG
Ref : Nature , 413 :848 , 2001
Abstract : Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) is the aetiological agent of typhoid fever, a serious invasive bacterial disease of humans with an annual global burden of approximately 16 million cases, leading to 600,000 fatalities. Many S. enterica serovars actively invade the mucosal surface of the intestine but are normally contained in healthy individuals by the local immune defence mechanisms. However, S. typhi has evolved the ability to spread to the deeper tissues of humans, including liver, spleen and bone marrow. Here we have sequenced the 4,809,037-base pair (bp) genome of a S. typhi (CT18) that is resistant to multiple drugs, revealing the presence of hundreds of insertions and deletions compared with the Escherichia coli genome, ranging in size from single genes to large islands. Notably, the genome sequence identifies over two hundred pseudogenes, several corresponding to genes that are known to contribute to virulence in Salmonella typhimurium. This genetic degradation may contribute to the human-restricted host range for S. typhi. CT18 harbours a 218,150-bp multiple-drug-resistance incH1 plasmid (pHCM1), and a 106,516-bp cryptic plasmid (pHCM2), which shows recent common ancestry with a virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis.
ESTHER : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
PubMedSearch : Parkhill_2001_Nature_413_848
PubMedID: 11677608
Gene_locus related to this paper: salen-OPDB , salti-q8z717 , salty-AES , salty-BIOH , salty-ENTF , salty-FES , salty-IROD , salty-IROE , salty-PLDB , salty-STM2547 , salty-STM4506 , salty-STY1441 , salty-STY2428 , salty-STY3846 , salty-yafa , salty-YBFF , salty-ycfp , salty-YFBB , salty-YJFP , salty-YQIA

Title : Smoking and schizophrenia: abnormal nicotinic receptor expression - Leonard_2000_Eur.J.Pharmacol_393_237
Author(s) : Leonard S , Breese C , Adams C , Benhammou K , Gault J , Stevens K , Lee M , Adler L , Olincy A , Ross R , Freedman R
Ref : European Journal of Pharmacology , 393 :237 , 2000
Abstract : Biological and genetic evidence suggests a role for the neuronal nicotinic receptors in the neuropathophysiology of schizophrenia. Nicotine normalizes an auditory evoked potential deficit seen in subjects who suffer from the disease. Nicotinic receptors with both high and low affinity for nicotine are decreased in postmortem brain of schizophrenics compared to control subjects. The chromosomal locus of the human alpha-7 gene (15q14) is linked to the gating deficit with a lod of 5.3, and antagonists of the alpha-7 receptor (alpha-bungarotoxin and methyllycaconitine) induce a loss of gating in rodents. We have cloned the human alpha-7 gene and found it to be partially duplicated proximal to the full-length gene. The duplication is expressed in both the brain and in peripheral blood cells of normal subjects, but is missing in some schizophrenic subjects. The results of these studies suggest the presence of abnormal expression and function of the neuronal nicotinic receptor gene family in schizophrenia.
ESTHER : Leonard_2000_Eur.J.Pharmacol_393_237
PubMedSearch : Leonard_2000_Eur.J.Pharmacol_393_237
PubMedID: 10771019

Title : Schizophrenia, sensory gating, and nicotinic receptors - Adler_1998_Schizophr.Bull_24_189
Author(s) : Adler LE , Olincy A , Waldo M , Harris JG , Griffith J , Stevens K , Flach K , Nagamoto H , Bickford P , Leonard S , Freedman R
Ref : Schizophr Bull , 24 :189 , 1998
Abstract : A series of human and animal investigations has suggested that altered expression and function of the alpha7-nicotinic cholinergic receptor may be responsible for the auditory sensory gating deficit characterized in schizophrenia patients and their relatives as diminished suppression of an auditory-evoked response (P50) to repeated stimuli. This finding, in conjunction with evidence for familial transmission of this sensory gating deficit, suggests a pathogenic role of the gene for the alpha7-nicotinic receptor in schizophrenia. This article considers the possible effects of this dysfunction in a broader context. Not only is this dysfunction consistent with difficulties in sensory gating, but it might also predispose patients to problems with learning efficiency and accuracy. Such learning problems could underlie schizophrenia patients' delusional thinking, hallucinations, and social dysfunction. In addition, heavy smoking in many schizophrenia patients is consistent with the high concentration of nicotine necessary to activate the receptor and with the receptor's extremely rapid desensitization. Finally, the receptor's possible role in cell growth and differentiation should be considered in connection with developmental deficits and other cellular abnormalities in schizophrenia.
ESTHER : Adler_1998_Schizophr.Bull_24_189
PubMedSearch : Adler_1998_Schizophr.Bull_24_189
PubMedID: 9613620