McLeod MP

References (7)

Title : The complete genome of Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 provides insights into a catabolic powerhouse - McLeod_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_15582
Author(s) : McLeod MP , Warren RL , Hsiao WW , Araki N , Myhre M , Fernandes C , Miyazawa D , Wong W , Lillquist AL , Wang D , Dosanjh M , Hara H , Petrescu A , Morin RD , Yang G , Stott JM , Schein JE , Shin H , Smailus D , Siddiqui AS , Marra MA , Jones SJ , Holt R , Brinkman FS , Miyauchi K , Fukuda M , Davies JE , Mohn WW , Eltis LD
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 103 :15582 , 2006
Abstract : Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 (RHA1) is a potent polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading soil actinomycete that catabolizes a wide range of compounds and represents a genus of considerable industrial interest. RHA1 has one of the largest bacterial genomes sequenced to date, comprising 9,702,737 bp (67% G+C) arranged in a linear chromosome and three linear plasmids. A targeted insertion methodology was developed to determine the telomeric sequences. RHA1's 9,145 predicted protein-encoding genes are exceptionally rich in oxygenases (203) and ligases (192). Many of the oxygenases occur in the numerous pathways predicted to degrade aromatic compounds (30) or steroids (4). RHA1 also contains 24 nonribosomal peptide synthase genes, six of which exceed 25 kbp, and seven polyketide synthase genes, providing evidence that rhodococci harbor an extensive secondary metabolism. Among sequenced genomes, RHA1 is most similar to those of nocardial and mycobacterial strains. The genome contains few recent gene duplications. Moreover, three different analyses indicate that RHA1 has acquired fewer genes by recent horizontal transfer than most bacteria characterized to date and far fewer than Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, whose genome size and catabolic versatility rival those of RHA1. RHA1 and LB400 thus appear to demonstrate that ecologically similar bacteria can evolve large genomes by different means. Overall, RHA1 appears to have evolved to simultaneously catabolize a diverse range of plant-derived compounds in an O(2)-rich environment. In addition to establishing RHA1 as an important model for studying actinomycete physiology, this study provides critical insights that facilitate the exploitation of these industrially important microorganisms.
ESTHER : McLeod_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_15582
PubMedSearch : McLeod_2006_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_103_15582
PubMedID: 17030794
Gene_locus related to this paper: rhoob-c1ar27 , rhoob-c1arb5 , rhoob-c1asz4 , rhoob-c1at13 , rhoob-c1ata3 , rhoob-c1atk8 , rhoob-c1atq0 , rhoob-c1ats8 , rhoob-c1att5 , rhoob-c1au11 , rhoob-c1auh5 , rhoob-c1aux1 , rhoob-c1av24 , rhoob-c1awr1 , rhoob-c1axf2 , rhoob-c1ayb0 , rhoob-c1b0a8 , rhoob-c1b0g7 , rhoob-c1b0w8 , rhoob-c1b1i6 , rhoob-c1b7t4 , rhoob-c1b8z9 , rhoob-c1b9l2 , rhoob-c1b9v1 , rhoob-c1b9y1 , rhoob-c1b930 , rhoob-c1b931 , rhoob-c1b932 , rhoob-c1b996 , rhoob-c1bbl3 , rhoob-c1bbq4 , rhoop-pcaL , rhosp-bphD2 , rhosp-EtbD1 , rhosr-q0rwt2 , rhosr-q0rwv3 , rhosr-q0rxc8 , rhosr-q0ryc0 , rhosr-q0ryn3 , rhosr-q0rz46 , rhosr-q0rz78 , rhosr-q0s0s0 , rhosr-q0s1l0 , rhosr-q0s1m1 , rhosr-q0s1n4 , rhosr-q0s1x5 , rhosr-q0s1x6 , rhosr-q0s2i6 , rhosr-q0s2n9 , rhosr-q0s2t5 , rhosr-q0s3c8 , rhosr-q0s3s6 , rhosr-q0s4f1 , rhosr-q0s5h5 , rhosr-q0s5m7 , rhosr-q0s6a9 , rhosr-q0s6b3 , rhosr-q0s6b5 , rhosr-q0s7i7 , rhosr-q0s7r1 , rhosr-q0s008 , rhosr-q0s8b3 , rhosr-q0s8f4 , rhosr-q0s8p7 , rhosr-q0s8z9 , rhosr-q0s9l3 , rhosr-q0s9m1 , rhosr-q0s101 , rhosr-q0s125 , rhosr-q0s230 , rhosr-q0s252 , rhosr-q0s393 , rhosr-q0s477 , rhosr-q0s545 , rhojr-q0s546 , rhosr-q0s837 , rhosr-q0s849 , rhosr-q0sa25 , rhosr-q0sa26 , rhosr-q0sa61 , rhosr-q0saa5 , rhosr-q0san0 , rhosr-q0saw3 , rhosr-q0sbd3 , rhosr-q0sc04 , rhosr-q0scq2 , rhosr-q0sd10 , rhosr-q0sdb8 , rhosr-q0sdh6 , rhosr-q0sdr2 , rhosr-q0sdr5 , rhosr-q0sdt1 , rhosr-q0sdu5 , rhosr-q0sej4 , rhosr-q0ses6 , rhosr-q0set7 , rhosr-q0sex8 , rhosr-q0sf05 , rhosr-q0sfh8 , rhosr-q0sfl2 , rhosr-q0sfz6 , rhosr-q0sgc8 , rhosr-q0sgj4 , rhosr-q0sgv4 , rhosr-q0sgw4 , rhosr-q0sh74 , rhosr-q0shd6 , rhosr-q0shi2 , rhosr-q0sjy0 , rhosr-q0skn1 , rhoob-c1b934 , rhosr-q0sab7 , rhosr-q0rwx4 , rhoob-c1asm3 , rhosr-q0ruu2 , rhosr-q0s747 , rhosr-q0ry47 , rhosr-q0rwa1 , rhosr-q0sj22 , 9noca-j2j8s8 , rhojr-q0sd80 , rhojr-q0sf05

Title : The genome sequence of Mannheimia haemolytica A1: insights into virulence, natural competence, and Pasteurellaceae phylogeny - Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
Author(s) : Gioia J , Qin X , Jiang H , Clinkenbeard K , Lo R , Liu Y , Fox GE , Yerrapragada S , McLeod MP , McNeill TZ , Hemphill L , Sodergren E , Wang Q , Muzny DM , Homsi FJ , Weinstock GM , Highlander SK
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 188 :7257 , 2006
Abstract : The draft genome sequence of Mannheimia haemolytica A1, the causative agent of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), is presented. Strain ATCC BAA-410, isolated from the lung of a calf with BRDC, was the DNA source. The annotated genome includes 2,839 coding sequences, 1,966 of which were assigned a function and 436 of which are unique to M. haemolytica. Through genome annotation many features of interest were identified, including bacteriophages and genes related to virulence, natural competence, and transcriptional regulation. In addition to previously described virulence factors, M. haemolytica encodes adhesins, including the filamentous hemagglutinin FhaB and two trimeric autotransporter adhesins. Two dual-function immunoglobulin-protease/adhesins are also present, as is a third immunoglobulin protease. Genes related to iron acquisition and drug resistance were identified and are likely important for survival in the host and virulence. Analysis of the genome indicates that M. haemolytica is naturally competent, as genes for natural competence and DNA uptake signal sequences (USS) are present. Comparison of competence loci and USS in other species in the family Pasteurellaceae indicates that M. haemolytica, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Haemophilus ducreyi form a lineage distinct from other Pasteurellaceae. This observation was supported by a phylogenetic analysis using sequences of predicted housekeeping genes.
ESTHER : Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
PubMedSearch : Gioia_2006_J.Bacteriol_188_7257
PubMedID: 17015664
Gene_locus related to this paper: pasha-a7jrr2 , pasha-a7js08 , pasha-a7jsd4 , pasha-a7jsj9 , pasha-a7ju47 , pasmu-q9cjt9

Title : Complete genome sequence of Rickettsia typhi and comparison with sequences of other rickettsiae - McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
Author(s) : McLeod MP , Qin X , Karpathy SE , Gioia J , Highlander SK , Fox GE , McNeill TZ , Jiang H , Muzny D , Jacob LS , Hawes AC , Sodergren E , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan M , Fan G , Amin AG , Gibbs RA , Hong C , Yu XJ , Walker DH , Weinstock GM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 186 :5842 , 2004
Abstract : Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of murine typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium with a life cycle involving both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Here we present the complete genome sequence of R. typhi (1,111,496 bp) and compare it to the two published rickettsial genome sequences: R. prowazekii and R. conorii. We identified 877 genes in R. typhi encoding 3 rRNAs, 33 tRNAs, 3 noncoding RNAs, and 838 proteins, 3 of which are frameshifts. In addition, we discovered more than 40 pseudogenes, including the entire cytochrome c oxidase system. The three rickettsial genomes share 775 genes: 23 are found only in R. prowazekii and R. typhi, 15 are found only in R. conorii and R. typhi, and 24 are unique to R. typhi. Although most of the genes are colinear, there is a 35-kb inversion in gene order, which is close to the replication terminus, in R. typhi, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. In addition, we found a 124-kb R. typhi-specific inversion, starting 19 kb from the origin of replication, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. Inversions in this region are also seen in the unpublished genome sequences of R. sibirica and R. rickettsii, indicating that this region is a hot spot for rearrangements. Genome comparisons also revealed a 12-kb insertion in the R. prowazekii genome, relative to R. typhi and R. conorii, which appears to have occurred after the typhus (R. prowazekii and R. typhi) and spotted fever (R. conorii) groups diverged. The three-way comparison allowed further in silico analysis of the SpoT split genes, leading us to propose that the stringent response system is still functional in these rickettsiae.
ESTHER : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedSearch : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedID: 15317790
Gene_locus related to this paper: ricco-PTRB , ricty-q68vs9 , ricty-q68w06 , ricty-q68w12 , ricty-q68w56 , ricty-q68wq9 , ricty-q68wt4 , ricty-q68x29 , ricty-q68xj3

Title : Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution - Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Scherer S , Scott G , Steffen D , Worley KC , Burch PE , Okwuonu G , Hines S , Lewis L , DeRamo C , Delgado O , Dugan-Rocha S , Miner G , Morgan M , Hawes A , Gill R , Celera , Holt RA , Adams MD , Amanatides PG , Baden-Tillson H , Barnstead M , Chin S , Evans CA , Ferriera S , Fosler C , Glodek A , Gu Z , Jennings D , Kraft CL , Nguyen T , Pfannkoch CM , Sitter C , Sutton GG , Venter JC , Woodage T , Smith D , Lee HM , Gustafson E , Cahill P , Kana A , Doucette-Stamm L , Weinstock K , Fechtel K , Weiss RB , Dunn DM , Green ED , Blakesley RW , Bouffard GG , de Jong PJ , Osoegawa K , Zhu B , Marra M , Schein J , Bosdet I , Fjell C , Jones S , Krzywinski M , Mathewson C , Siddiqui A , Wye N , McPherson J , Zhao S , Fraser CM , Shetty J , Shatsman S , Geer K , Chen Y , Abramzon S , Nierman WC , Havlak PH , Chen R , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Ren Y , Song XZ , Li B , Liu Y , Qin X , Cawley S , Cooney AJ , D'Souza LM , Martin K , Wu JQ , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Jackson AR , Kalafus KJ , McLeod MP , Milosavljevic A , Virk D , Volkov A , Wheeler DA , Zhang Z , Bailey JA , Eichler EE , Tuzun E , Birney E , Mongin E , Ureta-Vidal A , Woodwark C , Zdobnov E , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Alexandersson M , Trask BJ , Young JM , Huang H , Wang H , Xing H , Daniels S , Gietzen D , Schmidt J , Stevens K , Vitt U , Wingrove J , Camara F , Mar Alba M , Abril JF , Guigo R , Smit A , Dubchak I , Rubin EM , Couronne O , Poliakov A , Hubner N , Ganten D , Goesele C , Hummel O , Kreitler T , Lee YA , Monti J , Schulz H , Zimdahl H , Himmelbauer H , Lehrach H , Jacob HJ , Bromberg S , Gullings-Handley J , Jensen-Seaman MI , Kwitek AE , Lazar J , Pasko D , Tonellato PJ , Twigger S , Ponting CP , Duarte JM , Rice S , Goodstadt L , Beatson SA , Emes RD , Winter EE , Webber C , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Adetobi M , Chiaromonte F , Elnitski L , Eswara P , Hardison RC , Hou M , Kolbe D , Makova K , Miller W , Nekrutenko A , Riemer C , Schwartz S , Taylor J , Yang S , Zhang Y , Lindpaintner K , Andrews TD , Caccamo M , Clamp M , Clarke L , Curwen V , Durbin R , Eyras E , Searle SM , Cooper GM , Batzoglou S , Brudno M , Sidow A , Stone EA , Payseur BA , Bourque G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Chakrabarti K , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Bray N , Yap VB , Caspi A , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Haussler D , Roskin KM , Baertsch R , Clawson H , Furey TS , Hinrichs AS , Karolchik D , Kent WJ , Rosenbloom KR , Trumbower H , Weirauch M , Cooper DN , Stenson PD , Ma B , Brent M , Arumugam M , Shteynberg D , Copley RR , Taylor MS , Riethman H , Mudunuri U , Peterson J , Guyer M , Felsenfeld A , Old S , Mockrin S , Collins F
Ref : Nature , 428 :493 , 2004
Abstract : The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedID: 15057822
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-cd029 , rat-d3zaw4 , rat-dpp9 , rat-d3zhq1 , rat-d3zkp8 , rat-d3zuq1 , rat-d3zxw8 , rat-d4a4w4 , rat-d4a7w1 , rat-d4a9l7 , rat-d4a071 , rat-d4aa31 , rat-d4aa33 , rat-d4aa61 , rat-dglb , rat-f1lz91 , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , rat-Tex30 , ratno-1hlip , ratno-1neur , ratno-1plip , ratno-2neur , ratno-3neur , ratno-3plip , ratno-ABH15 , ratno-ACHE , ratno-balip , ratno-BCHE , ratno-cauxin , ratno-Ces1d , ratno-Ces1e , ratno-Ces2f , ratno-d3ze31 , ratno-d3zp14 , ratno-d3zxi3 , ratno-d3zxq0 , ratno-d3zxq1 , ratno-d4a3d4 , ratno-d4aa05 , ratno-dpp4 , ratno-dpp6 , ratno-est8 , ratno-FAP , ratno-hyep , ratno-hyes , ratno-kmcxe , ratno-lmcxe , ratno-LOC246252 , ratno-MGLL , ratno-pbcxe , ratno-phebest , ratno-Ppgb , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q6ayr2 , ratno-q6q629 , ratno-SPG21 , ratno-thyro , rat-m0rc77 , rat-a0a0g2k9y7 , rat-a0a0g2kb83 , rat-d3zba8 , rat-d3zbj1 , rat-d3zcr8 , rat-d3zxw5 , rat-d4a340 , rat-f1lvg7 , rat-m0r509 , rat-m0r5d4 , rat-b5den3 , rat-d3zxk4 , rat-d4a1b6 , rat-d3zmg4 , rat-ab17c

Title : Comparison of the genome of the oral pathogen Treponema denticola with other spirochete genomes - Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
Author(s) : Seshadri R , Myers GS , Tettelin H , Eisen JA , Heidelberg JF , Dodson RJ , Davidsen TM , DeBoy RT , Fouts DE , Haft DH , Selengut J , Ren Q , Brinkac LM , Madupu R , Kolonay J , Durkin SA , Daugherty SC , Shetty J , Shvartsbeyn A , Gebregeorgis E , Geer K , Tsegaye G , Malek J , Ayodeji B , Shatsman S , McLeod MP , Smajs D , Howell JK , Pal S , Amin A , Vashisth P , McNeill TZ , Xiang Q , Sodergren E , Baca E , Weinstock GM , Norris SJ , Fraser CM , Paulsen IT
Ref : Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A , 101 :5646 , 2004
Abstract : We present the complete 2,843,201-bp genome sequence of Treponema denticola (ATCC 35405) an oral spirochete associated with periodontal disease. Analysis of the T. denticola genome reveals factors mediating coaggregation, cell signaling, stress protection, and other competitive and cooperative measures, consistent with its pathogenic nature and lifestyle within the mixed-species environment of subgingival dental plaque. Comparisons with previously sequenced spirochete genomes revealed specific factors contributing to differences and similarities in spirochete physiology as well as pathogenic potential. The T. denticola genome is considerably larger in size than the genome of the related syphilis-causing spirochete Treponema pallidum. The differences in gene content appear to be attributable to a combination of three phenomena: genome reduction, lineage-specific expansions, and horizontal gene transfer. Genes lost due to reductive evolution appear to be largely involved in metabolism and transport, whereas some of the genes that have arisen due to lineage-specific expansions are implicated in various pathogenic interactions, and genes acquired via horizontal gene transfer are largely phage-related or of unknown function.
ESTHER : Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
PubMedSearch : Seshadri_2004_Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.U.S.A_101_5646
PubMedID: 15064399
Gene_locus related to this paper: trede-q73j01 , trede-q73kf5 , trede-q73kp3 , trede-q73ks1 , trede-q73nf8 , trede-q73qt5 , trede-q73qv0 , trede-q73ra4 , trede-q73ri8 , trede-Q93EK3 , trede-TDE0521

Title : The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster - Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
Author(s) : Adams MD , Celniker SE , Holt RA , Evans CA , Gocayne JD , Amanatides PG , Scherer SE , Li PW , Hoskins RA , Galle RF , George RA , Lewis SE , Richards S , Ashburner M , Henderson SN , Sutton GG , Wortman JR , Yandell MD , Zhang Q , Chen LX , Brandon RC , Rogers YH , Blazej RG , Champe M , Pfeiffer BD , Wan KH , Doyle C , Baxter EG , Helt G , Nelson CR , Gabor GL , Abril JF , Agbayani A , An HJ , Andrews-Pfannkoch C , Baldwin D , Ballew RM , Basu A , Baxendale J , Bayraktaroglu L , Beasley EM , Beeson KY , Benos PV , Berman BP , Bhandari D , Bolshakov S , Borkova D , Botchan MR , Bouck J , Brokstein P , Brottier P , Burtis KC , Busam DA , Butler H , Cadieu E , Center A , Chandra I , Cherry JM , Cawley S , Dahlke C , Davenport LB , Davies P , de Pablos B , Delcher A , Deng Z , Mays AD , Dew I , Dietz SM , Dodson K , Doup LE , Downes M , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunkov BC , Dunn P , Durbin KJ , Evangelista CC , Ferraz C , Ferriera S , Fleischmann W , Fosler C , Gabrielian AE , Garg NS , Gelbart WM , Glasser K , Glodek A , Gong F , Gorrell JH , Gu Z , Guan P , Harris M , Harris NL , Harvey D , Heiman TJ , Hernandez JR , Houck J , Hostin D , Houston KA , Howland TJ , Wei MH , Ibegwam C , Jalali M , Kalush F , Karpen GH , Ke Z , Kennison JA , Ketchum KA , Kimmel BE , Kodira CD , Kraft C , Kravitz S , Kulp D , Lai Z , Lasko P , Lei Y , Levitsky AA , Li J , Li Z , Liang Y , Lin X , Liu X , Mattei B , McIntosh TC , McLeod MP , McPherson D , Merkulov G , Milshina NV , Mobarry C , Morris J , Moshrefi A , Mount SM , Moy M , Murphy B , Murphy L , Muzny DM , Nelson DL , Nelson DR , Nelson KA , Nixon K , Nusskern DR , Pacleb JM , Palazzolo M , Pittman GS , Pan S , Pollard J , Puri V , Reese MG , Reinert K , Remington K , Saunders RD , Scheeler F , Shen H , Shue BC , Siden-Kiamos I , Simpson M , Skupski MP , Smith T , Spier E , Spradling AC , Stapleton M , Strong R , Sun E , Svirskas R , Tector C , Turner R , Venter E , Wang AH , Wang X , Wang ZY , Wassarman DA , Weinstock GM , Weissenbach J , Williams SM , WoodageT , Worley KC , Wu D , Yang S , Yao QA , Ye J , Yeh RF , Zaveri JS , Zhan M , Zhang G , Zhao Q , Zheng L , Zheng XH , Zhong FN , Zhong W , Zhou X , Zhu S , Zhu X , Smith HO , Gibbs RA , Myers EW , Rubin GM , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 287 :2185 , 2000
Abstract : The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the approximately 120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes approximately 13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.
ESTHER : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedSearch : Adams_2000_Science_287_2185
PubMedID: 10731132
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-1vite , drome-2vite , drome-3vite , drome-a1z6g9 , drome-abhd2 , drome-ACHE , drome-b6idz4 , drome-BEM46 , drome-CG5707 , drome-CG5704 , drome-CG1309 , drome-CG1882 , drome-CG1986 , drome-CG2059 , drome-CG2493 , drome-CG2528 , drome-CG2772 , drome-CG3160 , drome-CG3344 , drome-CG3523 , drome-CG3524 , drome-CG3734 , drome-CG3739 , drome-CG3744 , drome-CG3841 , drome-CG4267 , drome-CG4382 , drome-CG4390 , drome-CG4572 , drome-CG4582 , drome-CG4851 , drome-CG4979 , drome-CG5068 , drome-CG5162 , drome-CG5355 , drome-CG5377 , drome-CG5397 , drome-CG5412 , drome-CG5665 , drome-CG5932 , drome-CG5966 , drome-CG6018 , drome-CG6113 , drome-CG6271 , drome-CG6283 , drome-CG6295 , drome-CG6296 , drome-CG6414 , drome-CG6431 , drome-CG6472 , drome-CG6567 , drome-CG6675 , drome-CG6753 , drome-CG6847 , drome-CG7329 , drome-CG7367 , drome-CG7529 , drome-CG7632 , drome-CG8058 , drome-CG8093 , drome-CG8233 , drome-CG8424 , drome-CG8425 , drome-CG9059 , drome-CG9186 , drome-CG9287 , drome-CG9289 , drome-CG9542 , drome-CG9858 , drome-CG9953 , drome-CG9966 , drome-CG10116 , drome-CG10163 , drome-CG10175 , drome-CG10339 , drome-CG10357 , drome-CG10982 , drome-CG11034 , drome-CG11055 , drome-CG11309 , drome-CG11319 , drome-CG11406 , drome-CG11598 , drome-CG11600 , drome-CG11608 , drome-CG11626 , drome-CG11935 , drome-CG12108 , drome-CG12869 , drome-CG13282 , drome-CG13562 , drome-CG13772 , drome-CG14034 , drome-nlg3 , drome-CG14717 , drome-CG15101 , drome-CG15102 , drome-CG15106 , drome-CG15111 , drome-CG15820 , drome-CG15821 , drome-CG15879 , drome-CG17097 , drome-CG17099 , drome-CG17101 , drome-CG17191 , drome-CG17192 , drome-CG17292 , drome-CG18258 , drome-CG18284 , drome-CG18301 , drome-CG18302 , drome-CG18493 , drome-CG18530 , drome-CG18641 , drome-CG18815 , drome-CG31089 , drome-CG31091 , drome-CG32333 , drome-CG32483 , drome-CG33174 , drome-dnlg1 , drome-este4 , drome-este6 , drome-GH02384 , drome-GH02439 , drome-glita , drome-KRAKEN , drome-lip1 , drome-LIP2 , drome-lip3 , drome-MESK2 , drome-nrtac , drome-OME , drome-q7k274 , drome-Q9VJN0 , drome-Q8IP31 , drome-q9vux3

Title : Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete - Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
Author(s) : Fraser CM , Norris SJ , Weinstock GM , White O , Sutton GG , Dodson R , Gwinn M , Hickey EK , Clayton R , Ketchum KA , Sodergren E , Hardham JM , McLeod MP , Salzberg S , Peterson J , Khalak H , Richardson D , Howell JK , Chidambaram M , Utterback T , McDonald L , Artiach P , Bowman C , Cotton MD , Fujii C , Garland S , Hatch B , Horst K , Roberts K , Sandusky M , Weidman J , Smith HO , Venter JC
Ref : Science , 281 :375 , 1998
Abstract : The complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum was determined and shown to be 1,138,006 base pairs containing 1041 predicted coding sequences (open reading frames). Systems for DNA replication, transcription, translation, and repair are intact, but catabolic and biosynthetic activities are minimized. The number of identifiable transporters is small, and no phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase carbohydrate transporters were found. Potential virulence factors include a family of 12 potential membrane proteins and several putative hemolysins. Comparison of the T. pallidum genome sequence with that of another pathogenic spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, identified unique and common genes and substantiates the considerable diversity observed among pathogenic spirochetes.
ESTHER : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedSearch : Fraser_1998_Science_281_375
PubMedID: 9665876
Gene_locus related to this paper: trepa-naptd , trepa-TP0902 , trepa-TP0952