Gill R

References (9)

Title : Sourcing thermotolerant poly(ethylene terephthalate) hydrolase scaffolds from natural diversity - Erickson_2022_Nat.Commun_13_7850
Author(s) : Erickson E , Gado JE , Avilan L , Bratti F , Brizendine RK , Cox PA , Gill R , Graham R , Kim DJ , Konig G , Michener WE , Poudel S , Ramirez KJ , Shakespeare TJ , Zahn M , Boyd ES , Payne CM , Dubois JL , Pickford AR , Beckham GT , McGeehan JE
Ref : Nat Commun , 13 :7850 , 2022
Abstract : Enzymatic deconstruction of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is under intense investigation, given the ability of hydrolase enzymes to depolymerize PET to its constituent monomers near the polymer glass transition temperature. To date, reported PET hydrolases have been sourced from a relatively narrow sequence space. Here, we identify additional PET-active biocatalysts from natural diversity by using bioinformatics and machine learning to mine 74 putative thermotolerant PET hydrolases. We successfully express, purify, and assay 51 enzymes from seven distinct phylogenetic groups; observing PET hydrolysis activity on amorphous PET film from 37 enzymes in reactions spanning pH from 4.5-9.0 and temperatures from 30-70 degreesC. We conduct PET hydrolysis time-course reactions with the best-performing enzymes, where we observe differences in substrate selectivity as function of PET morphology. We employed X-ray crystallography and AlphaFold to examine the enzyme architectures of all 74 candidates, revealing protein folds and accessory domains not previously associated with PET deconstruction. Overall, this study expands the number and diversity of thermotolerant scaffolds for enzymatic PET deconstruction.
ESTHER : Erickson_2022_Nat.Commun_13_7850
PubMedSearch : Erickson_2022_Nat.Commun_13_7850
PubMedID: 36543766
Gene_locus related to this paper: 9arch-PETcan211 , 9cren-PETcan204 , 9cyan-305pEE028 , 9bact-102Pee006 , 9chlr-7QJM202 , 9bact-a0a656d8b6 , 9actn-a0a1t4kk94 , 9burk-PET11 , 9bact-c3ryl0 , thecs-711Erick , 9actn-RII04304 , 9actn-h6wx58 , thecd-d1a9g5 , thecd-d1a2h1 , 9acto-d4q9n1 , 9acto-f7ix06 , 9gamm-a0a3l8bw54 , 9actn-a0a0n0my27 , 9burk-a0a1e4lw26 , 9actn-Alr407 , 9gamm-a0a3l8bdt3 , 9gamm-a0a2k9lit3 , 9bact-g9by57 , bacsu-pnbae , thefu-q6a0i4 , 9actn-a0a0n0ney5 , 9pseu-a0a1i6nu60 , thefu-q6a0i3 , 9actn-a0a147kjy8 , 9actn-e9upm2

Title : Optical detection of glucose and acetylcholine esterase inhibitors by H2O2-sensitive CdSe\/ZnS quantum dots -
Author(s) : Gill R , Bahshi L , Freeman R , Willner I
Ref : Angew Chem Int Ed Engl , 47 :1676 , 2008
PubMedID: 18205163

Title : The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3 - Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
Author(s) : Muzny DM , Scherer SE , Kaul R , Wang J , Yu J , Sudbrak R , Buhay CJ , Chen R , Cree A , Ding Y , Dugan-Rocha S , Gill R , Gunaratne P , Harris RA , Hawes AC , Hernandez J , Hodgson AV , Hume J , Jackson A , Khan ZM , Kovar-Smith C , Lewis LR , Lozado RJ , Metzker ML , Milosavljevic A , Miner GR , Morgan MB , Nazareth LV , Scott G , Sodergren E , Song XZ , Steffen D , Wei S , Wheeler DA , Wright MW , Worley KC , Yuan Y , Zhang Z , Adams CQ , Ansari-Lari MA , Ayele M , Brown MJ , Chen G , Chen Z , Clendenning J , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Davis C , Delgado O , Dinh HH , Dong W , Draper H , Ernst S , Fu G , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Garcia DK , Gillett W , Gu J , Hao B , Haugen E , Havlak P , He X , Hennig S , Hu S , Huang W , Jackson LR , Jacob LS , Kelly SH , Kube M , Levy R , Li Z , Liu B , Liu J , Liu W , Lu J , Maheshwari M , Nguyen BV , Okwuonu GO , Palmeiri A , Pasternak S , Perez LM , Phelps KA , Plopper FJ , Qiang B , Raymond C , Rodriguez R , Saenphimmachak C , Santibanez J , Shen H , Shen Y , Subramanian S , Tabor PE , Verduzco D , Waldron L , Wang Q , Williams GA , Wong GK , Yao Z , Zhang J , Zhang X , Zhao G , Zhou J , Zhou Y , Nelson D , Lehrach H , Reinhardt R , Naylor SL , Yang H , Olson M , Weinstock G , Gibbs RA
Ref : Nature , 440 :1194 , 2006
Abstract : After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chromosomes. Chromosome 3 comprises just four contigs, one of which currently represents the longest unbroken stretch of finished DNA sequence known so far. The chromosome is remarkable in having the lowest rate of segmental duplication in the genome. It also includes a chemokine receptor gene cluster as well as numerous loci involved in multiple human cancers such as the gene encoding FHIT, which contains the most common constitutive fragile site in the genome, FRA3B. Using genomic sequence from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque, we were able to characterize the breakpoints defining a large pericentric inversion that occurred some time after the split of Homininae from Ponginae, and propose an evolutionary history of the inversion.
ESTHER : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedSearch : Muzny_2006_Nature_440_1194
PubMedID: 16641997
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-AADAC , human-AADACL2 , human-ABHD5 , human-ABHD6 , human-ABHD10 , human-ABHD14A , human-APEH , human-BCHE , human-CIB , human-LIPH , human-MGLL , human-NLGN1 , human-PLA1A

Title : The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome - Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
Author(s) : Ross MT , Grafham DV , Coffey AJ , Scherer S , McLay K , Muzny D , Platzer M , Howell GR , Burrows C , Bird CP , Frankish A , Lovell FL , Howe KL , Ashurst JL , Fulton RS , Sudbrak R , Wen G , Jones MC , Hurles ME , Andrews TD , Scott CE , Searle S , Ramser J , Whittaker A , Deadman R , Carter NP , Hunt SE , Chen R , Cree A , Gunaratne P , Havlak P , Hodgson A , Metzker ML , Richards S , Scott G , Steffen D , Sodergren E , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Ainscough R , Ambrose KD , Ansari-Lari MA , Aradhya S , Ashwell RI , Babbage AK , Bagguley CL , Ballabio A , Banerjee R , Barker GE , Barlow KF , Barrett IP , Bates KN , Beare DM , Beasley H , Beasley O , Beck A , Bethel G , Blechschmidt K , Brady N , Bray-Allen S , Bridgeman AM , Brown AJ , Brown MJ , Bonnin D , Bruford EA , Buhay C , Burch P , Burford D , Burgess J , Burrill W , Burton J , Bye JM , Carder C , Carrel L , Chako J , Chapman JC , Chavez D , Chen E , Chen G , Chen Y , Chen Z , Chinault C , Ciccodicola A , Clark SY , Clarke G , Clee CM , Clegg S , Clerc-Blankenburg K , Clifford K , Cobley V , Cole CG , Conquer JS , Corby N , Connor RE , David R , Davies J , Davis C , Davis J , Delgado O , Deshazo D , Dhami P , Ding Y , Dinh H , Dodsworth S , Draper H , Dugan-Rocha S , Dunham A , Dunn M , Durbin KJ , Dutta I , Eades T , Ellwood M , Emery-Cohen A , Errington H , Evans KL , Faulkner L , Francis F , Frankland J , Fraser AE , Galgoczy P , Gilbert J , Gill R , Glockner G , Gregory SG , Gribble S , Griffiths C , Grocock R , Gu Y , Gwilliam R , Hamilton C , Hart EA , Hawes A , Heath PD , Heitmann K , Hennig S , Hernandez J , Hinzmann B , Ho S , Hoffs M , Howden PJ , Huckle EJ , Hume J , Hunt PJ , Hunt AR , Isherwood J , Jacob L , Johnson D , Jones S , de Jong PJ , Joseph SS , Keenan S , Kelly S , Kershaw JK , Khan Z , Kioschis P , Klages S , Knights AJ , Kosiura A , Kovar-Smith C , Laird GK , Langford C , Lawlor S , Leversha M , Lewis L , Liu W , Lloyd C , Lloyd DM , Loulseged H , Loveland JE , Lovell JD , Lozado R , Lu J , Lyne R , Ma J , Maheshwari M , Matthews LH , McDowall J , Mclaren S , McMurray A , Meidl P , Meitinger T , Milne S , Miner G , Mistry SL , Morgan M , Morris S , Muller I , Mullikin JC , Nguyen N , Nordsiek G , Nyakatura G , O'Dell CN , Okwuonu G , Palmer S , Pandian R , Parker D , Parrish J , Pasternak S , Patel D , Pearce AV , Pearson DM , Pelan SE , Perez L , Porter KM , Ramsey Y , Reichwald K , Rhodes S , Ridler KA , Schlessinger D , Schueler MG , Sehra HK , Shaw-Smith C , Shen H , Sheridan EM , Shownkeen R , Skuce CD , Smith ML , Sotheran EC , Steingruber HE , Steward CA , Storey R , Swann RM , Swarbreck D , Tabor PE , Taudien S , Taylor T , Teague B , Thomas K , Thorpe A , Timms K , Tracey A , Trevanion S , Tromans AC , d'Urso M , Verduzco D , Villasana D , Waldron L , Wall M , Wang Q , Warren J , Warry GL , Wei X , West A , Whitehead SL , Whiteley MN , Wilkinson JE , Willey DL , Williams G , Williams L , Williamson A , Williamson H , Wilming L , Woodmansey RL , Wray PW , Yen J , Zhang J , Zhou J , Zoghbi H , Zorilla S , Buck D , Reinhardt R , Poustka A , Rosenthal A , Lehrach H , Meindl A , Minx PJ , Hillier LW , Willard HF , Wilson RK , Waterston RH , Rice CM , Vaudin M , Coulson A , Nelson DL , Weinstock G , Sulston JE , Durbin R , Hubbard T , Gibbs RA , Beck S , Rogers J , Bentley DR
Ref : Nature , 434 :325 , 2005
Abstract : The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.
ESTHER : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedSearch : Ross_2005_Nature_434_325
PubMedID: 15772651
Gene_locus related to this paper: human-NLGN3 , human-NLGN4X

Title : Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution - Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
Author(s) : Richards S , Liu Y , Bettencourt BR , Hradecky P , Letovsky S , Nielsen R , Thornton K , Hubisz MJ , Chen R , Meisel RP , Couronne O , Hua S , Smith MA , Zhang P , Liu J , Bussemaker HJ , van Batenburg MF , Howells SL , Scherer SE , Sodergren E , Matthews BB , Crosby MA , Schroeder AJ , Ortiz-Barrientos D , Rives CM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Scott G , Steffen D , Wheeler DA , Worley KC , Havlak P , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan MB , Miner G , Hamilton C , Huang Y , Waldron L , Verduzco D , Clerc-Blankenburg KP , Dubchak I , Noor MA , Anderson W , White KP , Clark AG , Schaeffer SW , Gelbart W , Weinstock GM , Gibbs RA
Ref : Genome Res , 15 :1 , 2005
Abstract : We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled, leading to a minimum of 921 syntenic blocks shared between the species. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 25-55 million years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences between the species--but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.
ESTHER : Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
PubMedSearch : Richards_2005_Genome.Res_15_1
PubMedID: 15632085
Gene_locus related to this paper: drome-BEM46 , drome-GH02439 , drops-ACHE , drops-b5dhd2 , drops-b5di70 , drops-b5djn7 , drops-b5dk96 , drops-b5dm12 , drops-b5dpe3 , drops-b5drp9 , drops-b5du62 , drops-b5dud8 , drops-b5dwa7 , drops-b5dwa8 , drops-b5dy09 , drops-b5dz85 , drops-b5dz86 , drops-b5e1k7 , drops-CG4390 , drops-est5a , drops-est5b , drops-est5c , drops-nrtac , drops-q2lyp3 , drops-q2lyp4 , drops-q2lyu3 , drops-q2lz68 , drops-q2m0u9 , drops-q2m169 , drops-q28wj5 , drops-q28wt2 , drops-q28wt8 , drops-q28zi3 , drops-q28zz1 , drops-q29a22 , drops-q29ad8 , drops-q29ad9 , drops-q29ae0 , drops-q29ae1 , drops-q29ay7 , drops-q29ay8 , drops-q29ay9 , drops-q29bq2 , drops-q29br3 , drops-q29d59 , drops-q29dc9 , drops-q29dd7 , drops-q29dp4 , drops-q29dw3 , drops-q29dw4 , drops-q29e16 , drops-q29ew0 , drops-q29f35 , drops-q29f66 , drops-q29fi0 , drops-q29fw0 , drops-q29fw9 , drops-q29g93 , drops-q29gb0 , drops-q29gs6 , drops-q29h54 , drops-b5dmp7 , drops-q29hd2 , drops-q29hu2 , drops-q29hu3 , drops-q29hv0 , drops-q29i09 , drops-q29js9 , drops-q29jt5 , drops-q29jt6 , drops-q29jy5 , drops-q29k25 , drops-q29kd5 , drops-q29kd6 , drops-q29ke5 , drops-q29kq9 , drops-q29kr1 , drops-q29kr3 , drops-q29kr5 , drops-q29kr8 , drops-q29kr9 , drops-q29ks6 , drops-q29kz0 , drops-q29kz1 , drops-q29l31 , drops-q29lf8 , drops-q29lv0 , drops-q29m07 , drops-q29m08 , drops-q29m27 , drops-q29m66 , drops-q29m81 , drops-q29mj7 , drops-q29mv2 , drops-q29mx0 , drops-q29n87 , drops-q29na5 , drops-q29na6 , drops-q29pe4 , drops-q29pk4 , drops-q290i1 , drops-q290k3 , drops-q290v8 , drops-q290v9 , drops-q290w0 , drops-q290z8 , drops-q291d5 , drops-q291e8 , drops-q291y3 , drops-q292f5 , drops-q292g6 , drops-q293n1 , drops-q293n4 , drops-q293n5 , drops-q293n6 , drops-q293y7 , drops-q294n3 , drops-q294n6 , drops-q294n7 , drops-q294n9 , drops-q294p0 , drops-q294p1 , drops-q294p3 , drops-q294p4 , drops-q294u9 , drops-q295h3 , drops-q296h2 , drops-q296x1 , drops-q296x2 , drops-q297h5 , drops-q298u8 , drope-b4gkk1

Title : Complete genome sequence of Rickettsia typhi and comparison with sequences of other rickettsiae - McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
Author(s) : McLeod MP , Qin X , Karpathy SE , Gioia J , Highlander SK , Fox GE , McNeill TZ , Jiang H , Muzny D , Jacob LS , Hawes AC , Sodergren E , Gill R , Hume J , Morgan M , Fan G , Amin AG , Gibbs RA , Hong C , Yu XJ , Walker DH , Weinstock GM
Ref : Journal of Bacteriology , 186 :5842 , 2004
Abstract : Rickettsia typhi, the causative agent of murine typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium with a life cycle involving both vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Here we present the complete genome sequence of R. typhi (1,111,496 bp) and compare it to the two published rickettsial genome sequences: R. prowazekii and R. conorii. We identified 877 genes in R. typhi encoding 3 rRNAs, 33 tRNAs, 3 noncoding RNAs, and 838 proteins, 3 of which are frameshifts. In addition, we discovered more than 40 pseudogenes, including the entire cytochrome c oxidase system. The three rickettsial genomes share 775 genes: 23 are found only in R. prowazekii and R. typhi, 15 are found only in R. conorii and R. typhi, and 24 are unique to R. typhi. Although most of the genes are colinear, there is a 35-kb inversion in gene order, which is close to the replication terminus, in R. typhi, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. In addition, we found a 124-kb R. typhi-specific inversion, starting 19 kb from the origin of replication, compared to R. prowazekii and R. conorii. Inversions in this region are also seen in the unpublished genome sequences of R. sibirica and R. rickettsii, indicating that this region is a hot spot for rearrangements. Genome comparisons also revealed a 12-kb insertion in the R. prowazekii genome, relative to R. typhi and R. conorii, which appears to have occurred after the typhus (R. prowazekii and R. typhi) and spotted fever (R. conorii) groups diverged. The three-way comparison allowed further in silico analysis of the SpoT split genes, leading us to propose that the stringent response system is still functional in these rickettsiae.
ESTHER : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedSearch : McLeod_2004_J.Bacteriol_186_5842
PubMedID: 15317790
Gene_locus related to this paper: ricco-PTRB , ricty-q68vs9 , ricty-q68w06 , ricty-q68w12 , ricty-q68w56 , ricty-q68wq9 , ricty-q68wt4 , ricty-q68x29 , ricty-q68xj3

Title : Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution - Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
Author(s) : Gibbs RA , Weinstock GM , Metzker ML , Muzny DM , Sodergren EJ , Scherer S , Scott G , Steffen D , Worley KC , Burch PE , Okwuonu G , Hines S , Lewis L , DeRamo C , Delgado O , Dugan-Rocha S , Miner G , Morgan M , Hawes A , Gill R , Celera , Holt RA , Adams MD , Amanatides PG , Baden-Tillson H , Barnstead M , Chin S , Evans CA , Ferriera S , Fosler C , Glodek A , Gu Z , Jennings D , Kraft CL , Nguyen T , Pfannkoch CM , Sitter C , Sutton GG , Venter JC , Woodage T , Smith D , Lee HM , Gustafson E , Cahill P , Kana A , Doucette-Stamm L , Weinstock K , Fechtel K , Weiss RB , Dunn DM , Green ED , Blakesley RW , Bouffard GG , de Jong PJ , Osoegawa K , Zhu B , Marra M , Schein J , Bosdet I , Fjell C , Jones S , Krzywinski M , Mathewson C , Siddiqui A , Wye N , McPherson J , Zhao S , Fraser CM , Shetty J , Shatsman S , Geer K , Chen Y , Abramzon S , Nierman WC , Havlak PH , Chen R , Durbin KJ , Egan A , Ren Y , Song XZ , Li B , Liu Y , Qin X , Cawley S , Cooney AJ , D'Souza LM , Martin K , Wu JQ , Gonzalez-Garay ML , Jackson AR , Kalafus KJ , McLeod MP , Milosavljevic A , Virk D , Volkov A , Wheeler DA , Zhang Z , Bailey JA , Eichler EE , Tuzun E , Birney E , Mongin E , Ureta-Vidal A , Woodwark C , Zdobnov E , Bork P , Suyama M , Torrents D , Alexandersson M , Trask BJ , Young JM , Huang H , Wang H , Xing H , Daniels S , Gietzen D , Schmidt J , Stevens K , Vitt U , Wingrove J , Camara F , Mar Alba M , Abril JF , Guigo R , Smit A , Dubchak I , Rubin EM , Couronne O , Poliakov A , Hubner N , Ganten D , Goesele C , Hummel O , Kreitler T , Lee YA , Monti J , Schulz H , Zimdahl H , Himmelbauer H , Lehrach H , Jacob HJ , Bromberg S , Gullings-Handley J , Jensen-Seaman MI , Kwitek AE , Lazar J , Pasko D , Tonellato PJ , Twigger S , Ponting CP , Duarte JM , Rice S , Goodstadt L , Beatson SA , Emes RD , Winter EE , Webber C , Brandt P , Nyakatura G , Adetobi M , Chiaromonte F , Elnitski L , Eswara P , Hardison RC , Hou M , Kolbe D , Makova K , Miller W , Nekrutenko A , Riemer C , Schwartz S , Taylor J , Yang S , Zhang Y , Lindpaintner K , Andrews TD , Caccamo M , Clamp M , Clarke L , Curwen V , Durbin R , Eyras E , Searle SM , Cooper GM , Batzoglou S , Brudno M , Sidow A , Stone EA , Payseur BA , Bourque G , Lopez-Otin C , Puente XS , Chakrabarti K , Chatterji S , Dewey C , Pachter L , Bray N , Yap VB , Caspi A , Tesler G , Pevzner PA , Haussler D , Roskin KM , Baertsch R , Clawson H , Furey TS , Hinrichs AS , Karolchik D , Kent WJ , Rosenbloom KR , Trumbower H , Weirauch M , Cooper DN , Stenson PD , Ma B , Brent M , Arumugam M , Shteynberg D , Copley RR , Taylor MS , Riethman H , Mudunuri U , Peterson J , Guyer M , Felsenfeld A , Old S , Mockrin S , Collins F
Ref : Nature , 428 :493 , 2004
Abstract : The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
ESTHER : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedSearch : Gibbs_2004_Nature_428_493
PubMedID: 15057822
Gene_locus related to this paper: rat-abhea , rat-abheb , rat-cd029 , rat-d3zaw4 , rat-dpp9 , rat-d3zhq1 , rat-d3zkp8 , rat-d3zuq1 , rat-d3zxw8 , rat-d4a4w4 , rat-d4a7w1 , rat-d4a9l7 , rat-d4a071 , rat-d4aa31 , rat-d4aa33 , rat-d4aa61 , rat-dglb , rat-f1lz91 , rat-Kansl3 , rat-nceh1 , rat-Tex30 , ratno-1hlip , ratno-1neur , ratno-1plip , ratno-2neur , ratno-3neur , ratno-3plip , ratno-ABH15 , ratno-ACHE , ratno-balip , ratno-BCHE , ratno-cauxin , ratno-Ces1d , ratno-Ces1e , ratno-Ces2f , ratno-d3ze31 , ratno-d3zp14 , ratno-d3zxi3 , ratno-d3zxq0 , ratno-d3zxq1 , ratno-d4a3d4 , ratno-d4aa05 , ratno-dpp4 , ratno-dpp6 , ratno-est8 , ratno-FAP , ratno-hyep , ratno-hyes , ratno-kmcxe , ratno-lmcxe , ratno-LOC246252 , ratno-MGLL , ratno-pbcxe , ratno-phebest , ratno-Ppgb , ratno-q4qr68 , ratno-q6ayr2 , ratno-q6q629 , ratno-SPG21 , ratno-thyro , rat-m0rc77 , rat-a0a0g2k9y7 , rat-a0a0g2kb83 , rat-d3zba8 , rat-d3zbj1 , rat-d3zcr8 , rat-d3zxw5 , rat-d4a340 , rat-f1lvg7 , rat-m0r509 , rat-m0r5d4 , rat-b5den3 , rat-d3zxk4 , rat-d4a1b6 , rat-d3zmg4 , rat-ab17c

Title : Donepezil reverses a mnemonic deficit produced by scopolamine but not by perforant path lesion or transient cerebral ischaemia - Higgins_2002_Eur.J.Neurosci_15_1827
Author(s) : Higgins GA , Enderlin M , Fimbel R , Haman M , Grottick AJ , Soriano M , Richards JG , Kemp JA , Gill R
Ref : European Journal of Neuroscience , 15 :1827 , 2002
Abstract : The purpose of these studies were threefold. Firstly, to further characterize the effect of perforant path transection on a test of short-term memory: delayed matching (or nonmatching)-to-position [D(N)MTP]. Secondly, to evaluate the effect of a transient cerebral ischaemia in the same task. Both surgical procedures were chosen as they produce a CNS lesion similar to that described in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Thirdly, the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept(R), E2020), on the resulting cognitive impairment was studied. Perforant path transection produced a robust, delay-dependent impairment of choice accuracy in rats performing either a delayed matching- or nonmatching-to-position task. Sample latency was also reduced following lesion, yet the lesion-induced impairment was not affected by increasing the response requirement at the sample stage. An 11-min period of transient ischaemia (two-vessel occlusion model) resulted in almost complete loss of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and a delay-dependent impairment in DMTP performance. However, unlike perforant path lesions, this deficit was unstable and declined in magnitude over the experimental period. Increasing the delay interval restored this deficit. Donepezil, at doses that robustly attenuated a scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg s.c.)-induced DMTP accuracy impairment in naive, unoperated rats, had no effect against either lesion-induced impairment. The results are considered in terms of the effectiveness of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in noncholinergic-based preclinical cognitive models.
ESTHER : Higgins_2002_Eur.J.Neurosci_15_1827
PubMedSearch : Higgins_2002_Eur.J.Neurosci_15_1827
PubMedID: 12081663

Title : Striatal A2 receptor regulates apomorphine-induced turning in rats with unilateral dopamine denervation - Brown_1991_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_103_78
Author(s) : Brown SJ , Gill R , Evenden JL , Iversen SD , Richardson PJ
Ref : Psychopharmacology (Berl) , 103 :78 , 1991
Abstract : The effect of the purine agonist N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine (NECA) on apomorphine-induced rotation was investigated in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway. Intrastriatal administration of NECA on the denervated side caused a dose-dependent inhibition of contralateral rotation. This inhibition was prevented by prior intrastriatal injection of theophylline. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyltheophylline was ineffective at concentrations which block this receptor, but effective in preventing the action of NECA at concentrations which block the adenosine A2 receptor. In the absence of apomorphine, NECA had no effect on behaviour. It is concluded that A2 receptor activation counteracts apomorphine effects in the striatum. Since the A2 receptor may be localized to striatal cholinergic neurones, the possible role of these neurones in purine-induced behaviours is discussed.
ESTHER : Brown_1991_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_103_78
PubMedSearch : Brown_1991_Psychopharmacology.(Berl)_103_78
PubMedID: 1900945